Bianchi rear brake setup difficult?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Bianchi rear brake setup difficult?

    I'm interested in a Bianchi SASS or SISS. How much difficulty is there setting up disk brakes with track dropouts? Thanks,

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by weskimad
    I'm interested in a Bianchi SASS or SISS. How much difficulty is there setting up disk brakes with track dropouts? Thanks,

    Setting them up is no problem. But you have to adjust the disc calipers any time you change the position of the wheel in the dropout, like if you change the chain length or the cog size or the chainring size. A flip-flop hub with two sizes of freewheels would require an adjustment everytime you flip your wheel. I'm not sure about Bianchis, but on many horizontal dropouts, you have to loosen/remove the calipers whenever you remove the wheel, in which case you're making the adjustment any time you get a flat. To me, that's unacceptable and would warrant V brakes, which is why I think many people go with a V on the rear and a disc on the front. Alternately, you could opt for the Kona/On-One solution of the sliding dropout/caliper mount, or, of course, any number of EBB's.

    Here's Sheldon Brown on the topic:

    "Disc brakes are increasingly popular for off-road use, and a number of high-end ready-made singlespeed bikes are supplied with front and rear disc brakes. In my opinion, this is not a good thing.

    Personally I consider rear disc brakes a very poor choice for a singlespeed. It would preclude you from using a flip-flop hub . Also, as the chain wears and the axle is moved backward to take up the slack, the relationship of the disc to the caliper will change. That can't be good.

    Singlespeeds are generally not practical for terrain so steep as to require dual disc brakes. There's no reason to avoid front disc brakes, but I strongly advise against getting a rear disc setup for a singlespeed."
    Last edited by Fixintogo; 10-21-2005 at 06:39 PM.

  3. #3
    Hoopy Frood
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    No problems with track dropouts

    I run front and rear 6" discs on my Surly 1x1 with no problems. It's got track fork ends and works great. I don't even have to loosen the caliper to remove the wheel.

    Maybe I'm just lucky but I think it's probably easier than using rim brakes. When I adjust chain tension or change cogs, I don't need to adjust the brakes at all (unless it's a huge change in cog size).

    - khill
    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. - Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
    No Justice = No Peace
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    S I S S

    No problem on my girls' bike. You do have to loosen it, but it's no big deal at all, just put it back where you want it and tighten the bolts. The bigger pain in the ass is the tug nuts, which require you to nearly remove the axle bolts in order to slip the wheel out.


    My own SS has an ENO hub and V-Brakes, which is slick as snot, and my new 29er will have disc and an EBB.
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by khill
    I run front and rear 6" discs on my Surly 1x1 with no problems. It's got track fork ends and works great. I don't even have to loosen the caliper to remove the wheel.

    Maybe I'm just lucky but I think it's probably easier than using rim brakes. When I adjust chain tension or change cogs, I don't need to adjust the brakes at all (unless it's a huge change in cog size).

    - khill
    i agree...i'm running a plowboy with track droputs and juicy 7's, with no problems. i'm running the polygon rotors so whenever i want to take the rear wheel out, i just turn it so the 'valley' in the rotor passes through the caliper....don't have to loosen a thing. reverse the process during reassembly, make sure the wheel is centered, and i'm good to go
    "lift your skinny fists like antennas to heaven"

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