Best SS Racing Bike?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Best SS Racing Bike?

    I'm having trouble with the search function so I apologize if this has been asked before. . .

    I know this is pretty subjective but, assuming no limit on budget, what would be your ideal SS set-up for racing?

    I'm considering building up a Karate Monkey or old Monocog. What are your thoughts on front suspension for a race bike?

  2. #2
    Monkey Junkie
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    I'd want light weight stuff. I'd definitely want a suspension fork, assuming most other racers have them.

  3. #3
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    Assuming an unlimited budget, I'm definitely not buying a Surly or a Redline as a race bike. I'd take a hard look at an Air9 Carbon with the niner carbon fork to match and I'd pick up a F29 for the rougher courses. Aside from the Niner, I'd look to custom builders.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BShow
    Assuming an unlimited budget, I'm definitely not buying a Surly or a Redline as a race bike. I'd take a hard look at an Air9 Carbon with the niner carbon fork to match and I'd pick up a F29 for the rougher courses. Aside from the Niner, I'd look to custom builders.
    same where A9C with carbon fork.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BShow
    Assuming an unlimited budget, I'm definitely not buying a Surly or a Redline as a race bike. I'd take a hard look at an Air9 Carbon with the niner carbon fork to match and I'd pick up a F29 for the rougher courses. Aside from the Niner, I'd look to custom builders.
    Is that to say the Surly and Redline bikes are not good for racing? I'm going to be doing Category 3 type stuff for now so I don't know that the Air9 is worth the money at this stage of the game. Budget really isn't an issue but I don't know if spending that kind of money is going to make a difference at this point.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericlikestobuild
    Is that to say the Surly and Redline bikes are not good for racing? I'm going to be doing Category 3 type stuff for now so I don't know that the Air9 is worth the money at this stage of the game. Budget really isn't an issue but I don't know if spending that kind of money is going to make a difference at this point.
    Not that you cant race the surly or monocog....its just that for a race bike I would think there are better suited frames. For me I want a lightweight and stiff frame...Hence the reason I built a Niner One9 this year. Bike is right at 19 lbs without really trying to cut weight.

    If I had another 1000 in my budget I would have built the A9C and went with some lighter bits. But on the flip side I dont just race my bike. I ride it...alot and I didnt want to be replacing parts and retruing wheelset all the time. Its a balance and trade off. I race Cat 2/Sport class.

    What is your budget?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by canonshooter

    What is your budget?
    I'd like to keep everything under $1,500. I'm not really sure what that's going to get me though.

    I think the Surly is running around $1,000 out of the box and and Redline is around $550.

  8. #8
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    do you have components you can part over to the new build? One9 frames can be had for around $800.

    Also the Ventana El Commandante frames (Old Style) were going for $700 through Ventana direct. They may still have some in stock.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericlikestobuild
    Is that to say the Surly and Redline bikes are not good for racing? I'm going to be doing Category 3 type stuff for now so I don't know that the Air9 is worth the money at this stage of the game. Budget really isn't an issue but I don't know if spending that kind of money is going to make a difference at this point.
    Its not that Surly and Redline are not good for racing, its that you said if you had an unlimited budget what would you get.

    Its like asking if you had an unlimited budget for a sports car what would you get. Everyone is going to list a $150,000+ super car, no one is going to say a mustang or base corvette. Not that they aren't good or fast cars but with an unlimited budget you can get nicer and better.

    Quote Originally Posted by canonshooter
    Not that you cant race the surly or monocog....its just that for a race bike I would think there are better suited frames. For me I want a lightweight and stiff frame...Hence the reason I built a Niner One9 this year. Bike is right at 19 lbs without really trying to cut weight.

    If I had another 1000 in my budget I would have built the A9C and went with some lighter bits. But on the flip side I dont just race my bike. I ride it...alot and I didnt want to be replacing parts and retruing wheelset all the time. Its a balance and trade off. I race Cat 2/Sport class.

    What is your budget?
    Same here, I am just finishing building a one9 also. If I had unlimited budget it would be a carbon Air 9 instead. But I am happy with my one9, but mine is 24 pounds But it was not built as a racing bike.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by canonshooter
    do you have components you can part over to the new build? One9 frames can be had for around $800.

    Also the Ventana El Commandante frames (Old Style) were going for $700 through Ventana direct. They may still have some in stock.

    I've got a nice parts collection I'll be able to choose from. I also have a Specialized Rockhopper I'm thinking about turning into a SS.

  11. #11
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    What size wheels are you wanting to run? If your just looking for a frame, Lynskey has a L and XL Ridgeline SS 26er on their Loft section for $895. Not a bad deal for ti. If it was a medium I'd be all over that deal for a build.

  12. #12
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    Misfitpsycles Dissent will fit the budget and get you started in a racing direction. Can be built light and really well done geo for racing. Click my signature for details...

  13. #13
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    I've raced Cat1 on a KM

    I'm racing a Singular Swift now though.

    I prefer the fork on the Swift to the KM, and I really like the EBB. I've run a suspension fork on both, but when I'm not injured I'd rather ride rigid.
    You could build either within you budget, especially if you have a parts bin to raid.

  14. #14
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    Right. Not to say that you can't race on those bikes... but there are better options out there, for sure. Niner One9 is a fantastic option as a race bike that won't break the bank. The frame is around $800, you can get a rigid fork for about $200 and then spend $500 on your wheels from Stans. Hopefully you can dig up a crankset, some brakes and the other components from your parts bin. Even if you have to build from scratch, you're looking at a killer race singlespeed for under $2000. I had my One9 built to sub 19# without going crazy with weight weenie parts.

  15. #15
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    I plan on doing a couple of races this summer. Nothing serious mind you but they will be races none the less. I pretty much amassed a bunch of parts on my old 26, then bought a cheap Moto Outcast frame for $190 converted my wheels to 29 and will be riding that. So far I have had no problems and it came in about 1.5 lbs lighter than my old 26er. Granted I have some pretty nice parts on my bike but for under $200 for my frame I really can't and won't complain if I break it. That will give me an excuse to get something ti the next go around! Bike weighs 20.5 lbs.

  16. #16
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    Get a monocog or KM and spend an extra fifteen minutes training. Are you even a competitive racer?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Get a monocog or KM and spend an extra fifteen minutes training. Are you even a competitive racer?
    I agree. Just run what you brung (brought). What are the other guys gonna do except pedal faster?

    In the end everyone's gonna be tired. Just have a good time. When it's over.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BShow
    Right. Not to say that you can't race on those bikes... but there are better options out there, for sure. Niner One9 is a fantastic option as a race bike that won't break the bank. The frame is around $800, you can get a rigid fork for about $200 and then spend $500 on your wheels from Stans. Hopefully you can dig up a crankset, some brakes and the other components from your parts bin. Even if you have to build from scratch, you're looking at a killer race singlespeed for under $2000. I had my One9 built to sub 19# without going crazy with weight weenie parts.


    Totally agree. I've been racing a rigid One9 this season and love it.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Get a monocog or KM and spend an extra fifteen minutes training. Are you even a competitive racer?
    Also excellent advice. Once you reach the KM or Monocog level of bikes (which are outstanding values), almost everything else is really the rider. A $5K A9C is not anywhere close to 5x as good as a $1K KM, and you don't even have to spend that much.

    But if you're only going to spend the extra $$$ on a big screen TV, or a Rolex, yeah, get the A9C and trick it out instead.

  20. #20
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    Yeah i'm strongly looking into a One9 as my next MTB frame

    Still got to build a city bike for riding the streets as i'm in Mississippi and it's about to be heavy duty snake time on all my local trails.

  21. #21
    The Brutally Handsome
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    This might sound like a silly question, but is there a point where a singlespeed is too light for racing? SS obviously requires more standing and mashing to get through steep sections, which can cause the rear to lose traction. It seems that an exceedingly light bike would contribute to the problem, but perhaps skill with body positioning mitigates the issue?

  22. #22
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    Just run whatever and dont spend too much! I did just as well on my garbage Dawes Deadeye in a local race as people on 4k geared bikes.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    This might sound like a silly question, but is there a point where a singlespeed is too light for racing? SS obviously requires more standing and mashing to get through steep sections, which can cause the rear to lose traction. It seems that an exceedingly light bike would contribute to the problem, but perhaps skill with body positioning mitigates the issue?
    No such thing as too light, IMO. But I wouldn't spend any amount of money or sacrifice any amount of durability just to have a lighter bike. With today's components and frames, you reach the point of diminishing return somewhere near 22/23 lbs, IMHO. I ride an 18lb rigid, FWIW. Body position, technique, and tires/pressure make all the difference in climbing. I'd be riding a 1lb bike it there was one made that was as durable and about the same cost as a 18lb'er.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    This might sound like a silly question, but is there a point where a singlespeed is too light for racing? SS obviously requires more standing and mashing to get through steep sections, which can cause the rear to lose traction. It seems that an exceedingly light bike would contribute to the problem, but perhaps skill with body positioning mitigates the issue?
    The weight really makes a noticable difference on climbs. I went from Steel to Carbon and the climbing is definitely easier for me. I still prefer Steel to Carbon. Now I just gotta try the Ti.
    anything Steel

  25. #25
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    I have 2005 cannondale 1FG and although i use it as city bike. its an ideal race bike. very light, stiff and responsive frame, plus 1.3kg/80mm fatty ultra fork with lockout.
    Dont know what is current cannondale line, but you can get bit older 1fg or bad boy on ebay quite often.

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