The best rigid riding advice I can give.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 68 of 68
  1. #1
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    I'm prepared to take some flack for this, but I've seen the questions asked time and time again as to how to make rigid riding hurt less. I took the time to put everything I've learned into one post.

    In a nutshell...

    Bad Idea Racing: Share the Wisdom Wednesdays ((on Thursdays) but on Tuesday this time): Part Eight


    The best rigid riding advice I can give.-pc210787.jpg
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SlowPokePete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,586
    I don't see how riding in flip-flops is going to make it easier, but I'm willing to give it a try...

    SPP
    Rigid.

  3. #3
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowPokePete View Post
    I don't see how riding in flip-flops is going to make it easier, but I'm willing to give it a try...

    SPP
    I'd only recommend it if you have a pump track in your den/bike room.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    710

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    Thanks for posting, fun read.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    448
    my wife won't let me get a "drooper"

  6. #6
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Tell her it will make you a better husband.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    11,418
    Good stuff. I've been a draper (and a shaker) forever, eventually I'll probably cave and try a drooper.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,666
    My wife would be disappointed if I only had a drooper.

  9. #9
    San Miguel Beer Drinker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    321

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    Maybe I'll try the drooper on my ss rigid too.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    I like turtles
    Reputation: TiGeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    6,325
    Spot-on.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2018 Niner RKT 9 RDO - enduro AF

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: robertdavid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    702
    Just wondering how wide, in inches, your handlebars are? Thanks

  12. #12
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by robertdavid View Post
    Just wondering how wide, in inches, your handlebars are? Thanks

    700mm or 27.56".

    For reference, I'm only 5' 6.5" tall.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    718
    >700mm is "wide" in my book. <640mm is what I'd consider narrow, everything in between is "average". I personally ride a 690mm wide bar (cut down Thomson). I basically trimmed it until I stopped clipping trees and rocks with it. Another trick I use which I didn't see mentioned is to move my hands around on the bars when I can. This worked great at the H100 this year, where there were long stretches of paved or dirt road. I'd move my hands in to just outside of the stem. It shortens the reach and gets you a touch more upright, taking weight off your hands, and it's a touch more aero too!

    For your core work, try holding your legs in an 'L' shape while doing your chin ups. Nothing better than cutting your training time in half by doubling up!

  14. #14
    Jon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    345
    I always ride with a little rear bias on my rigid stuff and tend to air down the front tire some for the rough stuff. Really I prefeer a rigid bike over suspension for most trail riding as it is more effeicient. I also get fat BMX grips like ODI long necks or Yeti MTBs they help Cush the vibes. A softer tire compound helps absorb rocks and such too.

  15. #15
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by solo-x View Post

    For your core work, try holding your legs in an 'L' shape while doing your chin ups. Nothing better than cutting your training time in half by doubling up!

    I do that when I'm not feeling lazy.


    I usually feel lazy.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azjonboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,657
    I weigh 185 and run an Ardent up front at 18psi. Also have similar philosophy regarding handlebar to seat drop. Although a bit older at 55 , no hand wrist problems after 7 years of rigid riding. Using a big sweep Ti bar has helped tremendously.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  17. #17
    The White Jeff W
    Reputation: jeffw-13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,571
    One thing I've found that helps with hand pain not just on my rigid bike but on all my bikes is glove choice. I always try to find gloves that don't have a seam at the thumb joint. The seam presses into the meaty part of my thumb and starts to ache after awhile.
    No moss...

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: claystrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    264
    Hey TD wanted to get your advice on something, since you have more time riding SS.
    I typically try and spin with best cadence I can while training on my rigid SS, but sometimes when climbing, the cadence obviously gets slower and the pressure on the knees gets greater. Have you ever had knee issues while getting used to gearing? and does this eventually get better over time or is it better to be standing more often?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    861
    Quote Originally Posted by claystrick View Post
    I typically try and spin with best cadence I can while training on my rigid SS, but sometimes when climbing, the cadence obviously gets slower and the pressure...
    More standing is really good. Especially when I am rigid....

    Oh wait, were you guys talking about the fork?

  20. #20
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by claystrick View Post
    Hey TD wanted to get your advice on something, since you have more time riding SS.
    I typically try and spin with best cadence I can while training on my rigid SS, but sometimes when climbing, the cadence obviously gets slower and the pressure on the knees gets greater. Have you ever had knee issues while getting used to gearing? and does this eventually get better over time or is it better to be standing more often?
    I will sometimes sit back in the saddle and grind it out, but I do a lot of my climbing standing up. When I run a gear that might spin up easier, I have a harder time transitioning between the two.

    And I've had knee issues, but mostly from riding with my knees uncovered in cold weather.

    Bad Idea Racing: Share the Wisdom Wednesdays (on Thursdays): Part Four

    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  21. #21
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13 View Post
    One thing I've found that helps with hand pain not just on my rigid bike but on all my bikes is glove choice. I always try to find gloves that don't have a seam at the thumb joint. The seam presses into the meaty part of my thumb and starts to ache after awhile.
    I tend to look for the simplest, non-padded gloves I can find. Inserts and whatnot just create hotspots for me.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    179
    im currently riding a carver 490mm fork. not sure if you've ridden it, anyways... i noticed you have the new enve rigid fork on your (vertigo?).
    looks the business. which do you prefer and why? - your niner rdo or the enve fork. thanks home-skillet

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,736
    I've been holding the bars like that since I started riding mountain bikes. I never really even thought about it or realized it till two people here, this week, have mentioned that they also do it. Also, I grip the bars with such a loose grip that the bars are almost banging around inside my hand. I learned to do this racing motocross. You can learn how to ride by letting your body have most of the control over the bike and not controlling the bike with your arms and hands. Sometimes on steep climbs I'll lay an index finger on the bar on each side of the stem and use my hips to steer the bike.

  24. #24
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,870

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Sometimes on steep climbs I'll lay an index finger on the bar on each side of the stem and use my hips to steer the bike.
    Seated or standing?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,736
    Seated, don't think I could do that standing.

  26. #26
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,870
    Ahh, anything with steep in the title and I'm standing.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: santabooze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    243
    Subcribed

  28. #28
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by Radioinactive View Post
    im currently riding a carver 490mm fork. not sure if you've ridden it, anyways... i noticed you have the new enve rigid fork on your (vertigo?).
    looks the business. which do you prefer and why? - your niner rdo or the enve fork. thanks home-skillet

    Comfort-wise, they're apples to apples. I kind of expected that.

    I bought the ENVE so I could run the Maxxis Chronicle 3.0 when I want to. The clearance on the Niner fork was too close for comfort for me.

    Bad Idea Racing: Frokken

    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evenslower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    350
    Great advice going on here. Only thing I can add that might be of benefit is to stay off the brakes in the rough stuff (roots, rocks, smallish drops). Do your braking before rough sections when at speed or try to float over it. If you've got to brake to regain some composure use the rear. The front brake amplifies the situation and in my experience tends to make matters worse.

    How close was too close TD? Rubbing?

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: santabooze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    243
    I raced the 2014 24HOP, full rigid with the carver 490mm fork, I only started to get sore in the later parts of the event. I find it way more compliant than my Niner RDO.

    Just my 2cents

    SATORI

  31. #31
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by evenslower View Post
    Great advice going on here. Only thing I can add that might be of benefit is to stay off the brakes in the rough stuff (roots, rocks, smallish drops). Do your braking before rough sections when at speed or try to float over it. If you've got to brake to regain some composure use the rear. The front brake amplifies the situation and in my experience tends to make matters worse.

    How close was too close TD? Rubbing?
    Close enough that if I got in muddy conditions, I felt like I might be dragging mud against the fork. Since I race mostly endurance events, I don't wanna see what sanded down crabon looks like after nine hours.

    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,736
    Quote Originally Posted by NordieBoy View Post
    Ahh, anything with steep in the title and I'm standing.
    I do switch from seated to standing on long climbs. But, when it gets really steep it's hard for me to keep tracktion on the rear wheel while standing.

  33. #33
    Stateline Falls, Watauga
    Reputation: JeffL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    I do switch from seated to standing on long climbs. But, when it gets really steep it's hard for me to keep tracktion on the rear wheel while standing.
    When it gets "really steep" you're able to stay seated on a singlespeed? Just the thought of it makes my back and knees ache...
    It never gets easier, you just go faster. -Greg LeMond
    I'm not as fast as I think I am. -JeffL

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,736
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffL View Post
    When it gets "really steep" you're able to stay seated on a singlespeed? Just the thought of it makes my back and knees ache...
    Let me correct myself: When it gets really steep I'm pushing.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: robertdavid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    702
    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Let me correct myself: When it gets really steep I'm pushing.
    I agree with and approve this post.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,014
    i will add one new development that should rock the rigid world soon enough i think.

    adding a 3" front tire is amazing! especially if your a fat guy like me who can't really air down a normal 29er front tire without fear of pinchflatting. it just makes everything better except maybe climbing which i don't really like to begin with.

    once the chronicle officially comes out and dicky tells you how great he thinks it is (at least i'd guess he's gonna think it is great based on my personal testing with the innova 29+) i am betting this movement is gonna move ;-P

    if you ride rigid and haven't tired a REAL fatty up front yet, get on it!

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,218

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill View Post
    i will add one new development that should rock the rigid world soon enough i think.

    adding a 3" front tire is amazing! especially if your a fat guy like me who can't really air down a normal 29er front tire without fear of pinchflatting. it just makes everything better except maybe climbing which i don't really like to begin with.

    once the chronicle officially comes out and dicky tells you how great he thinks it is (at least i'd guess he's gonna think it is great based on my personal testing with the innova 29+) i am betting this movement is gonna move ;-P

    if you ride rigid and haven't tired a REAL fatty up front yet, get on it!
    Now wide a rim are you running that on? Did it setup tubeless?

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    718
    IMO, knee pain is a fit issue, not an SS issue. It just happens that if you're spinning at a high cadence a lot, or seated pushing a hard gear (both things more common on an SS than on a geared bike) a lot, you will expose a fit issue more easily. Most common cause IME? Setting the saddle too far back (or too high), which engages your hamstrings too much, resulting in a muscle imbalance that manifests as pain in the knees.

    Or, riding in the cold with your knees exposed. That'll do it too.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,014
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Now wide a rim are you running that on? Did it setup tubeless?
    i got mine on the new style (wider) flow. went together tubeless no problem and seems to work well (except i did get it to buzz the stantions a couple times when i got really rowdy at around 15 psi; i think that means i just need a few more psi). it is a new wheel and i must say that i do have a unfortunately have a little buyers remorse now... had i known how much i'd like this 3.0 i'd have had a chosen the new hugo rim instead since i don't see myself running anything narrower on this bike again. with the wider rim i think i could probably run it lower with less squirm BUT even if i need 20 psi to keep it from buzzing it beats the hell out of my old 2.4 that i needed to keep at a minimum of 30psi to keep from pinching.

    one thing you may want to make sure you have with a tire this size is a digital pressure gauge. when all the difference comes from 2-3 psi +/- the gauge on the floor pump becomes virtually useless. i don't have one yet so i haven't figured out how to really dial the pressure in exactly enough.

    max

  40. #40
    Jon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    345
    A good low pressure digital gauge is a little painfull at first from sticker shock but pays for itself for use with tires, air shocks and other low pressure applications. They are excellent for dialing that perfect balance for forks or F/R bias on tires. I got mine from Summit Racing years ago and use it regularly on all kinds of stuff, not just my MTB but anything that requires low precision pressure.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,218

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    Thanks max. I'm going to give one a try on a too narrow rim and perhaps pick up a Hugo after if that works ok. Anyone know which 29x3.0 is the smallest? I might be able to fit a smaller one in the back.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Acko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    256
    If you're going to start using 29+ tyres, I'd say get a proper frame or fork for it...
    All this "will it fit" business sounds like 2 years ago when everyone was trying to do dodgy 650b conversions...
    You won't see any front Tyre over 2.35" on my rigid ss for marathon, stage or 24hr racing...

  43. #43
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,870
    And some of those dodgy conversions worked really really well.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,218

    The best rigid riding advice I can give.

    Some folks like to try before they buy. I'm going for either 29+ or 650b+ at some point, but why not dabble a bit first?

  45. #45
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    5,699
    I've been using a SKS digital gauge that will do presta or schrader on my fat bike tires with great results. and it won't break the bank. i never run more than 9psi and have been as low as 4.0 in deep snow. I also use it on my recently converted half fat Kona Unit. i really want to try the 29+ setup though, instead of a 4.0 tire, with a 29+ specific fork.

    Attachment 951254

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    122
    Dicky - I noticed on your blog you switched back to the ardent (presumably a 2.4) instead of the chronicle for a recent ride and just wondered why? Purely down to the extra 200g weight in the chronicle or certain rides where you feel the ardent is a better tyre for the job?

  47. #47
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunzl View Post
    Dicky - I noticed on your blog you switched back to the ardent (presumably a 2.4) instead of the chronicle for a recent ride and just wondered why? Purely down to the extra 200g weight in the chronicle or certain rides where you feel the ardent is a better tyre for the job?
    I do like the Chronicle, and if I'm just going to be playing... fine.

    Problem being that it's still a slow handler compared to the 2.4 Ardent. Th extra weight and traction can require some man-handling. I'm having a hard time figuring out if there's anywhere that I would want to race it.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: iceboxsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    750
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    And I've had knee issues, but mostly from riding with my knees uncovered in cold weather.

    Bad Idea Racing: Share the Wisdom Wednesdays (on Thursdays): Part Four
    Quote Originally Posted by solo-x View Post
    Or, riding in the cold with your knees exposed. That'll do it too.
    So an old timer said this to me the other day, but in my typical brash mid-20s SSer New Englander fashion I replied that I respectfully disagreed. But this is really that true eh? I ride with shorts at least until its 40 or so.
    Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    I do like the Chronicle, and if I'm just going to be playing... fine.

    Problem being that it's still a slow handler compared to the 2.4 Ardent. Th extra weight and traction can require some man-handling. I'm having a hard time figuring out if there's anywhere that I would want to race it.
    Interesting, thanks.

  50. #50
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by iceboxsteve View Post
    So an old timer said this to me the other day, but in my typical brash mid-20s SSer New Englander fashion I replied that I respectfully disagreed. But this is really that true eh? I ride with shorts at least until its 40 or so.
    If you clicked that link, you read my story. I pushed my luck in my early cycling years, and now I pay the price for my youthful sense of immortality.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  51. #51
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunzl View Post
    Interesting, thanks.
    Kinda sucks, because I do love riding with it. It's fun and more comfortable, but not faster when it's time to go fast.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation: iceboxsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    750
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    If you clicked that link, you read my story. I pushed my luck in my early cycling years, and now I pay the price for my youthful sense of immortality.
    But I am immortal....

    Naw, for real, I cover lots of things for protection men of other generations didn't because I learned from their mistakes. Like helmets. thanks for helping a youngin'.
    Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    718
    Quote Originally Posted by iceboxsteve View Post
    So an old timer said this to me the other day, but in my typical brash mid-20s SSer New Englander fashion I replied that I respectfully disagreed. But this is really that true eh? I ride with shorts at least until its 40 or so.
    I'll add that everyone is different and avoiding the really stupid stuff (like riding on the road in shorts when it's 20* out…) may stave off any problems. If you think about what happens when you get cold though, it makes sense. Your body's natural defense to the cold is to reduce blood flow to your extremities. The colder the extremity, the less blood flow. An exposed knee is going to be very cold (no fat for insulation, front edge of your leg, etc.) and thus very little blood flow. Very little blood flow to nourish the cartilage and fluids that lubricate the knee joint. Do that a bunch and you basically start grinding up the meniscus, and once that is gone you're in a lot of pain and will have a lot of knee problems.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,014
    Quote Originally Posted by Acko View Post
    If you're going to start using 29+ tyres, I'd say get a proper frame or fork for it...
    All this "will it fit" business sounds like 2 years ago when everyone was trying to do dodgy 650b conversions...
    You won't see any front Tyre over 2.35" on my rigid ss for marathon, stage or 24hr racing...
    BUT the beauty of just using a 29+ tire up front is that most rigid forks will easily fit one. i don't think i'd want to spin one of those huge suckers up out back anyhow. I think the perfect 29+ bike for me is fat up front only (and my existing bike works perfect like this; only thing needed maybe is a wider front rim).

    ALSO ALSO; why are we debating faster??? i do get it to an extent; but if fast is your main concern i hear there are these two revolutionary technologies called suspension and gears... ;-P i don't know about you guys but i don't ride the rigid bike cause it is the fastest (sometimes it is, but not very often).

    ALSO ALSO finally; i am thinking the 29+ front may be of bigger benefit in everyday use for those of us with enough extra natural weight where a few hundred extra grams in tire weight won't matter much. i certainly don't notice any extra rolling resistance. if it makes climbing harder; well climbing is always hard for me anyhow....

  55. #55
    Jon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    345
    Don't forget the " chopper " effect it will inevitably give. That extra 40 mm of fork will adversely affect response and washout.

  56. #56
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill View Post
    ALSO ALSO; why are we debating faster??? i do get it to an extent; but if fast is your main concern i hear there are these two revolutionary technologies called suspension and gears... ;-P i don't know about you guys but i don't ride the rigid bike cause it is the fastest (sometimes it is, but not very often).
    I don't ride/race on a rigid bike because it's faster... ever. It's just what I like when I choose to do it.

    That said, I like going faster with less effort as opposed to going slower with more. Comfort takes a back seat in there somewhere.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,014
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    Comfort takes a back seat in there somewhere.
    makes perfect sense... as a larger gentlemen it is pretty evident comfort takes precedence more often in my decisions. Everyone has to draw there own line in the sand.

    With that 40 dollar tire on amazon it is pretty easy to just rig one up and decide for yourself (if your fork is wide enough) without wasting a ton of time or money. I couldn't be happier with mine and i don't plan to take it off. I will warn you though, it could make you want a wider front rim... I wish i could try a ride with this tire on the hugo rim to see if it really feels 2-300 dollars better on a 50mm rim than it does on the 30mm one i have now (i really don't want to build another new wheel cause the wheel i have now is pretty much brand new and awesome for normal sized tires).

  58. #58
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill View Post
    I wish i could try a ride with this tire on the hugo rim to see if it really feels 2-300 dollars better on a 50mm rim than it does on the 30mm one i have now (i really don't want to build another new wheel cause the wheel i have now is pretty much brand new and awesome for normal sized tires).
    I'm in the same boat. Want to try the Chronicle on a Hugo as well. Don't wanna chunk down the money to make it happen... only to be sads.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,666
    (I just posted this in the 29er forum as well.) Rode my Karate Monkey SS with a 29x2.4 tire up front, 29x2.25 rear, Vassago rigid fork, wide aluminum bar, dropper post, yadda yadda. I was riding with a large group and I was one of two people on a singlespeed hardtail, and the only one with a rigid fork.

    Normally I ride these trails with a rigid fork and have a grand old time, but the speed I needed to maintain to keep the last rider in front of me in view meant I got really beat up in the rocky sections. It was brutal. I keep my tire pressure as low as it is safe to do without pinching the tire and I still feel like I spent those two hours inside a cement mixer truck.

    The problem is mostly the front wheel- I just can't "pick the right line" at that speed, on the kind of terrain and the rocks kill my momentum, along with my wrists.

    I tried hating everything too. It turns out that the local rocks' capacity for hatered is stronger.

    I was thinking a 29+ tire on a wider rim would help, but that would mean building a new wheel and buying an expensive tire. I'll see if I can borrow one and maybe build that when I can justify the expense (I blew my bike parts budget out of the water recently.)

    what's your experience with 29+ front wheels on rigid? What's the limit at which it is just not practical?

    Not interested in carbon fiber anything, for a variety of reasons. If it comes down to that, I'll just put my squish fork back on for keeping speed in the rough stuff. Make bikes metal again!

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SingleSpeedSteven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    417
    I rode my Jabberwocky as 29+ for a season and loved it. I ran 45mm rims with Chupacabras at around 12psi. I basically kept dropping pressure until I heard rim on rock and then added a lb or 2 back.

    Im back on skinnies since breaking my Vassago frame and its night and day imo. Id run 29+ again in a heartbeat but I race my rigid SS so fast rolling skinnies will be on this thing for a while at least.

  61. #61
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,870
    2.35" on rigid is the biggest I've gone.
    I found 50 years old is when it becomes less practical in the rockier singletrack.

    My old 2011 Kona Unit won't take bigger rear and would need a new rim on the front to go wider.
    An N+1 2012 Giant Anthem was cheaper

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SingleSpeedSteven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    417
    Quote Originally Posted by NordieBoy View Post
    2.35" on rigid is the biggest I've gone.
    I found 50 years old is when it becomes less practical in the rockier singletrack.

    My old 2011 Kona Unit won't take bigger rear and would need a new rim on the front to go wider.
    An N+1 2012 Giant Anthem was cheaper
    2.35 seems to be my sweet spot for skinnies. There's a lot of fast rolling, really nice tires in that size and its very versatile in terms of use between daily riding, training and racing. I tried 2.6s and thought they felt like an awkward in between on a rigid bike. It felt like I either needed to go back to full 29+ or back to faster rolling skinnies.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    833
    I've run 29x3.0 and 29x2.6 as well as a number of more typical, smaller sizes on rigid SS. Given the choice, I will NEVER choose anything smaller than 2.6. I have found it to be faster in nearly every condition found in actual mountain biking and FAR more comfortable and capable. It is literally life changing it is that good for me. YMMV.

    FYI this is only as a front tire as the frames I own cannot take more than 2.4" in the rear.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    944
    A bit of truth that I remember reading on here at some point was that tire size will not substitute suspension.

    A rigid bike will be a rigid bike whether you are on 2.35 or 4.8. You'll gain some squish, sure, but IME you'll still feel like you're riding a rigid bike.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    944
    double post

  66. #66
    Ahhh the pain....
    Reputation: Raybum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,527
    I've been riding a rigid SS for a number of years and have come to love the 29x3 Chupacabra (11 psi). I run it on a 30mm inner width carbon rim and have raced (and won) w/ it. But, I too suffer from the visual blur that occurs at speed in the rough stuff...I've had to go back to a suspension fork for XC races or I just lose too much time on the downhills.The best rigid riding advice I can give.-img_2871.jpg

  67. #67
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    I've been playing with a DHR+ 3.0 on the front of my Vertigo when I'm feeling randy. It's super donkey awesome compared to anything less than 2.6. So burly and fun.

    Also, not the hammer for all the nails. You can feel this tire at XC speeds and especially while climbing.

    I even rode the lift assisted bike park stuff at Snowshoe on it... and I'm pretty sure I was the only rigid single speed on the lifts that day.



    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3¢ every time I post on MTBR.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,266
    That 2nd pic is one of my favorites for today!
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

Similar Threads

  1. Brodie eXpresso - help identify year and give advice on forks
    By datmony in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-11-2014, 09:22 AM
  2. Since when did riding rigid become fully rigid?
    By TiGeo in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 07-30-2013, 12:35 PM
  3. Help Identify My GT and Give Advice???
    By shan1784 in forum GT
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-17-2013, 09:17 PM
  4. Completely new to MTB, please give advice.
    By Cpt_Haddock in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 06-06-2012, 06:27 AM
  5. Give advice for dealing with dogs
    By gillotte in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 11-20-2011, 07:31 PM

Members who have read this thread: 101

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.