bent a thick steel SS cog- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    bent a thick steel SS cog

    I had a 20t Singleworks cog (thick base and steel) on my hub when it threw the chain twice during a climb. I tightened my sliders because I thought I was dropping the chain because it was too loose, but then drive train make horrible noises for the rest of the ride. When I got home, I noticed that the cog had a nasty bend in it.

    In the interest of preventing future occurances like this, how on Earth did that happen? Too much POWER? not likely in my case.

    Technique for straightening it out? What is a stronger replacement that isn't stupid-expensive?

  2. #2
    nothing to see here
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    Sounds like poor chainline and maybe a loose lockring. Surly cog ftw.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  3. #3
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    A stone or branch caught between the chain and sprocket perhaps? As above, I think that you'd do well to bend a Surly sprocket.

  4. #4
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    I'm pretty sure I got a stone between chain and cog once, and the chain was the part that broke. I'd check chainline, spacers, and lockring.
    Surly cogs have been mentioned, I'm happy with my wide base On-One cogs.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  5. #5
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    Surly cogs are heavy for sure. I got a new niner aluminum cog and on my last ride I got a stick wedged between it and the chain. I didn't do any damage though. I would think it would take some sort of impact to bend it.

  6. #6
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    chain line was dead-on within one millimeter of perfect. I took pains to get it just right. lockring was tight as hell, had to really wrestle it off.

    here is an old thread about the cog I was using- http://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/s...gs-797180.html not much more information about it though. seems to be every bit as thick as a Surly cog so I am not sure I am willing to pay two times as much for the same thing.

  7. #7
    bike tester
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    don't worry about it... chalk it up as a freak accident, replace the damaged parts and move on.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    chain line was dead-on within one millimeter of perfect. I took pains to get it just right. lockring was tight as hell, had to really wrestle it off.

    here is an old thread about the cog I was using- http://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/s...gs-797180.html not much more information about it though. seems to be every bit as thick as a Surly cog so I am not sure I am willing to pay two times as much for the same thing.
    You get what you pay for? Surly cogs are only 30 bucks. That's not very high. Now you got to buy another cog. Do the math. 15 bucks (according to you) X2 equals the price of one surly.

  9. #9
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    Surly cogs are nuke proof. I doubt anyone has the leg strength to bend it.

    It could have smacked a big rock during the ride, hitting it laterally on flat face side. But even then, I'm not sure that would bend it. They are very tough (and heavy) cogs.

    I'd say they are worth every penny. I love my Surly cog!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjphillips View Post
    Surly cogs are nuke proof. I doubt anyone has the leg strength to bend it.

    It could have smacked a big rock during the ride, hitting it laterally on flat face side. But even then, I'm not sure that would bend it. They are very tough (and heavy) cogs.

    I'd say they are worth every penny. I love my Surly cog!
    I recently broke a tooth off of an alloy cog in a race. My guess is that something like a rock got sucked in.

    In the rare case where a rock gets sucked into a cog something needs to give. The rock, cog tooth, or chain are all in play. Something must break. Loosing a tooth is the best option because the system will still run fine. On the other hand a broken chain or bent cog totally sucks because you need to stop and get out your tools. So for something like this a broken tooth is actually a good thing.

  11. #11
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    I have been using the On One's too, nice wide base, tough cromo, good price.

    On-One Groove Armada Single Speed Sprocket | Planet X

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by febikes View Post
    I recently broke a tooth off of an alloy cog in a race. My guess is that something like a rock got sucked in.

    In the rare case where a rock gets sucked into a cog something needs to give. The rock, cog tooth, or chain are all in play. Something must break. Loosing a tooth is the best option because the system will still run fine. On the other hand a broken chain or bent cog totally sucks because you need to stop and get out your tools. So for something like this a broken tooth is actually a good thing.
    Mark, Thats a good point. Something to consider.

  13. #13
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    wow singleworks cogs are very heavy duty maybe it was "too much power" haha. febikes makes some very good points something has to give

  14. #14
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    I can second the On-One sprockets as being good value, although currently I'm using Chris King (which are also nice).

    Why do you US guys always refer to them as "cogs" BTW? (serious question) I'm just curious where this whole cog thing came from, as cogs they're certainly not.

  15. #15
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    Among bmx riders, a front ring is called a "sprocket" (they don't use chainrings) so that's a sprocket. What else would you call it?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Among bmx riders, a front ring is called a "sprocket" (they don't use chainrings) so that's a sprocket. What else would you call it?
    BMX riders refer to chainwheels and sprockets - like here for example.

    If I moved in those circles then I'd be calling the one on the rear wheel a rear wheel sprocket, to avoid confusion - like on a motorcycle, where you have gearbox sprockets and rear wheel sprockets.

    Because they are sprockets and not cogs, as they engage with a roller chain and not another of their own kind, as cogs do.

    Britain and America "two countries divided by a common language....."

  17. #17
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    Using a Singleworks on my bike right now, no issues so far and a clyde at that. FWIW I thought the machining on the Singleworks was better quality than the Surly cogs that I've used, but both should be bulletproof.

  18. #18
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    The name didn't click until I clicked the link and looked at a picture. I use their track sprockets on my fixed gear. I'd chalk it up to what most everyone else is saying: freak accident. They're Hawley's house brand, if I remember correctly.

    Depending on where you got it, I suppose you might have gotten a knockoff, but that would be a bit like counterfeiting pennies.

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