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Thread: Belt Drive

  1. #1
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    Belt Drive

    Hey I have been looking around the internet and this forum and cant find if there is a kit to convert a bike to accept a belt drive. I understand that you need to cut a hole in the rear triangle and most of the people here seem to make their own conversion. I couldn't so that without some guidance so any help is appreciated. P.S. i don't have a frame or anything I am just curious how it works.
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  2. #2
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    When in doubt, Wiki it:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belt-driven_bicycle

    And you don't cut a "hole". Just need an opening in the frame to slip the belt through.

  3. #3
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    It really depends on the frame, I have seen people put an S&S coupler in the seatstay or the chainstay. I have also seen people with horizontal dropouts cut a slot in the dropout where the seatstay and chainstay connect. They then drill and tap 4 holes in the dropout itself and bolt anouther dropout on top of it.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=590389

    As far as the belt components go, several companies are making conversion kits.
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  4. #4
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    First you need to ensure that the frame you wish to use has enough clearance for the thicker and larger front beltring. A lot of frames have chainstays which bend out past the chainring for large tyre clearance.
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  5. #5
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    first you need to realize that keeping it how it is and using a chain is the smartest idea.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cr45h
    first you need to realize that keeping it how it is and using a chain is the smartest idea.
    I been there with the belt and agree with this succinct statement.

  7. #7
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    Try this link. This is one of the guys in our club who just converted his Raleigh XXIX. He does have a background in frame building though.

    www.bramba.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=3614

  8. #8
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    Elevated chainstays my friends, it's the wave of the future...

    OK, I realize it's not 1991 anymore, but this would seem like an easy solution.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2xPneu
    I been there with the belt and agree with this succinct statement.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlienSP
    Elevated chainstays my friends, it's the wave of the future...

    OK, I realize it's not 1991 anymore, but this would seem like an easy solution.
    I have done a number of conversions, including one on an elevated chainstay bike.

    The problem with the elevated chainstay I used was that the chainstay was too flexible so the belt tended to derail. I fixed that with a snubber pulley, but that was adding complexity which I was trying to avoid.

    In short, I think elevated chainstays could work, but it would have to be a new design so that it could be made stiff enough.

    As far as the negative comments on belt drive I have seen, most problems can be fixed. I think some of the production belt drive bikes are likely to have problems because their chainstays look no different from chain drive bikes, in which case they will be too flexible.

    Other production belt drive bikes have overly complex methods of splitting the rear triangle for belt insertion. It is almost as if the manufacturers are in competition to come up with the most unnecessarily "technical" method.

    My findings are that with proper alignment, stiff chainstays, and a stout joint, that the belt does not need much more tension than a chain.

    If you are considering doing a conversion it is best to start with a bike that has been designed for arduous single speed use because it is more likely to have sufficient stiffness in the chainstays.
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