Beating a Dead Topic; Rigid or Suspension?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Its too warm here....
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    Beating a Dead Topic; Rigid or Suspension?

    Ok guys,

    Building up the cheapish SS and need some logical input. I can get a decent, older 4" travel fork for the same price as a Surly 1x1 fork. I normally ride a hardtail with a 4" fork, haven't ridden rigid in a while. I am young enough, so I think I could take it no problem, but what would you do?

    Squish Squish vs. Rattle Rattle

    Point & Shoot vs. Pick a Line

    The Norm vs. F.U.S.S.Y.

    Help me out!

    Thanks,

    Pedro
    "Speak softly and carry a big stick." T.R. Roosevelt

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    I've ridden rigid for three years now, after quite a few years on suspension.

    With skill, even rocky, rooted trails can be taken at a pretty good cilp on a rigid fork.

    That being said, I've gotten into racing, and I'm saving my pennies for a Fox F100X. I think it's the best of both worlds. Rigid out of the saddle on climbs, plush on the downs (at least after that first hit), without having to dick around with a lockout lever.

    If you're young with a strong upper body, you can cope, and you'll learn a whole bunch trying to keep up with your buddies on their dual suspension bikes.

    I just don't think rigid is the fastest way from point A to point B. It is fun however

  3. #3
    KgB
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    If you are going rigid

    You may consider a more forgiving fork than the Surly or the cheap LBS takeoffs.
    I got a ritchey at my LBS for 60 that I have been using over three years.
    I've been inside too long.

  4. #4
    Out spokin'
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    Not a dead topic

    Not a dead topic at all.

    Personally, I have a rigid fork and a 5" fork, and can switch back and forth between them in about 10 minutes. There are trails out here that are definitely more fun with one than the other. Sometimes the length of the ride comes to bear on the decision as well (epics on a rigid can sorta get to a feller.)

    That said, since I bought the rigid fork last year, it's been on my singlespeed about 90% of the time.

    Never thought I'd hear myself say that.

    --Sparty

    Quote Originally Posted by SenorPedro
    Squish Squish vs. Rattle Rattle
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    switch

    I have a moncog w/stock fork. On almost every ride, I like the rigid. It forces me to pick better lines and I feel that it is making me a smoother rider regardless of what I am on. That being said, last weekend I did a 3 hour ride at an area that was nothing but ups and downs, roots and logs. I had to drive home with the steering wheel between my teeth and my wife had to spoon feed me my dinner. So in preperation for harmonic convergence, I swapped the 100mm bomber from my hardtail. I think the stock fork is corrected for 80mm, but I rode it for an hour on Sat and it felt ok.
    Moral of the story...It only takes a few minutes to swapand each has it's place, so maybe look at both...Good Luck

  6. #6
    Its too warm here....
    Reputation: SenorPedro's Avatar
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    Didn't mean "dead" per se

    Thanks for the advice.

    I meant beating a dead topic as in "beating a dead horse" because I know its been brought up quite a bit, not that its a dead topic

    ADVISE ON...

    thanks
    "Speak softly and carry a big stick." T.R. Roosevelt

  7. #7
    Paintbucket
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    I just restarted riding my old bike with a rigid fork on it a couple of weeks ago. What amazes me most is how it goes exactly where I want it to go. Now that's what I call point and shoot. Sure makes picking your line a lot less hassle than you might think from trying the same thing on a sussy fork....
    Zippy for president

  8. #8
    Not because I'm fast.....
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    Rigid is a blast, I say go for it!

    After you learn to ride with a rigid fork, you can be pretty darn fast too! I use the $65 Dimension disc fork on my 1x1 and I love it.

  9. #9
    Totally, and to the max.
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    Rigid for me from now on...

    ...on my singlespeed that is. I have a Spicer ti fork on an Airborne Ti Hag, a scant 19 lb. setup. The combination results in a supple rocket of a trail scalpel. It is the fastest, most accurate bike I've ever ridden. The stiffness of the bike allows the tires to grab everything, everwhere from wet roots to way off camber halftrack–and hold its tread. On the contrary, my other bike, a Jericho 1x9 with a Fox Talas is a fast, smooth ride that floats better, but does not feel nearly as precise. I'm not immediately clued in to when I'm losing traction, and this aspect is hugely important at high speeds, thru mud and redwood trees.

    Oh, the rigid fork climbs way better too.

  10. #10
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    diehard rigid rider waffles on a bit...

    Take all my advice with care - I managed to sidestep the suspension revolution altogether and have been almost exclusively riding rigid for... (counts fingers)... 17 years - so my perspective is a bit skewed ;-)

    I'd recommend going rigid - but if you haven't ridden rigid a lot in the past then you might find you need to persevere with it a bit to re-learn the riding styles that suspension irons out of you. It'll come back to you but I know quite a few people who've switch to rigid and switch back to sus... mostly because they don't want to ride differently than they did, or because they enjy the sus style more. Give it a while, don't go switching between the two too much until you're happy with riding rigid.. then you'll know whether it's something you enjoy or not.

    I know people who like to ride rigid every now and again, but get bored/tired of it after a while. I ride sus every now and again but get bored of it after one ride normally... which is why my geary hardtail with 80mm forks has been ridden less than 1/2 a dozen times in two years! I just love the you can pop a rigid fork up of any little rise or nicely angled rock... makes you feel like a human mountain goat!

    And there's a big variety in the ride of rigid forks as well... and some of them are just ugly lumps of steel. But you can by some of the best rigid forks for the price of some of the cheapest sus forks. I know which I prefer riding ;-)

    (Currently on Pace RC30s but likely to change to either Kellys or On-One titaniums in the near future - I need to be running disks by next winter)

    fully rigid, one gear (always the same gear).. no excuses (apart from the ones for getting of and walking!) and no complications



    Quote Originally Posted by SenorPedro
    Ok guys,

    Building up the cheapish SS and need some logical input. I can get a decent, older 4" travel fork for the same price as a Surly 1x1 fork. I normally ride a hardtail with a 4" fork, haven't ridden rigid in a while. I am young enough, so I think I could take it no problem, but what would you do?

  11. #11
    USB Rep'n
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    Hey bud. I have had this same debate going on in my head for a while now too. So far, I have stuck to suspension because of the way I ride. I feel rigid would limit what I enjoy doing so Im going to wait unitl I can build up a SC Chameleon (or similar) for jumping/park/urban and run suspension there. If I keep the Blizzard at that point, I'll probably try rigid on that bike for xc and see how it goes. One thing for you to consider though, if you are talking simialr priced forks for your new ride, I'd imagine that the suspension fork might leave a bit to be desired as far as performance. That said, if I were you, I'd get the rigid, 100mm corrected to slacken things a bit, and a big fat front tire. I think it'll be less of a hassle than constantly working on an old fork which will be tough to find parts for when you need em.

    I hope this is a little useful but it sthe best I have right now. BTW, those brakes oughta be there today, hope they work out. Be sure to post s shot of the bike once your done!

    Hope all is well. Peace and light.

    Scott
    though hope is frail, it must prevail - Taj Weekes

    betam eh-wud-eh-HA-lehu y
    eh-nay Ityopia!

  12. #12
    lux
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    Pedro -- I have two SS. One with a rigid fork and one squishy. I like 'em both, but for different reasons. My rigid gives me the most feel of the terrain, the most responsive steering -- seems like I can get in a lot more trouble and get away with it on the rigid. My squishy I like cause I can haul ass and jump more without wrecking my wrists so much, and for longer rides I appreciate all those bumps being soaked up.

    So, my advice is to build as many bikes as you can in the shortest amount of time and ride ever' damn one of them till the wheels fall off.

    lux

  13. #13
    34N 118W
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    I say try it and see for yourself. I recently gave it a go and was surprised how non-rattle rattle it was. If it sucks, save for a new sus. fork. I'm also using wide carbon bars and cushy Oury grips

    HW


    Quote Originally Posted by SenorPedro
    Squish Squish vs. Rattle Rattle

  14. #14
    Steamroller
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    Sus cuz it hurts less

    I'm riding suspension because after one too many separated shoulders it just feels better the next day. I would not ride suspension without a lock-out, though I've not tried Propedal or SPV. Those are real pricey and I'm partial to my Bombers. Loving my MX Pro 105 which still has about 1" of travel when locked out.
    Two Wheeled and Too Big

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