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Thread: Bash Guard?

  1. #1
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    Bash Guard?

    I have never ridden with a bashguard but my new Kona Unit came with one stock. Out of the box I upgraded to a Rotor Q Ring. Looking for opinions on whether to keep the bashguard or drop a little weight? In the past all my singlespeed chainrings have been steel.

  2. #2
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    Does Rotor produce round chain rings or just the elongated/biopace style ones? If not, I'm afraid the Q-ring won't work.

  3. #3
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    Q-ring works great. Even fits fine under the 34t bashguard. My question has more to do with who is using a bashguard ans wether an aluminum ring is strong enough on its own. Q-ring costs a few pennies that is the only reason it is releant. Thanks.

  4. #4
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    how do you deal with tight and loose spots in the chain?
    I think i'm going to start pulling my rings that dont pass inspection for roundness out of the scrap bin and call them HBC factor, and charge a premium for them.

    As for the bash ring, that's up to you. What steel rings did you run before? If they were stainless, then most likely the aluminum ring will be stronger as aluminum has a higher yield strength than most stainless steels.

  5. #5
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    I have had luck as well as others who I know who have used them. I am a fairly new convert. I made it up climbs I have walked before in equal gearing. It is a new year but this seems like a good argument to me. Thanks for the positive feedback about aluminum. Makes me feel better about shaving a few grams


    From Rotor FAQ re tension -->


    Q-Rings will work without the need for a tensioning device.

    When using a Q-Ring on a single speed bike, position the crank between 3 & 4 o’clock (largest part of the Q-Rings will facing up) and then tighten the chain the same as you would on a round ring. Because the effective tooth size is a gradual change, and not that extreme, you will be able to ride in tough terrain without the chain failing on you.

    You will obviously have a small change in tension if you’re feet are at 12 & 6 o’clock, but when going downhill you’re feet will likely be positioned at 3 & 9 o’clock (highest tension). Therefore, the only time you’ll be at 6 & 12 o’clock is when you are pedaling, which means that you will be applying pressure on the chain at this point.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    ...my rings that dont pass inspection for roundness...
    Do you have rings which doesn't pass inspection for roundness? If so, why not sell them at a discount, or as ornaments?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Do you have rings which doesn't pass inspection for roundness? If so, why not sell them at a discount, or as ornaments?
    I thought about it. They'd actually be great for a 1x9 setup or one with a spring tensioner.

  8. #8
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    Considering how out of ring stock rings can be and still work fine, it should work nicely. Getting any money out of them would be better than getting no money out of them.

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