Are barends a good SS thing?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: The Berryman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    194

    Are barends a good SS thing?

    I know lots of SS dudes and dudettes routinely use riser bars on their SS to get a little more leverage when doing out of the saddle climbing. But can I get the same effect from using barends? I do not see many pictures of SSpeeds with barends. Is the lack of barends just a style thing? Or are they not as effective when trying to torque up on your handlebars for leverage?

  2. #2
    uncompliant
    Reputation: JonathanB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    43

    Style's got something to do with it...

    ... at least in part (and with good reason ;-)), but I wouldn't trust bar ends to stay put with the sort of leverage you could be putting on them when cranking ss out of the saddle. Also I don't think the further forward aspect of barends feels right when really cranking - I like to feel that my bars are closer to my body if anything.

    I'd like to try some of Jones' H-bars though - as an interesting middle ground.

    Jonathan


    Quote Originally Posted by The Berryman
    I know lots of SS dudes and dudettes routinely use riser bars on their SS to get a little more leverage when doing out of the saddle climbing. But can I get the same effect from using barends? I do not see many pictures of SSpeeds with barends. Is the lack of barends just a style thing? Or are they not as effective when trying to torque up on your handlebars for leverage?

  3. #3
    formerly Giantxc
    Reputation: MrXC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    649

    Good job! Barends and SS, perfect together

    Barends work great on an SS, particularly when combined with a wider bar (riser or flat). My personal preference is a Titec Flat Tracker bar with Serfas Stablizer bar ends (the ones that are centered on the bar instead of in front of it). I've had no problems over-torquing the bar ends to the point where they move.

    I couldn't car less what the fashion police say about them, I like them. Heck, I like bar ends so much that I use them on my SS road bike too!

    Quote Originally Posted by The Berryman
    I know lots of SS dudes and dudettes routinely use riser bars on their SS to get a little more leverage when doing out of the saddle climbing. But can I get the same effect from using barends? I do not see many pictures of SSpeeds with barends. Is the lack of barends just a style thing? Or are they not as effective when trying to torque up on your handlebars for leverage?

  4. #4
    Is that Bill rated?
    Reputation: Lord Humongous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    440

    Yes and no

    In order to climb on a singlespeed you need to recruit the muscles in your back and arms to keep your body from lifting off the bike. The actions involved are fairly similar to seated rows as performed in a wieght training gym. If you look at the equipment available for these types of exercises you will see that as the bar becomes wider the lifters thumbs are encouraged to point towards each other and as the bar becomes narrower the thumbs are encouraged to point forwards.
    The difference in pulling strength across this spectrum is nominal with the major difference being range of motion; wider bars allow a greater range of motion than narrow bars. Climbing on a bicycle involves a short range of motion in the back and arms so the adavantage of wide placement is lessened. In practise a narrow bar with barends will provide the same biomechanincal advantage as a wide bar.
    That said there are other advantages to the wide bar such as descending and technical handling which the narrow bar with barends does not provide. Personally I find that a bar with sufficient width to give me the pulling stength I require is a disadvantage in the dense trees on my local trails so I prefer the narrower (24") bar with barends.
    Well, it was a good try.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: The Berryman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    194
    Yah, that makes sense as to why riser bars are better than bar ends for SSing.

    With bar ends your weight gets slightly out further over your front wheel. Therefore when standing to climb your rear wheel can come unweighted and slip. I noticed that the barends help when I am yanking up on the handlebars, but I have to make an effort to get my body back as far as possible.

  6. #6
    Ebo
    Ebo is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,730
    Quote Originally Posted by The Berryman
    I know lots of SS dudes and dudettes routinely use riser bars on their SS to get a little more leverage when doing out of the saddle climbing. But can I get the same effect from using barends? I do not see many pictures of SSpeeds with barends. Is the lack of barends just a style thing? Or are they not as effective when trying to torque up on your handlebars for leverage?
    Wide flat bars (Salsa Pro Moto's 26") with bar ends (Titec Shorties) for me equals perfect for climbing.

  7. #7
    Appalachian Singletrack'n
    Reputation: Endomaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,437
    I run a 26” bar with Cane Creek Ergo ends. The Cane Creeks are very versatile you can pull in-front of, in-line with, or behind the handlebar. The shape feels great in my hand. I really prefer this to a regular riser bar on my SS the bar end feeling is home to me like holding onto the brake hoods. A friend took my SS for a test ride the other day and his main comment after trying it out was how cool the bar ends where. That being said I don’t like them on my geared bike where I run a 28” riser bar instead.

  8. #8
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,657

    Style

    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanB
    ... but I wouldn't trust bar ends to stay put with the sort of leverage you could be putting on them when cranking ss out of the saddle. Also I don't think the further forward aspect of barends feels right when really cranking - I like to feel that my bars are closer to my body if anything. Jonathan
    Riser bars are currently in style, but what's funny about this is that risers were in style when I started riding mountain bikes (1985), then became passé once flat bars were introduced. Then the risers came back in the late 90's. Funny because style is just a big circle; if you have something that is out of style, all you have to do is hang onto it long enough and it'll become the height of fashion once again. All that's required is patience. So personally I'm no slave to fashion, I'd rather go with whatever works best for me.

    In my case that's flat bars and bar ends.


    I've never had a bar end slip, and I weigh close to 200# and have done many rides that include mileage far in excess of 50 miles and well over 10,000' of gain and descent. I would no more expect my bar ends to slip than I'd expect my stem or wheels to slip. This is a matter of buying quality products and proper adjustment.

    I do think that the taller a rider is, the greater the benefit (s)he receives from utilizing a cockpit that can expand upon standing up (or even just when (s)he wants to stretch out). That's a body-to-bike-size percentage thing, if that makes sense. Anyway, I use my bar ends constantly and cannot understand those who choose to do without them, though I respect everyone's personal choice.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

Similar Threads

  1. to SS or not? that is the question
    By Nimai in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-28-2004, 11:46 AM
  2. Disc SS hubs, what's good?
    By Angus in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-10-2004, 09:36 PM
  3. should i go ss and HOW?
    By steve0512 in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-09-2004, 07:40 PM
  4. Reversals can be a good thing...
    By fred3 in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-22-2004, 07:12 PM
  5. When a reverse arch fork is not such a good thing
    By Yeti_Rider in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-02-2004, 11:10 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.