Bar ends: perfect for SS?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Bar ends: perfect for SS?

    So, I went against the grain and to the dismay of my riding partners I threw on a pair of discreet (small) barends. I run a 32/16 gear on my converted stumpy and some of the very steep stuff around here was defeating me. No longer. My climbing has really improved. The barends allow me better leverage and balance and what I really notice is that they open up my lungs because of the wider grip they afford. This translates to more powert to the pedals on the challenging steep stuff. I cleaned a trail (Brownie Lake) here last night with lots of very steep ascents for the first time on my single. So my question is, why don't I see more barends on single speeds? Seems like a match made in heaven to me.

  2. #2
    blame me for missed rides
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    because they already have very wide bars.

  3. #3
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    I've been running the Cane Creek Ergo's and I LOVE them. You are right in that they offer so much more leverage on climbing, whether in or out of the saddle. I just saw an advertisement of Cane Creeks that actually has the bar end/grip as a combined piece.

    And I think people worry too much about other peoples opinions, that's why you don't see more people with ends.
    .....but good luck with that.

  4. #4
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    Cane Creek Ergos

    I run an ea70 monkeylite with Cane Creek ergos which aadd another cm at each end and agree that it couldn't be better. I find the hand position when standing to be better and its also nice to have some variety of hand position on the longer rides.
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  5. #5
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    Cane Creek Ergo II's....

    ... I see a trend here.
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  6. #6
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    I was running Scott AT-2 bars on my beater conversion, and I liked them. When I bought a dedicated single speed I went with the Mary bars. They obviate the need for bar ends.

  7. #7
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    I'm a slave to public opinion...

    Quote Originally Posted by MACK1
    And I think people worry too much about other peoples opinions, that's why you don't see more people with ends.
    Either that or the trails where I ride are too likely to snag a bar end and create an unplanned dismount. 20 mph to an instantanious dead stop hurts.

    For the benefit of Twisted Crank: This is only my opinion based on how and where I ride. Perhaps this indicates a lack of ability on my part. Perhaps if I were a better rider, I could ride with bar ends.

    Ken

  8. #8
    I am Walt
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    Cane Creek Ergo's

    I also have Cane Creek Ergo bar ends on my Sun Ringle aluminum riser bar. They help immensely when climbing and offer some variety in hand position. I know it's "uncool" to use them on a riser bar, but don't care - works well for me. Also, I went with an aluminum riser bar because I've previously wrecked a carbon bar with these.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    I also have Cane Creek Ergo bar ends on my Sun Ringle aluminum riser bar. They help immensely when climbing and offer some variety in hand position. I know it's "uncool" to use them on a riser bar, but don't care - works well for me. Also, I went with an aluminum riser bar because I've previously wrecked a carbon bar with these.
    I agree on the Cane Creeks. My first use with them was the Brian Head 50. Love 'em...especially on my SS...
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  10. #10
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    I saw one of your impromptu dismounts...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    Either that or the trails where I ride are too likely to snag a bar end and create an unplanned dismount. 20 mph to an instantanious dead stop hurts.

    Ken
    Luckily for me when I bounced on my head I was 500m behind you.

  11. #11
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    I've been running Scott AT-2's for my last three SS's and love them. I've tried risers, etc, but prefer the leverage of the AT-2's. Quite frankly they're not that good looking, I like the way risers look way better, but when it comes to riding I am mostly about function... and I really prefer the function of my steer horns. Ride what works for you.

    Wardo

  12. #12
    el cheapo
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    I just made the switch from some older Profile Tomac bar ends, which served me well and always gave me the necessary leverage, to the Scott AT-2 bar and I LOVE it, I even put some orange grip tape on there in the military tradition of operational test equipment. So far though its a match made in heaven!!
    I am CHEAP

  13. #13
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    Sounds like other people's experience has been similar although I don't use the Cane Creekers. I went with a set of Post Modern Microlites. 56 grams for the pair. Maybe the benefit for me has been more pronounced in that I don't ride with riser bars. I like my center of gravity low so use straight bars and so barends are probably appreciated more for me with this setup on the climbs. For the twisty trails I ride risers aren't worth the price of a taller center of gravity and compromised cornering so the barends/straight bar combo fits the bill. Maybe it's just my experience but the lower I can get on the front end the more I can get my front tire to hookup in the sharp turns. At least now I know I'm not the only one out there with barends.

  14. #14
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    I'm a bar end believer

    Bar ends rule. I've been using bar ends since the late 80's. My fav's are the early version (ie: aluminum as opposed to steel) Specialized Dirt Rodz. These are "L" bend bar ends that tend to not snag on saplings due to their inward turn, but thankfully they're also petite (I hate the huge, multi-shaped bar ends popularized by companies like Cannondale back in the day). Anyway the Dirt Rodz also afford some knuckle protection and I like that.

    I haven't used riser bars since they were popular in the mid-80's. For cosmetic reasons I prefer wide flat bars like my Salsa Pro Motos in conjunction with an appropriate-rise stem. This system looks tough sitting still plus people usually can't see my handlebar setup while I'm passing them anyway.

    --Sparty


    Quote Originally Posted by Axis II
    So... why don't I see more barends on single speeds? ...
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Bar ends rule. I've been using bar ends since the late 80's. My fav's are the early version (ie: aluminum as opposed to steel) Specialized Dirt Rodz. These are "L" bend bar ends that tend to not snag on saplings due to their inward turn, but thankfully they're also petite (I hate the huge, multi-shaped bar ends popularized by companies like Cannondale back in the day). Anyway the Dirt Rodz also afford some knuckle protection and I like that...

    --Sparty
    ...and prevent taking core samples of your chest when you crash on the end of the bar!
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  16. #16
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    Oh, yeah...

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    ...and prevent taking core samples of your chest when you crash on the end of the bar!
    ...you witnessed that wreck, didn't you. That bar end just might have saved my life.

    --Sparty
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  17. #17
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    I used to run Onza bar ends "back in the day" and now run Cane Creeks on my SS. I find that they provide more leverage for me to rock the bike side to side on the really steep climbs and also put less of a strain on my wrists.

  18. #18
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    I used Cane Creek Ergo's until I met Mary.


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  19. #19
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    Cane Creek broken record...

    I have them and I love them. I ride a ss.

    One thing to note, they "grab" if you cut it close as opposed to my metal bar ends which slide. Be warned. I have had one incident in many, many years of mtb'ing where a bar end caused me to crash and it was w/ the Canes grabbing a branch and not letting go. It's that comfy rubber.

    I'd always heard/read that bar ends were not necessary when you went riser and wider so I tried riding w/out bar ends for 2 months when I got my Easton, low-rise and wide bar. Prior to that I'd always had bar ends.

    Wrong. After 2 months I put the Ergos on and I had instant relief - more hand positions, more leverage, etc. I had not realized how much I did miss bar ends. I like low profile ones like the Ergos for sure.

    Make sure you try things before writing them off based on what you hear or read.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    ...
    Make sure you try things before writing them off based on what you hear or read.
    Word.

    Saying "You don't need bar ends so long as you run wide riser bars" makes about as much sense as saying "You don't need a saddle so long as you run your chain backwards."

    I've got bikes equipped both ways. I'm not saying everybody should use bar ends, I'm just saying that high, wide bars are no replacement for bar ends.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  21. #21
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    I've got an old set of Stubz bar ends (70g) that I sometimes use on my SS, I've slid them off trees and hung a few but with wide risers its much harder not to hang them. Good on steep climbs, bad in tight woods, maybe I should just get some Jones bars

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1FG rider
    I used to run Onza bar ends "back in the day" and now run Cane Creeks on my SS. I find that they provide more leverage for me to rock the bike side to side on the really steep climbs and also put less of a strain on my wrists.
    Cane Creeks! Cane Creeks! Ca-a-a-a-a-ne Creeks!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenfix
    When I bought a dedicated single speed I went with the Mary bars. They obviate the need for bar ends.
    how?
    by weighing as much as normal bars + bar ends?
    by requiring a new stem? (most of the time)
    by putting your hands closer to your legs?

  24. #24
    I am Walt
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    Couple guys I ride with run Mary's and LOVE them. Big time. Particularly for long rides/races.

    (SS-ers, of course...)
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  25. #25
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    Everything is a compromise. I like bars and bar ends. The problem I have with them in my terrain is switching positions from honking on the bar ends to the handlebar in order to brake or shift. My terrain is lots of shortish ups and downs, and it seems as if you can get stuck in the wrong position from time to time.

    While the Mary bars do not offer the primo parrallel-with-the-stem hand position that really allows you to generate leverage, they offer a position that is far superior to straightish bars for leverage. So, you give a bit in the leverage department relative to bar ends, but your shifters and brakes are right where you need them.

    Remember back in the day there was a company that made these devices that attached to your brake levers so that you could brake from the bar ends?

    Happy Trails,
    B

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    Make sure you try things before writing them off based on what you hear or read.
    what makes you think those who claim otherwise have not tried both options?

  27. #27
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    Nothing...

    Quote Originally Posted by weather
    what makes you think those who claim otherwise have not tried both options?
    All I was saying was try it for yourself if you have not tried both options.

  28. #28
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    I was using the Cane's for a while....loved them on the climbs, but didnt' dig my hand positions for the decents. I do have the Uber-wide Azonic 29" bars, and they help a lot.

    And yes, I was fortunete enough to get a 'core sample' of my chest the other day. Not fun. Still sore.
    Moving to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon.

  29. #29
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    Another vote for Cane Creeks

    I've been using the Ergo IIs for about a year now, bought them on a whim and love them. I use them on fairly wide riser bars, don't really care how it looks to others. I got the model that integrates with lock-on grips. I'm out on the ergos for climbing, back on the grips for descents where I need to be close to the brakes, and kind of half in between for crusing. Yeah, I do notice a lot of hand position changing and that's a compromise.
    A couple comments:
    I was surprised at how heavy they are for their size.
    Maybe its all psycological but I feel a sense of security with any bar end that when the going gets rough my hands will have less chance of sliding off the bar, that I don't need a death grip to keep my hands on the grips.

  30. #30
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    I personally love the Mary Bars. More leverage, quick brake access, and inquiring looks on the trail. Dirtrag had an article recently about how the sweep on bars has been getting less and less and how this seems to be very un-ergonomic. After riding the Marys (with all kinds of sweep) I have to say I agree.

  31. #31
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    I use the LP Composite Grips barends on my riser bars, great ergo shape.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDEnvEngr
    Everything is a compromise. I like bars and bar ends. The problem I have with them in my terrain is switching positions from honking on the bar ends to the handlebar in order to brake or shift. My terrain is lots of shortish ups and downs, and it seems as if you can get stuck in the wrong position from time to time.

    While the Mary bars do not offer the primo parrallel-with-the-stem hand position that really allows you to generate leverage, they offer a position that is far superior to straightish bars for leverage. So, you give a bit in the leverage department relative to bar ends, but your shifters and brakes are right where you need them.

    Remember back in the day there was a company that made these devices that attached to your brake levers so that you could brake from the bar ends?

    Happy Trails,
    B
    I used to have a set of those, but they never worked right for me.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axis II
    they open up my lungs because of the wider grip they afford.
    I think the hand position (palms facing each other) contributes to the increased power as much as, if not more than, the increased width. That position points your elbows towards the rear, loosens up your shoulders, and gets your biceps into play more than with a standard bar.

  34. #34
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    I'm going to try a Titec Flat Tracker bar w/ the Cane Creek locking grips and Ergo II bar ends on my G.U.S.S. It's all individual preference, but on a SS, it can be quite helpful on the climbs. My goal is to ride 32x16 everywhere, so I need all the help I can get for the Auburn, CA area!

  35. #35
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    i've done torsion bar with cane creek ergos, nice. risers (all kinds) with no ends, not so nice. currently running mary, and i must say that this is about the best yet. most everything here in slc climbs (a lot) and while it felt a bit funky at first, mary climbed most comfortably; to stay on topic, ergos with torsion bar (rolled slightly fwd) gave me some power and on longer climbs gave me lots-o-options, though smacked me in the head alot when i would carry my bike.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDEnvEngr
    Everything is a compromise. I like bars and bar ends. The problem I have with them in my terrain is switching positions from honking on the bar ends to the handlebar in order to brake or shift. My terrain is lots of shortish ups and downs, and it seems as if you can get stuck in the wrong position from time to time.

    While the Mary bars do not offer the primo parrallel-with-the-stem hand position that really allows you to generate leverage, they offer a position that is far superior to straightish bars for leverage. So, you give a bit in the leverage department relative to bar ends, but your shifters and brakes are right where you need them.
    My experience exactly. I hate the constant changing of hand positions with bar ends, but with a flat bar I've gotte have the bar ends -- especially for standing SS climbs -- or I get major hand pain. Mary solves both problems: no hand pain, and no need to move my hands around all the time. I do feel like my climbing power is diminished slightly, but not enough to make the tradeoff a bad idea.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axis II
    So, I went against the grain and to the dismay of my riding partners I threw on a pair of discreet (small) barends. I run a 32/16 gear on my converted stumpy and some of the very steep stuff around here was defeating me. No longer. My climbing has really improved. The barends allow me better leverage and balance and what I really notice is that they open up my lungs because of the wider grip they afford. This translates to more powert to the pedals on the challenging steep stuff. I cleaned a trail (Brownie Lake) here last night with lots of very steep ascents for the first time on my single. So my question is, why don't I see more barends on single speeds? Seems like a match made in heaven to me.
    Love 'em. SS or gears, flat bars with bar-ends rule.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by grawbass
    I used to have a set of those, but they never worked right for me.
    You mean these?


  39. #39
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    Titec Flat Tracker with Serfas Stablizers (http://mtbr.com/reviews/Bar_End/product_86567.shtml) . They basically put your hands in the same position as the Cane Creeks but without the weight or cush.

    I tried using a wide bar w/o bar ends for 1 ride and found it nowhere near as convenient as bar ends.

  40. #40
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    Bar Ends, yes!

    Was riding a MonkeyLite carbon riser...
    Tried the Jones H-bars...
    Now riding and very happy with a Salsa ProMoto 11 degree bend with Titus Pluto carbon ergo bar ends. Wow! I swore off bar ends and narrow flat bars about 10 years ago, but this changes everything. I can still climb with good leverage and control while on the grips (if I am in a techy spot and need quick access to the brake levers) and then I get ape-like leverage when I get out on the Plutos. The other bonus is the multiple hand positions; a real plus on all the long rides and races I am prone to do.
    I have checked my ego at the door and go with what works and feels best. If they look cool, great, but that is not motivation #1.

    OGG
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