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  1. #1
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    Back hurt!

    Why do my back hurt when i ride SS? 32x18. I have no problem on my gear bike. Thanks

  2. #2
    NardoSS
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  3. #3
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    Because you are soft. Keep riding and it will get better, I would also suggest a lot of ab work, that is usually my first recomendo for anyone with back pain from riding.... You core is weak.

  4. #4
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    Do a search and you will find some long threads on this topic. Make sure you are not hunched over and/or using your back muscles too much when you stand and mash. Also, make sure to stand when you mash because really hard mashing from in the saddle can also stress your back

  5. #5
    never ender
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    Quote Originally Posted by snellvilleGAbiker
    Why do my back hurt when i ride SS? 32x18. I have no problem on my gear bike. Thanks
    Could be any number of things. Get checked out by a good chiropractor, start doing yoga, and keep at it.

  6. #6
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    try and figure out (or better, get it checked out) to determine if it is muscular or neural. symptoms can be 'referred', away from the spine, so diagnosis can be a bit tricky.

    an injured disc pressing on a sciatic nerve needs medical attention and rest. i wouldn't listen to those telling you to ride more until you're pretty sure it's not sciatica.

    i'd hope it is muscular and will heal quickly. good luck.

  7. #7
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    Never go to a chiropractor.

    Going to a chiropractor is like getting a plumber to unclog your pipes. He will get the clog out temporarily.............but you have to figure out why your turds are so huge in the first place ---or your clogs will come back over and over again........

    Just like you wouldnt expect a plumber to figure out your "large turd" problem............you shouldnt expect a chiropractor to figure out whats causing your back issues.

    90% of lower back issues are the result of pelvic tilt being off. In bikers this is mainly a combination of tight hip flexors- tight hamstrings- and weak psoas. Hit the net and figure out the "dynamic" ways of stretching the hip and hamstrings.......and couple that with some excercises that engage and strengthen your psoas muscles......and you probably will be well on your way to pain free SSing.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Do a search and you will find some long threads on this topic. Make sure you are not hunched over and/or using your back muscles too much when you stand and mash. Also, make sure to stand when you mash because really hard mashing from in the saddle can also stress your back
    This is right on. Take it from someone who bulged a disc in their back from pushing the pedals too hard while seated. The fact that my saddle was too high did not help. Bike fit is critical.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  9. #9
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    I had this problem, kept on riding and put myself out for a little bit in the fall. After about 3-4 weeks off the bike I realized hat I was not stretching enough and I had the crappiest flexibility. Now I stretch every morning and before and after every ride. I stretch everything from hamstrings to pecs and I honestly feel awesome and have a much quicker recovery time.
    No compromise.

  10. #10
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    Foam roller. Core strengthening.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by baycat
    Foam roller. Core strengthening.
    Foam roller ... the pain merchant!

  12. #12
    The Knights Who Say "Ni"
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogueturtle
    Never go to a chiropractor.

    Going to a chiropractor is like getting a plumber to unclog your pipes. He will get the clog out temporarily.............but you have to figure out why your turds are so huge in the first place ---or your clogs will come back over and over again........

    Just like you wouldnt expect a plumber to figure out your "large turd" problem............you shouldnt expect a chiropractor to figure out whats causing your back issues.

    90% of lower back issues are the result of pelvic tilt being off. In bikers this is mainly a combination of tight hip flexors- tight hamstrings- and weak psoas. Hit the net and figure out the "dynamic" ways of stretching the hip and hamstrings.......and couple that with some excercises that engage and strengthen your psoas muscles......and you probably will be well on your way to pain free SSing.
    As a practicing chiropractor I take great offence to your statement. I have never had to unclog turds.....

    I absolutely agree with your statement about pelvic tilt, weak and tight muscles, one thing I would have to add to that is sometimes even after our patients do those things they are still left with incredible pain especially if there is a herniated or a leaky disc. Core strenthening is key, but sometimes the spine needs help and that's where chiropractors/physical therapist come in...Strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight ones will only get you so far, find a good chiropractor, marry a great physical therapist (like I did) and things will heal...just give it time..Minimum healing time is 3 months.

  13. #13
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    Love the plumber analogy, rogue!

    +1 for physical therapy, stretching, and planks. I couldn't walk for a couple days after a serious lowback strain (x-ray OK) and these things helped me get back to race shape in a month's time (MRI not indicated by sports med dr). While my leg muscles had matured with training, I had neglected my core... 6'6" and flexible as a 2x4.
    '09 Superfly SS
    '11 SE Stout SS

  14. #14
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    Acupuncture has helped me alot everytime I have knocked my back out of alignment.

  15. #15
    SSolo, on your left!
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogueturtle
    ....90% of lower back issues are the result of pelvic tilt being off. In bikers this is mainly a combination of tight hip flexors- tight hamstrings- and weak psoas. Hit the net and figure out the "dynamic" ways of stretching the hip and hamstrings.......and couple that with some excercises that engage and strengthen your psoas muscles......and you probably will be well on your way to pain free SSing.
    I'm doing core strengthening exercises, stretching....please explain the pelvic tilt and how to optimize it etc.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  16. #16
    aka baycat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    I'm doing core strengthening exercises, stretching....please explain the pelvic tilt and how to optimize it etc.
    Cobra stretch might address the problem of pelvic tilt and is a great stretch before, during and after rides.

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