Avid BB7 set-up help- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Avid BB7 set-up help

    Not strictly a SS issue but I know a lot of you guys use these brakes and I am fitting them to my SS.

    The installation instructions say that the rotor should not be centered in the caliper. My question is - which way should it be offset? The diagram seems to contradict itself. The enlarged view seems to show the rotor closer to the main body of the caliper but the actual picture shows it closer to the inboard (wheel side) pad.

    Maybe it's just me being dumb but I can't decide which way to offset it. Any BB7 experts out there?

    Cheers.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Avid BB7 set-up help-avid-bb7.jpg  


  2. #2
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    check out sram tech on youtube they have great set up videos.

  3. #3
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    Excellent idea! Thanks.

  4. #4
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    i have used this "how-to" from Park Tools: http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=124

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomad9
    Not strictly a SS issue but I know a lot of you guys use these brakes and I am fitting them to my SS.

    The installation instructions say that the rotor should not be centered in the caliper. My question is - which way should it be offset? The diagram seems to contradict itself. The enlarged view seems to show the rotor closer to the main body of the caliper but the actual picture shows it closer to the inboard (wheel side) pad.

    Maybe it's just me being dumb but I can't decide which way to offset it. Any BB7 experts out there?

    Cheers.
    I've got them on all four of my mountain bikes.

    The illustration shows left side as the "outside" of your rotor/wheel and the right is the "inside" of the wheel. I'm not sure what the offset is for, but I usually get it near to that and adjust the pads as I'm looking over the rotor to make sure the "outside" pad doesn't flex the rotor too much when you use the lever.

  6. #6
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    I think depending if it is closer or farther from the rotor you get a different "feel". Some of the guys in the "brakes" forum mentioned that in one config you get more modulation...

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the help guys. I found some useful stuff on you tube that has answered my initial question.

    Cheers.

  8. #8
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    Yups and make sure that the rotor does not flex too much or you'll get uneven wear on your brakepads. I did that accidentaly and now I have several pads wich are bare metal on the top and loads of pad material at the bottom.

  9. #9
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    I find the "official" set up doesn't work well. The rotor flexes a lot and on a rigid fork, you get a ton more radial deflection/chatter. When the set up is opposite of what is recommended, everything works awesome. I have mine set up closer to the inboard pad and they work great.

  10. #10
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    x 2 on redwarriors set up. I run the rotor closer to the fixed pad as well and the brakes work great.

  11. #11
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    Regardless of what SRAM says,it seems obvious that you would try to get the rotor as close to the inboard pad as possible since that pad doesn't move. Otherwise you waste energy bending the rotor towards the pad. I can't think of any logical reason why you would want to do otherwise.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29
    Regardless of what SRAM says,it seems obvious that you would try to get the rotor as close to the inboard pad as possible since that pad doesn't move. Otherwise you waste energy bending the rotor towards the pad. I can't think of any logical reason why you would want to do otherwise.
    as already mentioned in this thread, the spacing of the inner pad changes the feel and modulation of the brake, and personal preference over these two things is a logical enough answer for me. Spacing the inboard pad further from the rotor gives the brake a softer feel through a slightly larger portion of the initial lever travel and makes the brake feel less grabby. Again, that is personal preference.

  13. #13
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    dial both levers in until it's locked up, tighten the bolts holding the caliper to the fork/frame, then dial each side out until you get the feel you like.

    (redwarriors etc are right, it's the hot setup for power)
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  14. #14
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    I will tighten each pad just to the point it starts rubbing, and then I'll back it off one click. This gives me the quickest engagement without any rubbing.

  15. #15
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    Not trying to hijack this thread, but while on the topic of BB7's mine howl like a dying rabbit. They're kind of new so it might just be that they're not broken in enough. By the way, it's only the front brake. Any other ideas why it howls?
    "So do me a favor. Find your bike, whatever kind of bike it is. And RIDE it." -Gary Fisher

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singlespeed McGee
    Not trying to hijack this thread, but while on the topic of BB7's mine howl like a dying rabbit. They're kind of new so it might just be that they're not broken in enough. By the way, it's only the front brake. Any other ideas why it howls?
    You might have two reasons for the howling:

    1. There is some contaminant like oil or grease on the rotor or pads. Rubbing alcohol or acetone will clean that up. If its on the pads, you probably will have to replace them.

    2. The pads are not set up right, they are not parallel to the rotor (adjust the mounting bolts to the Avid adaptor) or they are not set up evenly--exactly what this thread is about.

    There isn't a break-in period for these brakes other than a dozen pulls on the brake after you replace the pads.

  17. #17
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    Honestly?
    I just put the pads as close as possible to the rotor without rub. Best braking ever on my bike.
    About the noise, mine used to scream like a teenage girl on a slasher movie on the first 3 or 4 rides. How many miles do you have on yours?

  18. #18
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    The picture above is showing the spacing on the caliper, not the pads. The rotor is off-center towards the outside, to allow it to be deflected during use, without contacting the caliper.

    Pad spacing is more subjective. I like the inboard pad to be very close to the rotor, to give a good solid feel at the levers.
    "If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world."
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  19. #19
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    Some of you are recommending aligning the rotor closer to the inboard side of the caliper, but why would that matter. The outboard pad will wear faster than the inboard, as it is doing the most work. So its alot more reasonable to keep the outboard pad as flexible/adjustable as possible. The brake is prone to allowing the outboard piston to hyperextend when dialed out to far.

    Whether the inboard pad is closer or further from its base position shouldn't really matter. As long as there is little rotor moment when the brake is engaged, both should offer similar performance. Its simply adjusting to see what will happen in the future. When the outboard pad wears a bit and you hyper extend it's piston you will simply need to readjust the calliper to compensate. That's the reason Avid tells you to do a 2/3 and 1/3 partition.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singlespeed McGee
    Not trying to hijack this thread, but while on the topic of BB7's mine howl like a dying rabbit. They're kind of new so it might just be that they're not broken in enough. By the way, it's only the front brake. Any other ideas why it howls?
    try giving the rotor a good cleaning with disc brake cleaner.

  21. #21
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    I have a couple of shims I use to get the clearances right. Just wind the adjusters down tight on them, fasten down the calliper, then loosen adjusters just enough to pull out the shims.

    Means I can set it exactly the same each time. (I know this could be done by counting the clicks too)
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  22. #22
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    Skimmed through the posts, place the rotor closest to the inside( the non piston side.inside) of the caliper, that way the rotor wont flex much and have much better braking surface.

  23. #23
    nothing to see here
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    More inboard wrt the caliper also gives clearance for the adjuster bolts on the caliper. They run very close to the rotor.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  24. #24
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    There is obviosly a reason SRAM and Park both recommend keeping it closer to the outboard pad. Rotor movement can be controlled from the inboard pad, irregardless of where rotor actually is.

  25. #25
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    I could see this being an issue with the BB5 where the fixed inside pad isn't adjustable, but is it really an issue with the BB7 so long as the rotor isn't rubbing anything and is parallel with the caliper?

  26. #26
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    wouldn't think so
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  27. #27
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    Have any of you noticed a difference in performance when switching from the stock rotor to a g2 or g3 rotor?

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