Anyone using the Gear Clamp?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Anyone using the Gear Clamp?

    I came across this when looking for spacers and decided to give them a try. So far they have held up to a couple of six hour races, a few days in the Mountains (NC) and quite a few training rides. The only early problem I encountered is that I did not have them perfectly tight against the cog and it rattled a bit...but that was an easy fix. It is nice to be able to change a cog with just a small 2.5mm wrench and get the chain line just right. I have a bad tendency to switch my gearing up a bit, they have come in very handy.
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    Note: not a paid advertisement, just curious if anyone else is using this product as I could not find any info. in a search.
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  2. #2
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    thanks for the review, I have been curious how these work and would make pre race gear changes extremely simple
    Quote Originally Posted by thefuzzbl
    aluminium has a tendency to fail when you need it most. i.e. you end up with a bad day.

  3. #3
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    What is the smallest cog you have run? Looks like the bolt-on clamp could cause some chain issues with a smaller cogs.
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  4. #4
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    I'm confused, why not just use spacers? Once you've set your chainline once it's set. Unless you've got a bunch of cogs with different base widths but that would be unusual, surely.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by henrymiller
    What is the smallest cog you have run? Looks like the bolt-on clamp could cause some chain issues with a smaller cogs.

    HM-from what I have read, 17t is the smallest but if you use a spacer against the cog on each side you can go smaller

    babau- cog changes would only require a 2.5mm allen key instead of a chain whip and cassette tool or spanner wrench
    Quote Originally Posted by thefuzzbl
    aluminium has a tendency to fail when you need it most. i.e. you end up with a bad day.

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  7. #7
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    *forehead slap*

    Right, makes sense now. Had a brain fart there. Carry on, chaps.

  8. #8
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    On the website it says 16t is the smallest cog due the the allen bolt sticking up. If you go smaller you can use one spacer on each side of the cog (as scooter916 mentioned). I use an 18 most of the time so no worries for me. I found this very helpful in the mountains as I brought a few cogs to see what would work best. I liked being able to get the perfect chain line with no fuss. Also, I have had to switch between wheels when I once broke spokes and another time when getting a set trued. Makes for an easy swap. I like things that make my life easier, hence the single speed in the first place.
    As you can see from my pic. My cog is near the end of my freehub body as I put my chainring on the outside of my cranks (where the large ring or bash guard would go). I had this setup for endurance races as I was not bashing into logs and did not need the guard. When going to the mountains, I put the bashguard on, moved the chainring to its original place (inside of the crankarms) and simply slid the cog and clamps over to the perfect chain line.
    One of my biggest concerns was/is stripping the bolt, but I find it does not need to be very tight and so far, so good. Another concern I had is the exposure of the freehub internals that a lockring usually covers, but so far this has not been an issue so I will keep using this until I decide I want the bling of colored spacers or until I find some other reason to go with something different.
    If interested the website is simply www.gearclamp.com
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  9. #9
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    That's a pretty cool idea. I would go for one of those if I switched my gears more often, but maybe I don't switch my gears often enough because I don't have one. Confusing
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  10. #10
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    $25 or $500? its an easy choice
    Quote Originally Posted by thefuzzbl
    aluminium has a tendency to fail when you need it most. i.e. you end up with a bad day.

  11. #11
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    That's an interesting idea, but there have been portable tools on the market for decades to remove a hyperglide lockring on the side of the trail.

    Like the Pamir Hypercracker (now out of production)



    and the Stein Hypercracker --

    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/stein-mini-lock/

  12. #12
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    I bought a pair and will be using them on a Ti frame that is back at the manufacturer due to a crack in the frame. They looked very cool though and I'll be happy to post my thoughts.
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  13. #13
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    I have a set and I LOVE them. I use them because I wanted something different, and I like being able to adjust my chainline with my wheel on the bike. I also like being the only one around with a set. I am a big guy at 280#, and no problems yet.

  14. #14
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    I just ordered a set. My chainline is kinda far out there like yours is shown in pic. I run some odd spacers to get out there. I will still probably get some spacers on the inside part for piece of mind in case the piece loosens on a ride.
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    I can see all sorts of copys comming on the market.

  16. #16
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    Just an update. I have been using the Gear Clamp for approximately one and a half years now. Over 4k miles and no problems. Because I compete in a lot of races, from XC to 100 milers to 24hr races, I switch cogs quite a bit. The Gear Clamp sure has made riding a SS even more simple. One thing I have done over the last few months is use spacers on the inside of the cog with the gear clamp on the outside. This has allowed me to use one gear clamp on my training wheel and one on my race wheel...yes, I am that darn lazy (why I ride a SS in the first place).

    Note: Not a paid advertisement, but I would accept another set of gear clamps if the powers that be happen to see this.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMHO View Post
    Just an update. ... use spacers on the inside of the cog with the gear clamp on the outside. ...
    Now THIS seems like a great idea. I like the idea that spacers square the cog to the bike's centerline. Then Gear Clamp would serve as sort of a lockring.

    Although I have nothing against spacers & traditional lockring all the way 'round, either.

    I don't change gears much.

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  18. #18
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    This would suit me perfectly because my freehub is externally threaded, and uses a huge lockring which requires the use of a old style threaded headset spanner (about 34-36mm I think).
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  19. #19
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    Very interesting part.
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  20. #20
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    This looks very promising for my build...I wonder if they would save any height space by getting them to look like and ODI grip lock ring...I would guess they tried this configuration but it might allow you to go smaller than a 16


  21. #21
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    I was picturing modding to that as I was reading down the page.

    I don't see why it wouldn't work with a counter sunk 4mm lock nut.

  22. #22
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    First to patent mods wins.

    And ship some to Australia please.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  23. #23
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    Gee. I have been hand tightening my lockrings for years so that I rarely need the chain whip on my bikes. I developed a fear of the chainwhip after losing knuckle skin over and over.
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  24. #24
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    So all my Hope machined spacers have been stolen from my shop... And I need some more. Turns out, a decent spacer kit costs more than these gear clamps....

    So Im gonna try em out. Seems like they are lighter too.

    Would running without a lockring allow more grime to potentially enter the outboard freehub bearing?
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    Would running without a lockring allow more grime to potentially enter the outboard freehub bearing?
    Yeah, but it's going to make it easier to stick a cotton swab in there and clean it out, too.

  26. #26
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    Glad you guys like the GearClamp

    Hi everyone, this is Chris, the inventor/manufacturer of the GearClamp. I'm very happy that you guys like the GC kit!

    Every few months I cruise the internet looking for conversations about the GearClamp, mainly to offer feedback on questions or to solve problems with the parts.

    Regarding making the GearClamps like the ODI grip clamps: the original GearClamp design was very similar to the ODI Lock-On clamps. However, we tested and refined the design and found out the following: First, we made a few ultra lightweight GearClamps using 2mm allen bolts and whittled away at the aluminum until it was as minimal as it could be. We found that those changes in design saved about 30% of the weight of the GearClamps, but people (aka my test riders) thought they looked flimsy. The problem is that using a smaller bolt= easier to strip the threads or the head of the bolt. Using the 3mm allen bolt serves two purposes: first, you will probably strip the head of the bolt before you strip the threads, meaning you only need to get a new bolt and not a new GearClamp (and I provide replacement screws free of charge, just email me). The second reason for the production design is that it's easy to extrude/cut.drill and tap.

    Ive been monkeying around with the design of the GearClamps to allow one to run cogs of less than 16 teeth without spacers, but changing the design would cost me about $1,500.00 in tooling charges. Giving out free spacers (which we also do if you request them) is cheaper. Overall weight savings is still significant over traditional lockring setups.

    Happy riding!

  27. #27
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    Have been using Gear Clamp for about a year and love them. Makes changing gears a quick job and no need for a chain whip and lockring tool.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CB Design View Post
    Hi everyone, this is Chris, the inventor/manufacturer of the GearClamp. I'm very happy that you guys like the GC kit!

    Every few months I cruise the internet looking for conversations about the GearClamp, mainly to offer feedback on questions or to solve problems with the parts...
    I think they're a great invention.



    I use them so I can slide the cogs into line and so I can have a perfect chainline every time. Spacers don't allow this to happen without disassembly.

    My singlespeed is setup with 3 cogs including a small one for when I have a long road transit to get to the trail. I could just use 2 cogs, but there's room for 3, so that's how I set it up, and it gives me a low for mountain passes.

    Edit:

    And just in case some purist comes on to say this is not singlespeed - the reason I put this set up together was because I was intending to ride to the SSEC held in Ireland this year, so a total of well over 500 miles on the road. It meant I was able to eliminate a chainwhip from my tools, which I had already minimised (wingnuts everywhere ). When you're lugging camping gear for several days, anything that can be left out is a bonus.

    Unfortunately I didn't get to do the ride (medical reasons) but I left the GearClamps on anyway, and rode the SSEC with them (not changing gear, though )
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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