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  1. #1
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    New question here. Anyone have A SEVEN?

    I am looking at Seven now as an option, now they offer an EBB. If you could you please post pictures that would be great. Let me know your experiences. Thanks for your input.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I am looking at Seven now as an option, now they offer an EBB. If you could you please post pictures that would be great. Let me know your experiences. Thanks for your input.
    I've got one. However, it's not an EBB, and I have no pictures. I shoved an ENO into the vertical dropout, and it worked like a charm.
    I think Seven has been offering an EBB for quite a while.
    On a general level, great people to work with, great bike frame. Stand by to hear from Hugh, and SSMB7, among others. I feel cheated that I bought a custom frame and missed out on all of those "it'll be ready in a week" quotes for however many months. In fact mine was ready a week early...
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I am looking at Seven now as an option, now they offer an EBB. If you could you please post pictures that would be great. Let me know your experiences. Thanks for your input.
    Ya, I've got one. I've been racing on it for over 3-yrs and I absolutely love it! In fact, it was the first production EBB SS they made. During this time, I've raced countless races and logged way too many training miles to count. Through it all, my Seven just keeps on ticking...well, metaphorically speaking anyway.

    Here's a pic of mine that I took during a winter ride:


    The components and fork have changed over the years, but the frame has remained the same.

    I loved my SS MTB so much, that when I spec'd my SS 'cross bike, I saw no reason not to go back with Seven and the EBB. Here are some pics of my 'crosser:








    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  4. #4
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    Ebb ???

    What's an EBB?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaskar
    What's an EBB?
    EBB = Eccentric Bottom Bracket.

    Here's a close-up of the Bushnell EBB used on my Seven:


    This allows the bottom bracket to rotate within the larger diameter BB shell. This allows users to adjust the chain tension at the BB instead of the rear horizontal dropouts, which makes using discs much easier, IMHO.
    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  6. #6
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    Dude,

    You're killin' me with that cross bike. Dammit. I need a bigger garage.

  7. #7
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    Not Ti or EBB but a custom Steel Sola...

    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I am looking at Seven now as an option, now they offer an EBB. If you could you please post pictures that would be great. Let me know your experiences. Thanks for your input.
    2,123 miles later and I still love this bike. Seven is a great company to deal with.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    ... and if we just ...

    I have a custom ti seven with EBB, and I love it! Seven was a great company to work with. I have the newer drop outs and they are sweet.. unfortunately I don't have any close up pics for you, sorry.

  9. #9
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    opps

    Sorry meant to start a new thread !
    Last edited by T 3; 06-21-2004 at 08:26 PM. Reason: wrong location
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  10. #10
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    Here are some from this weekends 24 hr solo race...I brought my 'cross back as a back-up, just in case. Fortunately, I didn't need it.









    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  11. #11
    Jed Peters
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1speed_Mike
    Here are some from this weekends 24 hr solo race...I brought my 'cross back as a back-up, just in case. Fortunately, I didn't need it.




    Mike, you should try rotating your brake levers up on the bars, so that the hoods are higher. Pick up a copy of Velonews, it's the way all the bikes nowadays are being set up....more upright and more control on the hoods, especially, i would imagine, for cross.

  12. #12
    Kam
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    yo mike...

    man, love you bikes. i noticed that you bike has marta sl discs. last i remember, you were running the hope mono minis, did you have a problem with 'em?

    cheers!

    Quote Originally Posted by 1speed_Mike
    Here are some from this weekends 24 hr solo race...I brought my 'cross back as a back-up, just in case. Fortunately, I didn't need it.










  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    Mike, you should try rotating your brake levers up on the bars, so that the hoods are higher. Pick up a copy of Velonews, it's the way all the bikes nowadays are being set up....more upright and more control on the hoods, especially, i would imagine, for cross.
    The reason for this trend is sloping frames, short headtubes, and a desired aesthetic (by some) of having bars well below saddle level. Having the bars so low requires the the hoods to be set high on the drops to get any level of comfort. If you start out with your bars at a reasonable height (as Mike does) there is no need to have the hoods tilted up at a crazy angle, and you still have the benefit of actually being able to use your drops and the bars in the manner in which they were intended.

    Sam

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kam
    man, love you bikes. i noticed that you bike has marta sl discs. last i remember, you were running the hope mono minis, did you have a problem with 'em?

    cheers!
    Kam,

    Yes, I recently removed the Hope Mono Minis and installed a set of B4 SL +. I then removed these and installed a set of Marta SLs just 2 weeks ago. The reason for the switch was nothing more than to try something new.

    I hadn't been on Maguras since my older set of HS-33 rimmers, which I absolutely loved. Since I had tried nearly all the other top-end XC disc brakes (Formula B4 SLs, B4 SL+, Hope Mono Mini, Hope Mono, Shimano XTR/XT), but not the Magura Marta SLs, I figured I'd try the Martas to see how they compared against the others. And, after this weekend solo 24 hr race, I'm sold! They were absolutely flawless, quiet, provided excellent modulation and power.

    I liked the Mono Minis, but they just can't compare to the Formula B4 SLs (or SL+) or the Marta. They just don't *feel* as nice. It's hard to quantify, but it's there. It's something you feel when you pull the lever with just that amount of pull and control and you can feel the brakes working. The Formulas and Maguras have it, the Hopes didn't. Don't get me wrong, the Mono Minis were great and provided excellent braking. They did suffer from some howling issues on occassions and also lacked in modulation.

    I'm still going to have to give more time on the Martas because I have less than 2 weeks on them and the weather and trail conditions have been phenomenal. Once things get a little muddier, that's when the truth comes out in terms of reliability, durability, dependability, pad-wear, noise, etc. So far, so good.
    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  15. #15
    Jed Peters
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kolo
    The reason for this trend is sloping frames, short headtubes, and a desired aesthetic (by some) of having bars well below saddle level. Having the bars so low requires the the hoods to be set high on the drops to get any level of comfort. If you start out with your bars at a reasonable height (as Mike does) there is no need to have the hoods tilted up at a crazy angle, and you still have the benefit of actually being able to use your drops and the bars in the manner in which they were intended.

    Sam
    No, that's not the reason at all.

    See: Lance Armstrong. He doesn't have a really low position on the bike, actually, he's only got about 6cm drop.

    The reason for the hoods higher is wrist angle. It's a more natural bend. This produces more power, and better handling. See also: European Peleton.

  16. #16
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    This produces more power,
    Helps your wrists produce more power? Wow. I must admit to sometimes wanting more power from my wrist, but never when I was on the bike... :-)

    Or do you mean angling your wrists helps your legs produce more power? That's magic...

    Don't you just mean "it's a bit comfier"?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    Mike, you should try rotating your brake levers up on the bars, so that the hoods are higher. Pick up a copy of Velonews, it's the way all the bikes nowadays are being set up....more upright and more control on the hoods, especially, i would imagine, for cross.
    The best control position on drop bars is in the drops, especially in the rough. Move the brake levers up on the bars and it is harder to use the brakes. "Ergonomic" bars (dang I hate those things!) make it easier to reach the high mounted levers because you can grip more forward and higher in the drops. I run my levers extra low (even on my road bike) for better brake control and have no issues with comfort or "power" riding on the hoods.

    The pros spend many more hours in the saddle and much of the time on the hoods and tops because it is a higher position that puts less strain on their bodies. Most of them also use more drop (bars below the saddle) than most of us. I estimate LA has about 10cm of drop on his climbing bike and other pros use much more (see cyclingnews.com). The high levers make it easier to brake and shift for the hoods and can be a more comfortable grip while seated. The grip on the high hoods is not as good when standing.
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  18. #18
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    Maybe Brant's right, maybe it's comfier, whatever works for you. But I'd maintain this positioning of hoods is primarily of riders having their bars too low in the first place. If you have the bars high enough so you can actually use the drops (and as Shiggy said this is the best position on drop bars - especially off road) you "shouldn't" need to have the hoods so high on the bars.

    Sorry for sidetracking your thread TiSSer, but Zonic Man has some strange views on bike setup.

    Nice bike Mike - and I love the angle of your hoods :-)

    Sam

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    No, that's not the reason at all.

    See: Lance Armstrong. He doesn't have a really low position on the bike, actually, he's only got about 6cm drop.

    The reason for the hoods higher is wrist angle. It's a more natural bend. This produces more power, and better handling. See also: European Peleton.
    Thanks Zonic. I've tried multiple hood settings: low, med and high. I've found that my current position suits my racing and riding style best. Your results may vary.
    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  20. #20
    Jed Peters
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    Helps your wrists produce more power? Wow. I must admit to sometimes wanting more power from my wrist, but never when I was on the bike... :-)

    Or do you mean angling your wrists helps your legs produce more power? That's magic...

    Don't you just mean "it's a bit comfier"?
    LOL.

    Suzy's doctor claims that body position=more power in that with the wrists in a straight line, the upper body is not as tense, allowing more blood flow and hence, more power to the lower body, freeing up the legs.

    Kinda like if you have a tight, pained look on your face, you are actually EXPENDING energy....even though your face doesn't pedal your bike, you still are affected, performance-wise, by your facial expression while climbing.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    LOL.

    Suzy's doctor claims that body position=more power in that with the wrists in a straight line, the upper body is not as tense, allowing more blood flow and hence, more power to the lower body, freeing up the legs.

    Kinda like if you have a tight, pained look on your face, you are actually EXPENDING energy....even though your face doesn't pedal your bike, you still are affected, performance-wise, by your facial expression while climbing.
    So if I relax my face I will get more blood flow to my wrist and lower body? Do you think standing in front of a full length mirror would help? Oh wait, wrong message board!
    Only boring people get bored.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1speed_Mike

    Did the skewers come with the hub or can you get them seperately?
    Is that a 10mm size allen key hole?
    Last edited by Big Bad Wolf; 06-23-2004 at 09:48 AM.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bad Wolf
    Did the skewers come with the hub or can you get them seperately?
    Is that a 10mm size allen key hole?
    My rear hub on my SS 'cross bike is a Phil Wood flip-flop (fixed-free). It comes with the huge Phil bolt-on nuts. I believe it is a 6mm hole.
    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  24. #24
    nightriding is fun !
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1speed_Mike
    My rear hub on my SS 'cross bike is a Phil Wood flip-flop (fixed-free). It comes with the huge Phil bolt-on nuts. I believe it is a 6mm hole.
    Can they (ie the bolt-on skewers) only be used on SS hubs, or do they fit regular hubs as well?
    Titanium or Bust !

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bad Wolf
    Can they (ie the bolt-on skewers) only be used on SS hubs, or do they fit regular hubs as well?
    The bolt-ons are threaded nuts that thread into the hub's axle. Most SS hubs use a similar bolt-on arrangement to provide adequate and sufficient grip in the horizontal dropouts, but may use a different size thread...no guarantees the Phils will work on any other SS hubs. Some SS hubs (like King) can be converted from bolt-on to quick-release, but I doubt many regular (non SS) hubs could be converted from QR to bolt-on since the diameter of the QR is much smaller than the bolt diameter.
    Ride Hard,
    Mike B. (MCM# 7.77)
    http://www.one-speed.com

  26. #26
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    See also: Peloton.



    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    No, that's not the reason at all.

    See: Lance Armstrong. He doesn't have a really low position on the bike, actually, he's only got about 6cm drop.

    The reason for the hoods higher is wrist angle. It's a more natural bend. This produces more power, and better handling. See also: European Peleton.
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  27. #27
    Jed Peters
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    Quote Originally Posted by donkey
    See also: Peloton.
    Doh!!!!!!!!!!!!

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