anyone ever have luck with using a cassette cog?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FlatFender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    663

    anyone ever have luck with using a cassette cog?

    im going SS for the winter, on my main ride and im trying to keep it as cheap as possible. I knocked apart an old cassette last night, and i want to use the 18t cog form it. Anyone have any luck useing these with a 1/8" chain?i know that its ramped, but i think with a perfect chainline, i should be good to go.

  2. #2
    Sweep the leg!
    Reputation: Caffeine Powered's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,803
    When I was commuting with my old Raleigh touring frame as a SS I ran old 6 & 7 speed sis cogs. I still have a bunch I use on the steel freehub body hubs on the Ferrous. As long as you get the chain tensioned properly it will work fine. The HG cogs are just fine for winter commuter duty. If you get paranoid you could do what I did on the Raleigh. Put a 21t cog on each side of the 18 with spacers in between, it will act like a chainkeeper and even if it did want to slip off it has nowhere to go.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FlatFender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    663
    good idea with the larger cogs on either side

  4. #4
    My Dog eats poo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    124
    I use a 16t from a cassette and its fine.Was going to change to a dedicated ss gear but I seem to get plenty of milage and chains wear befoer the gear needs replacing so I'm happy tokeep using them.

  5. #5
    Live, Freeze, and Ride
    Reputation: lobolator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    315
    Save your knees and crotch and go with Caffiene Powered's plan, trust me.
    Really, trust me, it hurts more than you want to know!
    Inbred 29er Dinglespeed
    Rush Hour SS
    4One5 SS
    Hard Rock SS/Fixie
    In the woodSS
    I work for a bike parts company

  6. #6
    one chain loop
    Reputation: fishcreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,360
    i tried that idea once and regret it. the chain shifted to the larger cog and bent my hub axle. it was impossible to undo it so i have to use my chain tool to free my wheel. buy a non ramped cog.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  7. #7
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,043
    i made maybe 10 miles(mostly paved on a cassette cog before disaster struck, never doing that again. maybe with the larger cogs and chain keepers, but drop the $30(or less) on a good dedicated SS cog.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Sweep the leg!
    Reputation: Caffeine Powered's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,803
    Part of why I ran a pair of 22's on either side of a 16t was because the frame was so noodly I could get it to jump off even with a bolt on axle. Yes the chain line was correct, that's what you get from a 20 year old Technium frame.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  9. #9
    Bike Dork
    Reputation: themanmonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,365
    The problem isn't so much the chain riding up on the ramps of the cog as the cog itself flexing. This is of course assuming that your chainline is correct. Caffeine Powered's idea is a good one, but I'd add a thing or two to it. First I'd use a 12 or 13 tooth cog on each side of the 16 tooth. Use the 12/13 to brace the 16. The one on the inside of the 16 cog you won't have to alter, but the one on the outside you'll have grind or file the wide spacer bit so you can install it backwards. Also if you grind the teeth off the 22 tooth cogs the chain will just slip off the ground down cogs and you won't have the same problem some others in this thread have had with it locking up everything.
    good luck,
    MonkeyB

  10. #10
    blet drive
    Reputation: JUNGLEKID5's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,166
    been runig a ramep rear ring for over 2 years no problems try it
    Save a tree & wipe your butt with an owl.
    Thank your local Sierra Club.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FlatFender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    663
    Took it for a ride today, and it was great!
    thanks folks.

  12. #12
    bike dork
    Reputation: mtbdee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    371
    I ran 15, 16 and 18t Shimano 8 speed cogs (HG70) for a few years on my converted SS frames. Never had any issues with dropping the chain unless I got really cheap and ran an old ramped chainring. The cogs were all in great shape and the chainline was straight. FWIW I weigh ~ 170 so not sure I'm flexing things too much. These days it's either FW or Surly cogs depending on the bike, I wouldn't be afraid of running a cassette cog in good shape though.
    Full disclosure; I sell and repair bikes for a living: http://blackstonebicycles.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    268
    I'm pretty cheap...uh, I mean frugal, when it comes to my winter steed because of the crap they dump on the roads around here. I used cassette cogs for three or four winters without issue. The only time I had problems losing the chain was when the cog and chain were worn to the point of badly needing replacement. This was on a formerly geared frame with a Surly tensioner. That being said, I got a new bike this year and just picked up a different cog to deal with the snow. Local shop had Redline cogs for $5 or $6, so it's not all that much more to do it right (a relative term, I know) and get a bona fide single cog.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: plume's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,659
    Using a single cog should be fine (not ideal, but ok if the chain slips, you just stop for a bit) but wouldn't try it with a cassette. I'm also a jerk who's tried this and has ended up with only a broken chain... could have been much worse. You can get cheap SS cogs too, no need to spend $30.
    My one says BRAP!

  15. #15
    Known Mountainbiker
    Reputation: cazloco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    873
    From what's here, I guess it depends on how you ride. Here in the hills, all that try to us a cassette/cog end up dropping or breaking chains. Not so much from the ramps because a good chain line will take care of that, but more because of the low profile of the teeth and a tensioner that pulls the chain off the cassette/cog leaving a way less than optimal engagement (chain jump). So throw on a cassette cog and if you have problems then you fit into the "doesn't work for me" catagory and then go buy a SS cog. Doesn't cost any thing to try the cassette cog, just don't plan an epic on your first ride.

    Remember, cassette cogs are designed so the chain comes off easily.

    Caz
    I am a Mountain Biker therefore I am late

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    268
    I forgot to second the notion that having the chain skip, fall off, whatever, does suck...particularly when cranking hard.

    Whatever you decide to do, keep your chain properly tensioned and use a cog/chain/ring that are in good condition. Although you can scrounge junk cassettes from your local shop or your own garage, at least some of the cogs in them will be worn.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.