Anyone eliminate the front brake?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Anyone eliminate the front brake?

    I became interested in single speed because I am in awe of my little son doing well in the trails with his BMX bike.

    Now I am thinking about just using a rear brake like his BMX also.

    Has anyone else done this?

  2. #2
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    I rode with a guy recently that ran only a rear disc brake on a 1x9. He said he never really had a problem but i have tried that and on some of the steep stuff i like a front brake so i dont slide the rear down locked out. Depends on the trails i guess.

  3. #3
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    It definitely depends on what you're doing, but I have a hard time relying on 1 single brake. I'm a computer technician, so I come from a background of having to back up important data on multiple locations since we all know hard drives can fail at any time (yes, even brand new ones). I take that mentality on when it comes to bikes.

    I don't want to lose any data on my hard drive because I have pictures of people who are no longer with me.

    [I don't want to rely on one brake because if that one brake fails my face is in a brick wall.]

    But I'm also a hardtail lovin mountain biker, so two brakes makes sense for me.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dd61999
    I became interested in single speed because I am in awe of my little son doing well in the trails with his BMX bike.

    Now I am thinking about just using a rear brake like his BMX also.

    Has anyone else done this?
    Strange. I could see having only a front brake as that is what I use for the majority of my braking. However using only a rear brake would amount to either a pretty slow day on the trails or a broken something or other.

  5. #5
    Jacob 34:19
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    70% of your stopping power comes from the front brake. That's why you see many riders running larger rotors in the front and many motorcycles run dual discs up front. For trials or pump tracks, you'd probably be fine. On your typical MTB trail that includes some hills and tight corners requiring some braking, you'd likely find yourself skidding quite a bit. Skidding is generally not good for the trails and pretty indicative of poor bike handling skills.

  6. #6
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    Front brake is easily the most important. If you scrap that you might as well scrap ya helmet cos it's probably not going to be able to save you at the speed you will be doing when you plow into a tree with only the rear brake.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAKEtheDOG
    70% of your stopping power comes from the front brake. That's why you see many riders running larger rotors in the front and many motorcycles run dual discs up front. For trials or pump tracks, you'd probably be fine. On your typical MTB trail that includes some hills and tight corners requiring some braking, you'd likely find yourself skidding quite a bit. Skidding is generally not good for the trails and pretty indicative of poor bike handling skills.
    X2.......................and heck no! WIthout my front brake most of the trails wouldn't be rideable.

    Quote Originally Posted by chumbox
    Front brake is easily the most important. If you scrap that you might as well scrap ya helmet cos it's probably not going to be able to save you at the speed you will be doing when you plow into a tree with only the rear brake.

    Yep.
    Get off the couch and ride!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    X2.......................and heck no! Without my front brake most of the trails wouldn't be ridable.
    I snapped my rear hydraulic brake hose in the middle of an epic ride and it slowed me to considerably (you can only go as fast as you can reasonably slow yourself down). I've come to the conclusion that you need your front brake to stop and your rear brake to use your front brake. It's similar to a fixie vs singlespeed freewheel; if you try to stop with just a front brake on a singlespeed freewheel, you're constantly risking a high speed front-end wheelie. Add the rear brake or fixed gear and the braking calms down immediately. I don't know the physics behind it, but it is very noticeable.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by chumbox
    Front brake is easily the most important.
    On the small hills that I ride, I have a few spots where I get up to around 30mph, just coasting.

    I hate to imagine the distance (read: the length of the trench I'd create) I'd need to stop there, on rear brake only. I'd also hate to do those spots at grandmother speeds.

    (sorry, I bet there's some grandmothers here. I mean the stereotypical one, not you)

  10. #10
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    I suppose eliminating the front brake on a mountainbike is cheaper than the airfares to the Dignitas clinic in Geneva.

    Meanwhile you make a lot of "friends" from the trail damage you cause by dragging the inefficient back brake.

    Skidding ain't stopping.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    I don't know the physics behind it, but it is very noticeable.
    At a guess, I'd say that this is because when you apply the rear brake, the direction of force felt by the pads wants to rotate the bike down at the front, thereby giving you more load over the front wheel, which is usually translated as more grip, and therefore, increased front braking efficiency.

    but that's just a guess

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob
    At a guess, I'd say that this is because when you apply the rear brake, the direction of force felt by the pads wants to rotate the bike down at the front, thereby giving you more load over the front wheel, which is usually translated as more grip, and therefore, increased front braking efficiency.

    but that's just a guess

    Did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express?
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  13. #13
    I'm just messing with you
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    I'm all about learning by doing. Give it a shot and let us know how it works out for you.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob
    I'm all about learning by doing. Give it a shot and let us know how it works out for you.
    He's going to be relegated to the Riders Down and Recovery forum.
    :wq

  15. #15
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    Front brake for stopping.

    Rear brake for bike control.

    When's the last time you saw a BMX barreling through steep, downhill singletrack? Exactly.

  16. #16
    Papa T
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    I have a buddy who did that. He runs a a 1x9 Spesshy Enduro (04) with only the rear brake. It doesn't seem to hold him back as he has the fastest lap times at our local trail. I let him borrow my front brake for a race once and he almost crashed...wasn't used to that kind of stopping power. Anyway, it seems to me that once you are used to not having a front brake, you can ride and stop just fine without one. I have never seen him create any skids. From what he says, he never brakes anyway, just Balls TO the Wall!

    Personally, I am a clyde and I need all of the braking power I can get...I run with front and rear with a larger disc up front.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Numb Bum
    I have a buddy who did that. He runs a a 1x9 Spesshy Enduro (04) with only the rear brake. It doesn't seem to hold him back as he has the fastest lap times at our local trail. I let him borrow my front brake for a race once and he almost crashed...wasn't used to that kind of stopping power. Anyway, it seems to me that once you are used to not having a front brake, you can ride and stop just fine without one. I have never seen him create any skids. From what he says, he never brakes anyway, just Balls TO the Wall!
    Yeah, but that's just being irresponsible. Perhaps in a race, even going with no brakes could be okay. But when you're on a local trail with others around, running no or just one brake is irresponsible. And no, he does not "stop just fine" without a front brake. Physically impossible to stop just fine dragging the rear wheel for miles downhill. Not to mention the added trail destruction.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    Yeah, but that's just being irresponsible. Perhaps in a race, even going with no brakes could be okay. But when you're on a local trail with others around, running no or just one brake is irresponsible. And no, he does not "stop just fine" without a front brake. Physically impossible to stop just fine dragging the rear wheel for miles downhill. Not to mention the added trail destruction.

    Well, lets not assume that he is dragging his rear wheel the whole way down. It could be possible that he happens to have the skill to weight his rear tire every time he pumps his rear brake which gives him enough stopping power.

  19. #19
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    Skill or not, you can't defy physics. He can pump his weight all he wants, but his mass will still be in front of the rear wheel. When he brakes, the weight transfers to the front, which means crappy braking.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Numb Bum
    Personally, I am a clyde and I need all of the braking power I can get...I run with front and rear with a larger disc up front.
    Not to hijack the thread, but am I alone in thinking that referring to yourself as a Clydesdale is about the gayest thing ever? Nothing personal as I have read it all over and understand it is widely accepted as bicycle terminology, but it's got to stop.

    Oh and if you don't use a front brake, you aren't going very fast on any trail that I would consider fun. There is no argument here. Kind of silly that it has gone on as long as it has.

    We should be talking about more important stuff, like whether heavy dudes should be referring to themselves as large horses or not.

  21. #21
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    What would be the point of ditching the front brake? As if the weight saving isn't going to be offset by crashing every couple hundred yards or riding slow to avoid crashing every couple hundred yards.

    There's nothing to gain. If anything, I'd be adding a front brake to my kids bmx.

    As for the other point made by swaldrop, its a bit off topic. Perhaps swaldrop should post that one in the 'clydes' forum. He might have a point though.

    Its a bit disrespectful to big horses. There's not really any comparison to be drawn between an intelligent, useful work horse and a big guy on a bike.

  22. #22
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    I vote for "Ogres". They do not have feelings.

  23. #23
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    but they have layers! like an onion!
    Just circles turning circles....

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by swaldrop
    am I alone in thinking that referring to yourself as a Clydesdale is about the gayest thing ever?
    Yeah, probably.

    Calling big riders clydes has been around so long as I can remember. If you're going to get upset about that, you really need to ride more.

  25. #25
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    Umm yeah... what everyone else said. I ran one brake on my MTB for a little while... just the front, and it worked okay for the time it needed to. But you just cannot rely on the rear brake alone. It _will not_ stop you on the steep stuff, _will not_ stop you if the conditions are loose, and to whoever said something about riding trials with no front brake, that's just about nonsense. Trials is all about brake control.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    to whoever said something about riding trials with no front brake, that's just about nonsense. Trials is all about brake control.
    Unless you're Chris Akrigg...

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by swaldrop
    Not to hijack the thread, but am I alone in thinking that referring to yourself as a Clydesdale is about the gayest thing ever? Nothing personal as I have read it all over and understand it is widely accepted as bicycle terminology, but it's got to stop.
    Does the term have some meaning in the gay community that we in the bike community are not aware of? Please enlighten us.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  28. #28
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    ^ ^ ^

    yeah... the guy is amazing... I wouldn't call it 'trials' specifically, but definitely has that flavore. He almost has a whole new discipline going on. And has obviously refined the art of bailing to a very high degree. It is good to see someone riding natural stuff like this. Inspiring.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Does the term have some meaning in the gay community that we in the bike community are not aware of? Please enlighten us.
    Probably. You looking for an in?

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by swaldrop
    Probably. You looking for an in?
    No pun intended?

  31. #31
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    Skidding the rear tire on the trail is a NO NO! It damages the trail. Instead of trying to be like your kid why don't you put a front brake on his bike and let him be more like dad?

  32. #32
    MONKEYMAN
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    Can't work the mallet and the right brake lever at the same time. One of 'em had to go!
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  33. #33
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    what if the little guy stops real sudden like on his little wheels, can your big wheels stop as quickly, are your reflexes very very fast?
    wherever you go, there you are

  34. #34
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    i think the OP has long since abandoned this insane thread!

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyt
    i think the OP has long since abandoned this insane thread!


    Still here.

    I think I am going to try it anyway for myself this weekend coming up.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by swaldrop
    Probably. You looking for an in?
    "Probably" means you really don't know, so I suspect your just trolling.
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    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by dd61999
    Still here.

    I think I am going to try it anyway for myself this weekend coming up.
    Sure why not? As long as you ride accordingly you'll be fine. I won't be as effective as two brakes, but it is a lot simpler and the change could be a lot of fun... I occasionally ride my DJ bike on the trails and it is super fun with only a rear brake - a lot like riding a BMX.

    Many seem so opposed to it as it being pointless or dangerous, but I do not see how it is any different than running a fixed gear or a rigid fork in that if you don't chose the correct speed and/or line for your bikes setup you're going to get hurt just as fast.

  38. #38
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    Met a dude at the trails today that was running a single rear brake. That makes 2 guys running only a rear brake and bothe were on a surly instigator frame. One was a 1x9 and the other was SS.

  39. #39
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    Met a dude at the trails today that was running a single rear brake. That makes 2 guys running only a rear brake and bothe were on a surly instigator frame. One was a 1x9 and the other was SS. Neither guy seemed to have a problem and was pushing the pace pretty good.

    On the other hand i just went from 160mm to 180mm front rotor today and it was a world of difference.

  40. #40
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    Worst idea.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by happybrandon
    Sure why not? As long as you ride accordingly you'll be fine. I won't be as effective as two brakes...

    Many seem so opposed to it as it being pointless or dangerous, but I do not see how it is any different than running a fixed gear or a rigid fork in that if you don't chose the correct speed and/or line for your bikes setup you're going to get hurt just as fast.
    Maybe it's ok so long as there are no long downhills or singletrack with corners where there could be someone stopped or coming the other way.

    I have raced with only a back brake after the front hose got ripped off, but that was just until I could pit and replace. I did a long technical downhill like that and there's no way I could have stopped with just the back brake, so if anyone stalled/crashed in front of me, my only option was to accept the injuries I'd have got by spearing off the track into the trees. At least I knew no-one would be walking or riding up the track in the opposite direction.

    It definitely is pointless to do it for "fun" when you are putting other parties at risk instead of just yourself. It's ok if the only person who can get hurt is yourself, that's your choice as an adult.
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  42. #42
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    On a gentle flowing track why not. If things get a little more serious i think it could be bad for you and the trail
    OR you could remove all your brakes go Fixed and load up on health/accident insurance
    don't forget to post the gruesome pictures

  43. #43
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    Cruising the local trails on my SS 29er I rarely need to brake and only use my rear so I see no harm. I even have a very nice beach cruiser that only has a coaster brake on the rear, is that dangerous too? There's too many haters on the web.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by hygieneboy
    Cruising the local trails on my SS 29er I rarely need to brake and only use my rear so I see no harm. I even have a very nice beach cruiser that only has a coaster brake on the rear, is that dangerous too? There's too many haters on the web.
    There's a big difference between riding around on a beach cruiser on its appropriate territory and riding a mountain bike on its territory.

    I think most of the opposition to the single brake is coming from people who are riding on actual mountain bike trails as opposed to gentle pootles along flat tracks. If you only ever have to use your rear brake you are either a downhilling god, or a flatland rider.

    There's no hating going on here, just an attempt to stop an idiot hurting himself or someone else on a mountain bike track. That's called concern.
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  45. #45
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    I don't see it as haters

    obviously there's a great, as in dramatic, difference in what we all call cross country trails, or have available to us.
    wherever you go, there you are

  46. #46
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    People ride in very different conditions.
    I just cannot imagine myself voluntarily riding a bike without a front brake; trail, path or street.

    We did a little ride yesterday and one of the guys said he just recently learned to use the front brake. He thought it was amazing: now he can actually slow down or stop.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by hygieneboy
    Cruising the local trails on my SS 29er I rarely need to brake and only use my rear so I see no harm.
    Most of us don't live in Florida. We have trails that decend 1000's of feet. Often the trails are so steep one can only use brakes to slow down as stopping would be impossible. Under these conditions, the use of a rear brake without the front, would cause fishtailing, loss of control and damage the trail. This is not hatred, we are simply relating experiences that apparently you have not had. You are probably right, in state were the highest point if less than 400 feet above sea level, a front brake is optional. All we are saying is to humor us, and if you venture to any other states, have a front brake ready just in case.

    Below is Soquel Demonstartion Forest on the Left Coast of California. From here it's a mile down to the bottom; front and rear brakes are not an option unless you ride your single brake all the way to the bottom.
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  48. #48
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    haha....I broke a spoke on my commutter once and had to use my wifes rear wheel to get to work and it used rim brakes....... needless to say I crashed....... running on only front brake is scarry at best especially of you need to go down a gravel hill!!
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  49. #49
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    If using a front brake only causes you to slide out or endo, then you need to improve your braking technique. It's a brake lever, not an on/off switch.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by hygieneboy
    Cruising the local trails on my SS 29er I rarely need to brake and only use my rear so I see no harm. I even have a very nice beach cruiser that only has a coaster brake on the rear, is that dangerous too? There's too many haters on the web.


    If you're riding your 29er like a beach cruiser, do you even need brakes period? Just Flintstone it.

  51. #51
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    I guess eveyone that posts on here is a very serious and professional mountain biker. Obviously if you're flying through steep downhills on trails going 30mph or more you'll need two brakes and a lot of skill. For a casual recreational rider going medium speed for fun and exercise with friends on the weekends on easy to moderate trails one brake works just fine.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by hygieneboy
    ...For a casual recreational rider going medium speed .... on easy to moderate trails one brake works just fine.
    Wish you'd made that clear earlier

    Enjoy your ride with your boy and have fun. I'm relieved.
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  53. #53
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    has anyone posted a good reason to remove a front brake yet? Someone earlier described it as pointless. Well it is isnt it? What is the point?

  54. #54
    nothing to see here
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    Quote Originally Posted by wahunterinrok
    Did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express?
    Sorry, you've lost me there. Is it an American thing or something?

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob
    Sorry, you've lost me there. Is it an American thing or something?
    Yes, American pop culture from a commercial series they did for quite a while. Someone comes out of nowhere with something genius only because they stayed at a holiday inn express last night, i.e. businessmen performing open-heart surgery. I like this one

  56. #56
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    Thanks for elaborating for me boomn. I'll take the original remark as a compliment then, just because I can.

  57. #57
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by hygieneboy
    serious and professional mountain biker. Obviously if you're flying through steep downhills on trails going 30mph or more you'll need two brakes

    Not really...
    I might hit 30mph on some of the few straight and almost smooth down hill sections. The rest of the time I average around 6 to 8mph. So what? So, pretty frequently, I need to get my speed down. Trail erosion is not a real problem here, but I still hate to see the skid marks left by people who realise they need to slow down but don't know how to use the front brake.

  58. #58
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    it'd make more sense if you told me you'd do away with the back brake.

    not that much more sense, but at least you'd be able to stop.

  59. #59
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    Note to self:


    Calling brutes on bikes Clydesdales....out.

    New suggestion.........Ogres. (Not bad)

    Personal favorite...Tony the Pony!!!


    Anyway, the dude I talked about above with one brake on the rear....has the skills for our geography to get away with just one brake. We're Floridians and as such don't know no better. The local trail I mentioned has a maximum of about 30'-40' of vertical height. The trail has lots of little downhills and climbs...so keeping your speed up is preferred rather than trying to spin up the climbs....especially when dry as the trail turns to sugar sand in parts due to being 1 mile from the beach.

    The main thing is that people ride and are safe. Go ride!!
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    If using a front brake only causes you to slide out or endo, then you need to improve your braking technique. It's a brake lever, not an on/off switch.
    how bout this: take your front brake only bike and ride as many gravel or wet leaf covered downhills as you can and report back to us about your great intronut theory and how far your feathery touch on the brake lever got you....

    the ability to stop both wheels is absolutely key to being able to ride a bike as quickly as possible

  61. #61
    MONKEYMAN
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyt
    has anyone posted a good reason to remove a front brake yet?
    horses for courses, seriously. I play bike polo 4x per week, grass and hardcourt. because of the nature of the game, tight cornering at speed and the necessity to be going in the opposite direction as quickly as possible- the rear brake is the money brake. In most polo play situations, the front brake is the OTB brake. Being able to lock up the rear to slide 180° in order to get to or block the ball is an essential move. Controlled slide is also a great skill to have while dribbling the ball and avoiding defense.

    Since rules dictate (in grass game anyway) the player must have the mallet in the right hand, most folks either switch the brake cables to go moto style, or just eliminate the front brake altogether and run the rear from the left lever.

    I know about 40 polo players, and out of them, 1 runs a front brake during a game (on the left side) but he is also running a fixed gear. He says he rarely uses the front brake. Most of us with dedicated polo bikes just take the front brake off entirely.

    Is that a good enough reason?
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by finger51
    horses for courses, seriously. I play bike polo 4x per week, grass and hardcourt. because of the nature of the game, tight cornering at speed and the necessity to be going in the opposite direction as quickly as possible- the rear brake is the money brake. In most polo play situations, the front brake is the OTB brake. Being able to lock up the rear to slide 180° in order to get to or block the ball is an essential move. Controlled slide is also a great skill to have while dribbling the ball and avoiding defense.

    Since rules dictate (in grass game anyway) the player must have the mallet in the right hand, most folks either switch the brake cables to go moto style, or just eliminate the front brake altogether and run the rear from the left lever.

    I know about 40 polo players, and out of them, 1 runs a front brake during a game (on the left side) but he is also running a fixed gear. He says he rarely uses the front brake. Most of us with dedicated polo bikes just take the front brake off entirely.

    Is that a good enough reason?
    a good reason perhaps, but the correct context here for a "good reason" would be mountain bikes

  63. #63
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    did away with the rear

    on my rigid ss. only a front v-brake. original intent was for commuting and not so technical trails. that changed quick...now i ride it on everything and have raced it on an insanely difficult trail.

    would i reco it? no.
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by finger51

    Is that a good enough reason?
    good enough for bike polo.

    Still no one has given a good reason to remove a front brake from a bike being used on trails. I just don't see the point? Marginal weight loss?

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyt
    good enough for bike polo.

    Still no one has given a good reason to remove a front brake from a bike being used on trails. I just don't see the point? Marginal weight loss?
    other than aesthetics and the desire to be different, there is no performance reason to remove a brake.
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  66. #66
    MONKEYMAN
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    a good reason perhaps, but the correct context here for a "good reason" would be mountain bikes
    uhuh. Well that MB-1 was a mountain bike before you were likely out of grade school (or possibly even diapers) there sonny.
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by finger51
    horses for courses, seriously. I play bike polo 4x per week
    ...Most of us with dedicated polo bikes just take the front brake off entirely.

    Is that a good enough reason?
    When you start playing polo on a 1,500ft winding rocky descent with a void on one side.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  68. #68
    MONKEYMAN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike
    When you start playing polo on a 1,500ft winding rocky descent with a void on one side.
    that would be cool. I can just imagine the joust! MARCO -O -O -O!!!
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by finger51
    uhuh. Well that MB-1 was a mountain bike before you were likely out of grade school (or possibly even diapers) there sonny.
    OK, fair enough, but what has it done recently? Its still not within the context of mountain biking is it there pops?

    (btw, still crawling in diapers when your bike first came out. My first real mountain bike was an entry-level Nishiki Bravo when I was in middle school)

  70. #70
    MONKEYMAN
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    OK, fair enough, but what has it done recently?
    well besides kicking much ass in polo, I did soilsaloon on it last week. Sure it's not much of a race, but a race where you need to do a tequila shot before you can finish is a fine race in my book!
    I'm the one on the left:
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  71. #71
    Dawgwalker
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    Another reason for a front only is that is sometimes the only way to run a disc brake.
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  72. #72
    local trails rider
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    If you have a disc front, you can still have a V in ther rear.

  73. #73
    Nervous Descender
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    What is the point in removing the front brake? Or having only one? Unless you're on a fixed gear, of course.
    Check out some of our local hills: CDRC (Capital District Road Climbs)

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adirondack Blues
    What is the point in removing the front brake? Or having only one? Unless you're on a fixed gear, of course.
    Nostalgia and simplicity!!!!!!!!!

    I am surprised of the amount of slack I got from this thread I started. I thought more people would be able to relate in this forum. I guessed wrong.

    One of the reason I love single speed because it brings me back to my youth when I loved BMX racing. Watching my 8 year old son perform better with a light bmx racing bike as opposed to a heavy youth sized mountain bike on the mountain bike trails has inspired me to try single speed. I love the simplicity as well. So I thought I try eliminating the front brake like a bmx racing bike as well. Do I stop as well as two brakes? No way near it!!!!!!...... But the feeling brings me back to the BMX racing days and it is more about what is fun then what is technically better.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by dd61999
    Nostalgia and simplicity!!!!!!!!!

    I am surprised of the amount of slack I got from this thread I started. I thought more people would be able to relate in this forum. I guessed wrong.

    One of the reason I love single speed because it brings me back to my youth when I loved BMX racing. Watching my 8 year old son perform better with a light bmx racing bike as opposed to a heavy youth sized mountain bike on the mountain bike trails has inspired me to try single speed. I love the simplicity as well. So I thought I try eliminating the front brake like a bmx racing bike as well. Do I stop as well as two brakes? No way near it!!!!!!...... But the feeling brings me back to the BMX racing days and it is more about what is fun then what is technically better.
    So you'd sacrifice safety (yours and others on the trail) and better control, for what? "Nostalgia and simplicity?"

    And not taking anything away from your son, but I can't remember the last time I took riding tips from an 8 year old.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by dd61999
    ...I am surprised of the amount of slack I got from this thread I started. I thought more people would be able to relate in this forum. I guessed wrong...
    No-one wants to see you injure yourself.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

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