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  1. #1
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    Any problems with the ENO hub?

    Looking at converting a geared frame to SS, and would like to avoid using a tensioner. Also, don't want to be limited in my gearing choice (ie. magic gear).

    From my research, it sounds like White Industries has all the bases covered with their ENO disc hub, disc brake adaptor and trials freewheel. (Gotta have that quick engagement!)

    Are there any downfalls (besides price) to using this system? Most reviews say it's very reliable, spins smooth and excellent when it comes to keeping "crap" out of the bearings. (Low maintenance is a priority.)

    Any nuances that users care to share?

    Thanks.

    Steve

    BTW: I'm ~200lb and ride aggressive XC and trail. Are the hubs pretty bombproof?

  2. #2
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    just make sure the frame works with the disc brake adapter. on mine the seat stays interfered with some of the adjustment range so i was forced to be use it in the 12 o clock position which dropped my BB height a tad. i also had to grind down the end of one of my caliper attachment bolts cause it bottomed out on the cams. basically setup is the only issue. once set i have had ZERO problems. also when removing the rear wheel you have to readjust tension when reibstalling.

    though if i were to do it over i'd go with one of the eccentric BB adapters. though i actually went with paragon sliders and custom!

  3. #3
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    I have the standard Eno disc hub with Trials FW. I can tell you that the hub and FW are awesome. In my case however, my frame has horizontal dropouts (track ends). I think that if I was going to go this route with a standard frame I would seriously consider just running the Forward Components EBB over the eccentric rear hub. This would pretty much allow you to set it and forget it for the most part. I have also heard of the WI eccentric hubs slipping on Ti frames.

    The beauty of the EBB in this case, is that more than likely you already have a set of wheels. You could simply spend $150 for the ebb and be done! You could then upgrade your wheels later on to a nicer hub set up if that is still your desire.

  4. #4
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    When I originally got mine it seemed to slip quite often. It's been a couple of years since I've used it so I'm not sure if it was user error or something else entirely. It was being used on my Waltworks frame with Breezer vertical dropouts.

    jason

  5. #5
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    Mine worked ok, but I did experience a little slippage. You'll need to buy a special tool to remove the freewheel.
    http://www.aspirevelotech.com/Mercha...t_Code=FWTOOLE
    "I like skinny jeans. Sometimes I wear them to the mall to get an Orange Julius." -Chim Chim

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jason74
    When I originally got mine it seemed to slip quite often. It's been a couple of years since I've used it so I'm not sure if it was user error or something else entirely. It was being used on my Waltworks frame with Breezer vertical dropouts.

    jason
    I experienced a similar situation. About 6 years ago and after I ran a tensioner for several months, I had a non-disc ENO hub wheel built up for my GT Zaskar. Quality is first rate and while I like the concept over a tensioner, it does have a couple downsides for me. The eccentric has plenty of adjustability for chain tensioning, which sounds great, but........where your axle ends up when the chain is correctly tensioned can have a very noticeable effect on your frame geometry. For example, my wheel ended up sitting high enough in the frame, that I had to adjust the brake pads on my Avid SD-7 Vs from their normal setting in the middle of the brake arm, to as high as they would possibly go. And this just barely worked. By adding a link to my chain, it took it to the extreme opposite situation. Sure, I could have experimented with half-links or different chainring/cog setups to minimize this, but that was more money and hassle than I wanted to deal with. After all, what's the primary point of SS'ing? And on top of all this, the hub slipped enough, that I typically had to re-adjust chain tension about every other ride. I even bought a special long hex wrench to tighten that hub. I am seriously amazed that I never broke anything in my quest to stop the slipping. I still have that wheel, mainly because I know that I can buy the parts from WI to change the hub to a standard axle. It is a very well built hub and the gentleman that built the wheel for me did a first-rate job, it just did not work for me. However, I have heard of more than a few people that love theirs.

  7. #7
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    how severe was the slippage, and couldn't that be eliminated with a Carbon assembly pastE (in the case of a CARBON FRAME) loctight, etc?

  8. #8
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    The stock bearings were not up to my conditions. I got about three months out of them before I had to replace, seems a little fast to me.
    Well, it was a good try.

  9. #9
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    Been running the eno hub for about 8 years now. Same hub, one set of bearings. I also had slipping at first but a little sanding of the drop outs (insides) made that problem go away. I used the hub for a long time in the eccentric mode. I now have converted it with a straight axle and use it on my full squish SS set up. So many miles (thousands) on one hub, amazing. The free wheels last forever. I just use the regular ones (not trials, no need). I have the disc hub but never used it until I switched it over to straight axle (9mm) so I can not comment on the disc adapter for the eccentric set up.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by buggymancan
    how severe was the slippage, and couldn't that be eliminated with a Carbon assembly pastE (in the case of a CARBON FRAME) loctight, etc?
    I really don't think this would help. Paste and locktite are designed for threaded components and circular clamping areas (like stems around handlebars). The way the eno clamps to a frame a different issue. It needs to bite into the actual frame material to keep it from shifting.

    The Eccentric axle end has kind of a raised lip around the edge that's a couple millimeters wide. This has to press into the frame hard enough to stop the rotation of the axle. I can't see carbon paste or loctite really helping in this situation.

    Success seems to vary to some degree based on the material the dropouts are made of. I used one on an old Pinarello frame with hardend, chromed dropouts, and the ENO just couldn't grab the material hard enough. It slipped constantly. Apparently people have had similar experiences with ti bikes. However, on softer steel dropouts, some folks seem to have great success with it.

    This new design being prototyped by People's Bikes might grip better:

    http://prollyisnotprobably.com/2011/...ic_hub_pro.php

  11. #11
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    You have to remove the axle to use a regular freewheel remover, if you don't want to spring for the ENO one. Not a big deal just something to be aware of.

  12. #12
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    It all depends....................

    If you have a LARGEr surface contact between the eno hub and frame, it works GREAT.

    If the contact area on the bike is not a flat surface you get little contact and you'll get slippage.

  13. #13
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    I use one on a 2007 Rocky Mountain Fusion. I don't even need to use the ENO brake adapter. It just worked out that way though. Before The fusion I used it on a salsa a la carte. Its generally a very good set-up. Its never given me any problems.

  14. #14
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    Another vote for the FC EBB. I used Enos for a while, and still use one on one of my bikes, but the FC EBB is just better.

  15. #15
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    For the amount of cash you're going to spend on the ENO or FC, you may want to consider buying a proper SS frame with track ends, EBB or sliders. Something like an On One Inbred is a good, cheap option.

  16. #16
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    I have been running an Eno hub for a few years now, I first had it on my Ti frame and now have it on my Steel frame.
    I have no issues with slipping on either frame and didn't do anything to either the frame or the hub to prevent it from slipping.
    As far as bearing maint. I did replace them last season (which was very easy to do) with some ceramic hybrid bearings for about $20 for the two bearings. I have seen the ECC's for regular BB's and would probably try one of those since it would leave me with multiple hub options.

    Derrick

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Mickstar
    Looking at converting a geared frame to SS, and would like to avoid using a tensioner. Also, don't want to be limited in my gearing choice (ie. magic gear).

    From my research, it sounds like White Industries has all the bases covered with their ENO disc hub, disc brake adaptor and trials freewheel. (Gotta have that quick engagement!)

    Are there any downfalls (besides price) to using this system? Most reviews say it's very reliable, spins smooth and excellent when it comes to keeping "crap" out of the bearings. (Low maintenance is a priority.)

    Any nuances that users care to share?

    Thanks.

    Steve

    BTW: I'm ~200lb and ride aggressive XC and trail. Are the hubs pretty bombproof?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    For the amount of cash you're going to spend on the ENO or FC, you may want to consider buying a proper SS frame with track ends, EBB or sliders. Something like an On One Inbred is a good, cheap option.
    I think the FC EBB and Eno is the equal of any dedicated single speed's tensioning system.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    I think the FC EBB and Eno is the equal of any dedicated single speed's tensioning system.
    As I've already said in another thread, FC may work for some. Me, personally, do not want the inconveniences of that system. Track ends have been fail-proof for me. Salsa's swinger system seems to be ok thus far (only one short trail ride and 20-30 mile road ride so far). Even if I were looking at EBB, I would rather have the full tensioning range of a proper EBB system.

  19. #19
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    I found the ENO to work great when I was riding it! It was installed on a new frame, and it would slip a bit the first few rides. But after the paint got scuffed in the inside of the drop outs the slipping ended. I found the need to readjust brakes due to a gear combo change cumbersome, and after 2 years I called it quits. The entire time i had the wheel there were no problems, and the resale value is pretty good. Great way to get into SS riding on quality equipment. When its on the bike and rolling it's solid.

  20. #20
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    Brake shudder from the ENO Eccentric?

    I've been running the ENO eccentric hub on my aluminum frame for a handful of rides and getting enough slippage that it needs to be tightened after about an hour. I'm 220 and put a lot of mash into the short, steep, root-covered hills I ride, so I'm not entirely surprised, though I'm hoping that with a little sanding of the drops, as an earlier poster mentioned, I can improve the performance.

    While I'm working on that, has anyone experienced brake shudder or squealing in the rear brake caused by the ENO? I have the brake pads pretty well aligned with the rotor, and I'm getting an ugly sound from them with any hard braking. I changed the pads, but the problem remains. If it's not being caused by the slippage of the hub (and I am not really sure it is) I'll have to investigate other causes.

    Thanks

  21. #21
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    How tightly are you making the Eno's axle nuts?

  22. #22
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    As tight as I can, short of "crap, I just ruined another bolt!"

  23. #23
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    some tips...

    Make your wheel stays centered. When you tighten one side, and move to the other - it can walk away from you.

    How are you positioning the freehub? I've had the best luck with it down and to the rear. That way it can only slip so far before the chain won't let it go any farther.

    A Torque wrench is your friend. They recommend 20 ft/lb in the manual, but I had to go to 25 to keep it from slipping.... and I'm a long way from 220lb.

  24. #24
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    Are you using anti seize or grease on the bolt threads?

  25. #25
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    Thanks for the help -- on my last ride there wasn't any slippage -- either the pieces finally broke in, or the extra twist that I gave the bolts after flipping the bike back onto the wheels made a difference.

    Also, I was able to isolate the brake shudder to the rotor and have a new one on order now.

    One note -- I found rotating the axle to a position below the bolt actually induced more slippage, and my guess for the cause is that it was putting it in a position that resulted in less of the dropout contacting the face of the ENO axle and hence less grip.

    I wouldn't mind the option of dropping the axle rather than raising it because that would give me the option to slightly steepen my headtube angle rather than slacken it, which would be an attractive option for certain terrain.

    Thanks again for the help

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