Adjustable cassette spacer - Gear Clamp- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Adjustable cassette spacer - Gear Clamp

    Interesting adjustable cassette spacer a saw at bike rumor:
    https://www.bikerumor.com/2011/01/07...ed/#more-26555

    Looks simple to take on and off, and adjustable chainline. Tho I rarely take my cog off, some might do it more frequently, and chainline adjustment looks a snap.

    Nice solution.



    https://www.gearclamp.com/

    P

  2. #2
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    There has been a few threads on these things. I do not like how it doesnt securely hold the cog It's really just going to be able to float in there, which can do damage to aluminum freehub bodies after time. I bet it'll also make some noise as well.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    There has been a few threads on these things. I do not like how it doesnt securely hold the cog It's really just going to be able to float in there, which can do damage to aluminum freehub bodies after time. I bet it'll also make some noise as well.

    Sorry, I didn't see the other threads. disregard.

    P

  4. #4
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    You could use the inboard clamp and then use spacers and lockring on the outboard side, that would allow you to get correct chain line and clamp the gear.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lastwords
    You could use the inboard clamp and then use spacers and lockring on the outboard side, that would allow you to get correct chain line and clamp the gear.
    At that point you've lost the advantage of the gear clamp and might as well run spacers inboard.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lastwords
    You could use the inboard clamp and then use spacers and lockring on the outboard side, that would allow you to get correct chain line and clamp the gear.
    That's unlikely to stay put.

  7. #7
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    seems to have no real advantage over spacers, which are light, cheap, thickness down to 1mm or less for fine tuning, and can't be dislodged.

  8. #8
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    I ride SS because there is almost nothing that can break and ruin my ride. These would be a step backwards. I can't imagine that a lockring and spacers would weigh any more and they would be way more reliable. Also, a lockring and spacers actually apply pressure on the cog and help to stiffen it. These would supply no side load and actually allow the cog to move back slightly when coasting and then slam into the teeth on the freewheel further causing wear By not using a lockring, you make it way easier for dirt to get inside the freewheel.

    If weight is an issue for $25 on ebay you can get a set of carbon spacers and aluminum lock ring that are certainly lighter than this and have all the advantages of the standard system.

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    I can't imagine ever using those clamps, and yes they are a solution looking for a problem, but I love the ingenuity that went into making them. Anyone that takes the time to think something like that out and then construct it, will no doubt eventually come up with something needed and of value.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  11. #11
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    I've used them.

    I used them this summer and didn't have any problems. I'm 195 and ran it with 180mm cranks. I never had to mess with them or adjust them once in place. Easy and simple.
    Banks

  12. #12
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    Assuming it doesn't slip, doesn't make noise, doesn't make out with your sister, whatever, works perfectly fine, I still think it's a solution searching for a problem. Really, what's the big deal with using spacers and a lockring? Do you really change your cranks (and therefore chainline) or gearing so much that you can't just use a chainwhip and cassette lockring tool?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by FKMTB07
    I still think it's a solution searching for a problem.
    On a full sized cassette, perhaps you could use 2 or 3 cogs on the cassette with these and you could change cogs without removing the wheel.

    May or may not work, but some products create unintended solutions that are better than the intended solution.

    P

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P
    On a full sized cassette, perhaps you could use 2 or 3 cogs on the cassette with these and you could change cogs without removing the wheel.

    May or may not work, but some products create unintended solutions that are better than the intended solution.

    P
    Someone should invent some sort of device that allows you to swap between the cogs without even getting off the bike. I agree that this is a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanD
    Someone should invent some sort of device that allows you to swap between the cogs without even getting off the bike.....

    possibly with a handlebar mounted adjuster clickety thingie
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll

    possibly with a handlebar mounted adjuster clickety thingie
    That would just be solving a problem that doesn't exist.

    Besides, I would prefer on the down tube.

    P

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P
    That would just be solving a problem that doesn't exist.

    Besides, I would prefer on the down tube.

    P
    Maybe there could be a thing in the back that moves back and forth. It could sort of derail the chain so to speak, but keep it inline with the other cog you wanted to switch to.


    I don't think the downtube will work. Who would want to take their hands off the bars?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike
    ...

    I don't think the downtube will work. Who would want to take their hands off the bars?
    I could see that working on a old steel road bike with ram horns - possibly when you weren't able to fit them in with your brake levers
    Honestly... ahh I give up

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