9 spd Cassettes that come apart easy?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    9 spd Cassettes that come apart easy?

    I'm sure this has already been answered in the forums but I don't remember where.

    I'm just about place an order for a hope pro 2 SS hub that can fit up to six 9-speed sprockets. Most who make this conversion would grab a SRAM cassette where the smallest three cogs just come right off. But I would like to find a cassette that come completely apart so I can pick out the 5 or 6 sprockets I need.

    So which cassettes can come apart relatively easy or with a dremel? As I'm experimenting for the winter I'd like to go with cheaper options, maybe SRAM 951 or Shimano Deore LX, but I'm not sure which 9speed will come apart, with spacers, easy?

    And would I have to buy spacers separately if I take a cassette apart?

    SB links to a page where you order custom size sprockets but many are out of stock. He also notes that the smallest cog you use generally must have the spacer built in, and I assume this would be true for the the 12, 13, 14 sizes. http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/k7.html#9

  2. #2
    Feeling retro..but Jung
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    only the 2 smallist have the spacer built in on both my XT and DA..the next 2 are loose on both then on the DA it's 2 on a carrier then 3 on a carrier..I cannot remember on the XT as I sold the bike it was on and well went SS

  3. #3
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    970 and 950 both are made entirely of seperate cogs and I believe the larger cogs are held together by some bolts from the back side

    LX and below from Shimano do not have the one piece aluminum carrier on the larger cogs, but I don't believe they are as easily separated as the SRAM cogs

  4. #4
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    I seperated a deore cassete. It's very easy. remove the heads of the three connecting pins with a dremel (from the backside of the cassete) and tap the pins out with a small pointy object.

  5. #5
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    FWIW I have never seen a cassette that had rivets holding the cogs together.

    It is usually a VERY small allen or regular wrench.

    That is to say a cassette with all separate cogs, if they have an aluminum carrier they will be riveted to that.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesMAmyke
    FWIW I have never seen a cassette that had rivets holding the cogs together.

    It is usually a VERY small allen or regular wrench.

    That is to say a cassette with all separate cogs, if they have an aluminum carrier they will be riveted to that.
    not Deore or lower, they are pinned. I go through a lot of them on my geared bike because of climbing with a heavy guy on a heavy bike I put it under a lot of stress. the pins start to loosen after about three months of riding, and time to replace. I'm not putting a high end cassette on a freeride bike to get destroyed.

  7. #7
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    All the info you may need is here


    http://www.pvdwiki.com/index.php?title=Six_Speed_MTB

  8. #8
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    Indeed. The lower end cassettes are pinned.

    All the new higher end cassettes use separate cogs for the smaller sizes and clusters on carriers for the higher sizes. (this is just the shimano offroad cassettes, i dunno about the road cassetes.

    I used the carrier of an M770 cassette with the next separate cog on my Hope hub. That was a 6 speed setup.

    A buddy of mine is gonna machine the back end of this carrier. that way it should be possible to get 7 cogs on it.

  9. #9
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    Reputation: scyule's Avatar
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    the GREAT thing about using this method to source a good variety of cogs to experiment with is that the CHEAPER the cassette, the BETTER.... find a SRAM 950 as BOOMN mentioned or even a super cheap sunrace cassette and use an angle gringder or dyegrinder to take the end off the pins holding it together...... the more expensive (lighter) cassettes use a spider and only one or two small cogs are made to slide onto a freehub

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