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Thread: 36x22 ???

  1. #1
    120
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    36x22 ???

    I'm wondering if I'm overlooking anything here: This ratio looks perfect for my ability / area. I figure less ground clearance, longer wear life, more chain - heavier (though I figure not by much). Are there other things I'm not considering? These sound huge compared to the norm - at least around here.

  2. #2
    CB2
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    Nothing wrong with running a bigger ring and cog. "They" say that it will run smoother. I believe Endless advocates such.

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    I'm running 36x22 right now and I like it. It does seem to feel a bit smoother, but it is really just shades of the same color (nothing revolutionary)

  4. #4
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    bigger is better

    I think the difference of a larger chainring is noticable, for the better.

    I don't have a lot of downed logs to negotiate and the hill I ride are not that steep, or that long, so I can get by with a large chainring and I feel a lot faster and smoother with it.
    Sometimes, with a very strenuous effort, I will fatigue.

  5. #5
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    how steep are the trails that you need such a high ratio?
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

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    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    how steep are the trails that you need such a high ratio?
    36x22 is the same ratio as 32x20 (see here), which is a very common ratio for 29ers. Also 29er gearing is different than 26ers, so this is equivalent to 32x18 on your 26" bike

  7. #7
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    Running the bigger gears should help improve wear and tear on the drivetrain. More gear teeth in contact with the chain = spreads out the load = parts last longer
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  8. #8
    @adelorenzo
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    I've always tried to stick to bigger cogs, mainly to have more engagement. Slower wear is also nice. I'm currently running 34x19, that is about the smallest I would go in the back. If I want a taller gear I'd grab a bigger front ring.

  9. #9
    Out spokin'
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    Not a thing wrong with 36x22. Heck, I'm running 36x24.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  10. #10
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    Yes - a 36 x 22 would be just a hair taller than a 32 x 20, and just a bit smaller than a 33 x 20. The larger ring/cog will wear about 10% longer, the only downside is that it weighs a bit more if you are a weenie. If it works for your trails and you can climb what you need to, and go fast enough on the flats, do it!
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  11. #11
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    Thanks all, I have the 22t on its way. Appreciate the info!

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