24t cog, who makes them?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 88 of 88
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943

    24t cog, who makes them?

    I use a 24t cog for my preferred SS gearing. I have been very happily using a Boone cog, and it has been great. But I am starting to fear the day it wears out, as I cannot get another one. Yes I have tried all the available channels. So I was doing a search and came up with 2 companies making 24t SS cogs, Endless and Rennen. Both are made from 7075-T6 aluminum. I REALLY don't like the idea of aluminum for a SS cog, and would rather have steel or titanium. I tried a 22t Endless for a couple of rides a few years ago, and the teeth showed significant mushrooming. I am not a huge clyde (185lbs), and I don't think I have superhuman leg stregth, so I am not sure what to make of this. I have seen plenty of reviews from people happily using Endless cogs, even in smaller sizes. Did I just get a bad cog? That experience just has me scared about trying another aluminum cog.

    Anyway, does anyone have any recommendations for me?

    Thanks,
    mark

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,656
    What size is your chain ring? You could go with a smaller cog in the rear and a larger gear in the front.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,981
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    I use a 24t cog for my preferred SS gearing. I have been very happily using a Boone cog, and it has been great. But I am starting to fear the day it wears out, as I cannot get another one. Yes I have tried all the available channels. So I was doing a search and came up with 2 companies making 24t SS cogs, Endless and Rennen. Both are made from 7075-T6 aluminum. I REALLY don't like the idea of aluminum for a SS cog, and would rather have steel or titanium. I tried a 22t Endless for a couple of rides a few years ago, and the teeth showed significant mushrooming. I am not a huge clyde (185lbs), and I don't think I have superhuman leg stregth, so I am not sure what to make of this. I have seen plenty of reviews from people happily using Endless cogs, even in smaller sizes. Did I just get a bad cog? That experience just has me scared about trying another aluminum cog.

    Anyway, does anyone have any recommendations for me?

    Thanks,
    mark
    Did you run the new cog with an old chain? If so, how old was the chain?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    792
    Quote Originally Posted by Vtolds
    What size is your chain ring? You could go with a smaller cog in the rear and a larger gear in the front.
    I believe you mean smaller rear cog and smaller chainring...

    For example, 22:16 gives you nearly the same ratio as 32:24... and both are common chainring/cog sizes.
    Stache 7 --- Rigid Surly 1x1 B+ --- Dirt Drop CrossCheck

  5. #5
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by Vtolds
    What size is your chain ring? You could go with a smaller cog in the rear and a larger gear in the front.
    Do you mean smaller in the rear and the front?

    But I'm curious to know what you're running in the front, as well. I'm currently at 33x20 and couldn't imagine running 24 or even 22. I live in the rockies with plenty of hills, too. Plus, I'm not that strong of a rider, so not saying I'm some macho guy or something.

    EDIT: Echo is strong in here today.
    Last edited by p nut; 06-25-2009 at 10:01 AM.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,656
    I ride 32x18, thats why I am also curious to see what the front gearing is.

  7. #7
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Sorry, that question was meant for the OP. Oh, forgot to mention I'm on a 29er.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    540
    I have not used these, but they are available as big as 25T! (alu though) -- https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...28&category=40

    It wouldn't be unthinkable to go with a 32x24 or a 34x24 for a purpose built technical bike. I'm running one of my bikes 32x22 on 26" for just that reason.

    Going nowhere fast, but I sure do love playing in the rocks.

    If that's really the intention here (just guessing) it would make sense to consider a change up front. Go to a different crank where you could use a 26T chainring, for instance, and run an 18T or 20T out back. No trouble finding those in steel.

    edit: or you could go with -- https://sales.light-bikes.com/extral...ctaRamp30T.jpg

    edit: heh.. and yeah... echo.
    Last edited by sunset1123; 06-25-2009 at 10:31 AM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    792
    You could try searching for more 'Trials' oriented parts... those guys run crazy low gearing SS. Or perhaps asking in a trials forum, if changing your chainring is undesirable for whatever reason.
    Stache 7 --- Rigid Surly 1x1 B+ --- Dirt Drop CrossCheck

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Thanks for all of the replies everyone. I am currently running 34:24 as my normal gearing. I do have a 22t that I use on flatter trails. Oh yeah, and I am on a 29er with the fattest tires I can find! My normal rides have lots of steep climbs and not much in the way of flats, so I don't have to worry about spinning out. There are still some extended technical climbs that I can't make it all the way up yet. I am in NY, and most of my local trails, the ones I like to ride, are all very slow, very technical tight singletrack with lots of steep ups and downs, therefore the low gearing.

    So that is why I use the low gearing I do. The next problem is, I really like how smooth my drivetrain is, and would rather not go to smaller rings and cogs. I also love my Boone 34t chainring! So it looks like the Endless and Rennen are the only choices, unless Boone decides to fire the machines up again!

    Here are some ratios close to what I am using:
    Current:
    34:24=1.417
    Others:
    32:22=1.455
    30:21=1.428
    33:23=1.435

    Looks like King will be making cogs up to 23t soon, but then i need to find a nice new 33t ring.

    Mark

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,981
    I don't think ActionTec makes a 24t, but I'm pretty sure they are still actively making cogs at least. Maybe they could be convinced to offer larger sizes?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    962

    Endless KA cogs work for me

    [QUOTE=bikeny]I use a 24t cog for my preferred SS gearing. I have been very happily using a Boone cog, and it has been great. But I am starting to fear the day it wears out, as I cannot get another one. Yes I have tried all the available channels. So I was doing a search and came up with 2 companies making 24t SS cogs, Endless and Rennen. Both are made from 7075-T6 aluminum. I REALLY don't like the idea of aluminum for a SS cog, and would rather have steel or titanium. I tried a 22t Endless for a couple of rides a few years ago, and the teeth showed significant mushrooming. I am not a huge clyde (185lbs), and I don't think I have superhuman leg stregth, so I am not sure what to make of this. I have seen plenty of reviews from people happily using Endless cogs, even in smaller sizes. Did I just get a bad cog? That experience just has me scared about trying another aluminum cog.

    Anyway, does anyone have any recommendations for me?

    I have been running Endless Kick A$$ cogs on a few of my bikes for the last 3 years,,,,,,,,,,,,they have held up fine, but the largest cog has been a 21. I would guess a few of my 20's have at least 2000 miles on them and are still in fine condition

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    I have not used these, but they are available as big as 25T! (alu though) -- https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...28&category=40
    That is the cog I mentioned in my original post, and they don't have any in stock anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    And no, I don't want a smaller chainring, especially that one! Then I would just have to replace the ring and cogs more often!

  14. #14
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Going down to 32 would give you better clearance and better component selection for both the chainring and cog (also, maybe cheaper?). I'm using Surly steel rings both front and back and it feels very smooth to me.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    5
    Have you looked at Singlestar cogs? Hugely expensive, but so, so sweet.

    www.singlestar.de

    singlestar_titan_24z.jpg

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    540
    ^ ^ ^ drool.

    $194 USD. wow.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,714
    I've seen a cog that mounts a granny gear chain ring to it, so the cog essentially is just a splined hub with a 4 bolt hole pattern. You could use any 24T granny gear that you want with that. I can't remember where i saw it or what it was, but it would do what you want.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Strike the primer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    I've seen a cog that mounts a granny gear chain ring to it, so the cog essentially is just a splined hub with a 4 bolt hole pattern. You could use any 24T granny gear that you want with that. I can't remember where i saw it or what it was, but it would do what you want.


    SPICER Cycles had those.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    I REALLY don't like the idea of aluminum for a SS cog, and would rather have steel or titanium. I tried a 22t Endless for a couple of rides a few years ago, and the teeth showed significant mushrooming. I am not a huge clyde (185lbs), and I don't think I have superhuman leg stregth, so I am not sure what to make of this. I have seen plenty of reviews from people happily using Endless cogs, even in smaller sizes. Did I just get a bad cog? That experience just has me scared about trying another aluminum cog.
    Well, I'm no great SS rider, but I play one on TV (and I slept at a Holiday Inn).

    I've used an Endless 24T KA Cog with a 36T chainring for my gearing. I used it for a long time too. I never noticed any problems with wear. I won't say you got a bad one, because I only ever used one, but I think it might be worth another try. It's not like they cost $192.

    I have not been riding that bike for a while, and I've been using 36x22 on a 650B rear wheel. I bet 24T would be nicer on my legs again...

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Holy Crap! $194 for a cog! I think I will pass. Thanks again for all of the replies. I decided that I really like my current gearing and do not want to play with other ratios. so I placed an order for a Rennen 24t cog. I will also keep emailing Boone in hopes that he gets sick of me and just makes a few more for me!

    Mark

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14
    I ordered a cog from www.singleandfixed.com That's what I thought was Boone cogs on the 12th of June it's now the 27th and have no cog I didn't know about the crazy mess that was Boone cogs. I new I should have just stuck with the tried and true king cogs but I was going all fancy and it turned out to be a gigantic fail!

    Thank MTBR for helping me find my mistakes I love you all

  22. #22
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Word on the streets is Boone is busy making wedding rings and the such. If you look on his site, it says he isnt taking any orders for cogs.


    However, i can make custom cogs if you cant find what you need.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14
    Really lets see some of your stuff.
    I already ordered a bunch of King Cogs as I know they work.

    Lets see it. you have a web site?

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cygnus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    481
    i swapped out my 22t surly cog for a 24t endlesscycles cog.

    7075 aluminum. $30. works fine for me.

    got it at webcyclery

    http://www.webcyclery.com/product.ph...cat=402&page=1

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by BEEZLEBOSS
    I ordered a cog from www.singleandfixed.com That's what I thought was Boone cogs on the 12th of June it's now the 27th and have no cog I didn't know about the crazy mess that was Boone cogs. I new I should have just stuck with the tried and true king cogs but I was going all fancy and it turned out to be a gigantic fail!

    Thank MTBR for helping me find my mistakes I love you all
    I have actually had very good experiences with Singleandfixed. I have placed a couple of orders with him in the past, and they were delivered quickly. Unfortunately, he only has up to 22t cogs, and even the normal sized may be hard to come by now.

    Mark

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    Word on the streets is Boone is busy making wedding rings and the such. If you look on his site, it says he isnt taking any orders for cogs.


    However, i can make custom cogs if you cant find what you need.
    Yeah, let's see what you can make. I would certainly give one a try. What material are you using? Thickness? Wide base? Post up a picture if you have one.

    Mark

  27. #27
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    I've made one out of titanium, which is currently on my bike. The first one was very basic (because i needed it quickly for a ride), but i'm going to put a bit of effort into programming the next one to put it up there with, or highter than Boone's.For my own personal cog, i didnt go too wide on the base because i didnt feel like making new spacers. However, if i make them to sell, i'll make them how you guys would like them.
    I am also able to make them out of stainless, but i'd use a heat treated 17-4 instead of butter soft 304 stainless like most manufacturers.
    As for aluminum, you could get away with a 24t in the rear, as it's bigger than most granny gears on geared cranks. Expect to replace it slightly more frequently than your aluminum chain ring.
    I almost dont want to put this picture up because this is a rough prototype and a poor representation of what i can do. I'll make a final product later in the week and post it up for you guys.

  28. #28
    Strongbow or Bust!!!!
    Reputation: The Tractor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    430

    Gca??

    I don't know if Gene has any more GCAs (Granny Cod Adapters). I have 2 still but they are buried in storage.
    Rob
    Fermented Apple Juice rules!!!!!! BURRRRPP!!

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tribune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    264
    Chris king is supposed to start making 21-24+ cogs, at least thats what they said at Interbike. I have yet to see any in the LBS though...I run surlys for anything over 20. I'm also on a 29er.
    "The most persistent principles of the universe are accident and error." -Frank Herbert

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by tribune
    Chris king is supposed to start making 21-24+ cogs, at least thats what they said at Interbike. I have yet to see any in the LBS though...I run surlys for anything over 20. I'm also on a 29er.
    King is only going to be making up to a 23t, so close!

    Mark

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    I've made one out of titanium, which is currently on my bike. The first one was very basic (because i needed it quickly for a ride), but i'm going to put a bit of effort into programming the next one to put it up there with, or highter than Boone's.For my own personal cog, i didnt go too wide on the base because i didnt feel like making new spacers. However, if i make them to sell, i'll make them how you guys would like them.
    I am also able to make them out of stainless, but i'd use a heat treated 17-4 instead of butter soft 304 stainless like most manufacturers.
    As for aluminum, you could get away with a 24t in the rear, as it's bigger than most granny gears on geared cranks. Expect to replace it slightly more frequently than your aluminum chain ring.
    I almost dont want to put this picture up because this is a rough prototype and a poor representation of what i can do. I'll make a final product later in the week and post it up for you guys.
    **** that look great! I have no clue as to why I ordered the Boone cog in the first place. I rather have a cog like this that work. I could care less about bling
    What's the price and ETA for some Ti cogs? I would order a couple sizes to make it worth the time.

  32. #32
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    wow, i didnt know there was actually a market for these. i thought maybe Boone was getting out of it for a reason. I basically was just making these for myself, but like i said, i dont mind selling them.
    Lemme do a little research and see what i can do price wise. I'd like to make it affordable, but ti is damn expensive.
    If you guys could, give me to the end of the week. I'll fab up all the fixtures i need to make the stuff, price out the ti, and make a new updated sample cog to show you guys. Also, most importantly, get you a price.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14
    Have you ever taken a look at a Euro Asia fixed gear cog? They seem to have the best tooth profile. SMOOTH no chain snag or extra friction.

    I was talking to a guy named Tomity he's a Keirin rider in Japan and we had told me what he does to his chain ring and cog before racing.
    He said the step lines on chain rings and cogs make the bike slower. So if you smooth those out by lightly filing those lines off and polishing them to a mirror there is little to no chain drag. So I tried it and man what a difference! the bike is silent and smooth all the power goes to the wheel and is really nice.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14
    Yah there is a market for these. in and especially if there done right performance wise.

    I think I would rather wait and get some cogs from you. Because your kinda in the design stage still. Which is good for me because 1. Not just me but all the people on this site could help to produce a cog that is just amazing. and 2. there is a sort of test ben being formed here.

    Also I need cogs all the time for me and others in my area. So if you decide in time that this is something you could handle with everything else I sure you have going on man that would be the RAD!

    So with all that said there are some things about this cog that you posted that I would like to ask about. First being is this the same cog that you are using on your bike (machining wise)? Does the soft lines on ID of this cog tear up the free body hub. ( not square lines in the spline area round out free body hub? Do you see ware on your hub after removing the cog?

  35. #35
    Birthday Collector
    Reputation: ATBScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    ISuckatRiding - that is a pretty nice looking cog - was it machines as a 1/8" or a 3/32"? I would bet that there might be a decent market for a stainless cog with a nice wide-ish base and a range of teeth. Chainrings too. It is actually not all that easy to find 1/8" rings and cogs of quality - most stuff is 3/32" and the 1/8" just lasts so much longer with a nice fat BMX chain. 1/8" rings for a Shimano/etc... 104mm bolt pattern, might also be a good "common denominator" for the riders out there looking for quality 1/8" stuff.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,981
    Quote Originally Posted by ATBScott
    ISuckatRiding - that is a pretty nice looking cog - was it machines as a 1/8" or a 3/32"? I would bet that there might be a decent market for a stainless cog with a nice wide-ish base and a range of teeth. Chainrings too. It is actually not all that easy to find 1/8" rings and cogs of quality - most stuff is 3/32" and the 1/8" just lasts so much longer with a nice fat BMX chain. 1/8" rings for a Shimano/etc... 104mm bolt pattern, might also be a good "common denominator" for the riders out there looking for quality 1/8" stuff.
    Ahh, but then you cut out the other part of the market. I for one am sold on my 8spd chains for SS and would not buy a 1/8 cog

  37. #37
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by BEEZLEBOSS
    Yah there is a market for these. in and especially if there done right performance wise.

    I think I would rather wait and get some cogs from you. Because your kinda in the design stage still. Which is good for me because 1. Not just me but all the people on this site could help to produce a cog that is just amazing. and 2. there is a sort of test ben being formed here.

    Also I need cogs all the time for me and others in my area. So if you decide in time that this is something you could handle with everything else I sure you have going on man that would be the RAD!

    So with all that said there are some things about this cog that you posted that I would like to ask about. First being is this the same cog that you are using on your bike (machining wise)? Does the soft lines on ID of this cog tear up the free body hub. ( not square lines in the spline area round out free body hub? Do you see ware on your hub after removing the cog?
    Yea, i could deffinately use some input from you guys. I'm not really going to be making much money on this stuff, it's just cool to think that my stuff is out there and i would like it to be on a platform such as PW, Boone, ect.. and my intention is to continue producing it.

    As for your questions, this is the exact cog that it on my bike right now. I'm going to make a 17t with some more detail to it soon. As for wear, i didnt see anything worse than what was already there, but i dont see it doing any damage. There are radi in the corners, but they clear the splines on the hub body so only the flats engage. This is probably pretty hard to see from the photo, but i'll try to do a closeup shot on the next one. Boone and others do the same thing, although it appears that they might be slightly more relieved than mine. This was one of the things i had intended on working on. I also might try to make a broach to get rid of the radi completely, but i think it'll be fine as is.


    How wide do you guys prefer to have your cogs where it locates on the freehub body? I run a 9 speed wheel with my home made spacers, so i'd have to admit i'm a little new to the single speed specific hubs.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Ahh, but then you cut out the other part of the market. I for one am sold on my 8spd chains for SS and would not buy a 1/8 cog
    Long live the PC-58, or whatever the hell they call it now...

  39. #39
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by ATBScott
    ISuckatRiding - that is a pretty nice looking cog - was it machines as a 1/8" or a 3/32"? I would bet that there might be a decent market for a stainless cog with a nice wide-ish base and a range of teeth. Chainrings too. It is actually not all that easy to find 1/8" rings and cogs of quality - most stuff is 3/32" and the 1/8" just lasts so much longer with a nice fat BMX chain. 1/8" rings for a Shimano/etc... 104mm bolt pattern, might also be a good "common denominator" for the riders out there looking for quality 1/8" stuff.
    i'll deffinately keep that in mind as i was planning on making chainrings as well, but probably not ti. I would probably offer both 3/32" and 1/8" if it makes sense to do it.

    My first project is SS chain rings for M960 xtr cranks

  40. #40
    Beware the Blackbuck!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    469
    I wouldn't buy anything that wasn't 3/32, and there are a lot of other people that feel the same way. Some people get sucked in by a "single speed chain" and have a noisy annoying drive train for a while, no point to it in my opinion. From reading these boards from time to time the people that stick with 1/8th seem to be the minority.

    The widest cog I've seen is the Endless Kick Ass Cog, and it's 1/4 in/6.35 mm at the base... 5 or 6 mm would be where it's at in my opinion. The Surlys 5 mm wide and offset are but I prefer my centered Endless Cog, probably because I have spacers as thin as 1 mm. Another consideration is if you have a centered cog and get the chainline perfect, you can turn the cog around to get some more life out of it once the teeth start to go, and you don't have mess with your spacers at all.

  41. #41
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCast
    I wouldn't buy anything that wasn't 3/32, and there are a lot of other people that feel the same way. Some people get sucked in by a "single speed chain" and have a noisy annoying drive train for a while, no point to it in my opinion. From reading these boards from time to time the people that stick with 1/8th seem to be the minority.

    The widest cog I've seen is the Endless Kick Ass Cog, and it's 1/4 in/6.35 mm at the base... 5 or 6 mm would be where it's at in my opinion. The Surlys 5 mm wide and offset are but I prefer my centered Endless Cog, probably because I have spacers as thin as 1 mm. Another consideration is if you have a centered cog and get the chainline perfect, you can turn the cog around to get some more life out of it once the teeth start to go, and you don't have mess with your spacers at all.
    some very good points

    I am one of the minority that runs an 1/8" chain. I had a decent 3/32" chain snap 3 times on me in a race on a very steep course and i figured it was worth the extra insurance to run a beefier chain. However, i stick to 3/32" sprockets and chain rings.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14
    I too would rather use a 1/8 chain they run smoother and are way stronger.

  43. #43
    Birthday Collector
    Reputation: ATBScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    I would definitely think that offering both sizes are the best option to capture as much of the market as you can - esp if you can "build on-demand" for most orders.

    The 3/32" chain and rings are lighter and for some may be fine, but a 3/32" chain is designed to be more flexible to allow it to travel across the cogs of a cassette/freewheel and that allows it to bend in the midst of a gear-to-gear run, and if it gets off-line and there is no slack and spring-loaded derailluer to allow it to "inchworm" that segment, the chain will almost always break.

    1/8" chain and the teeth designed for it have a bit over 50% more surface area to bear load against. That tends to make them last a lot longer and also be better for torque-meister riders who grind up hills, etc... The pure strength in tension between 1/8" and 3/32" chains are negligible, but when you factor in grime, dirt, sand, sticks, midgets, and the other things that can get wedged into an SS chain system, the 1/8" with it's thicker plates and beefier teeth make for a more durable system, and I am willing to suffer a few ounces extra weight to have that peace of mind. I've had 3/32" chain fail, and while I have had 1/8" chain get damaged in a ride, I have always been able to pedal it out. I have also experienced that the 1/8" for some reason seems to run a little bit quieter too.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  44. #44
    Beware the Blackbuck!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    469
    This spew on the Surly blog summarizes how I think about the difference. It makes sense to me. I've also read (no source here) that the chains with the absolute highest tension strength are some of wipperman's 3/32nd chains... That said I imagine the breaking strength between the two is probably identical on similar quality chains, I don't think wider = better in tension, ATBScott's point about having more surface area to carry the load seems to be the most logical argument for 1/8th chains (unless you're doing some sweet grinds on your BMX bike and need a burly chain...)

    http://www.surlybikes.com/spew3.html

    4. 1/2x1/8" chains vs. 1/2x3/32" chains. 1/2x1/8" chains suck. Run whatever you want, but bigger isn’t better here. Yeah, they’re wider, but according to manufacturer-supplied data, they’re not stronger and they are definitely not of better quality. Multi-speed drivetrains is where the bucks are at, and chains that work on such drivetrains are where the manufacturers of chains showcase their innovations and developments in quality. The rollers are better, the plates are better, the pins are stronger, and the construction method (riveting procedure) is better on all multi-speed 3/32" chains. I guess if you grind your chainring and chain down the handrail every night at the local pub, a bigger 1/2x1/8 " chain will last longer, but most of us don’t and it won’t.

  45. #45
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCast
    This spew on the Surly blog summarizes how I think about the difference. It makes sense to me. I've also read (no source here) that the chains with the absolute highest tension strength are some of wipperman's 3/32nd chains... That said I imagine the breaking strength between the two is probably identical on similar quality chains, I don't think wider = better in tension, ATBScott's point about having more surface area to carry the load seems to be the most logical argument for 1/8th chains (unless you're doing some sweet grinds on your BMX bike and need a burly chain...)

    http://www.surlybikes.com/spew3.html
    The side plates on my 1/8" chain are a bit beefier than my 3/32" chains. Side plate breakage is where i have my issues, so this is why i went with the chain i did. However, i am sure there might be 3/32" chains out there that are as strong or stronger, but frankly i'm a cheap bastard and i dont like paying for stuff. I got my current chain free from a sponsor about 3 years ago.
    BUT, people who spend the money on my or Boone's cogs are likely to have high end single speed specific chains, so this might be a mute point.
    Surly makes stainless chainrings with a lower yield strength than aluminum rings, so i take what they say with a grain of salt

  46. #46
    Birthday Collector
    Reputation: ATBScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    It would be sorta sweet if someone made an uber-quality 1/8" chain for SS - but the real question might be, would it really run any better than a $10 - $15 KMC? I think it is sort of "funny" that I can get about 750 - 800 miles of off-roading on a $39.00 3/32" SRAM chain, and close to 3,000 on a $14.99 1/8" KMC chain on my SS. And that SS has nearly 4,500 miles on the original ALUMINUM 33t ring and 20t steel cog. The ring is about done, but the cog still looks good. Yes, I am pretty meticulous about cleaning my chain - but clean the geared bike too. And all of my chains are replaced when the .75mm tang on the chain checker can drop in... and that check is done about every 6 or 7 rides once I have had the chain a while. I do have to say that the best wearing chain I have on a bike is a Dura Ace Narrow 3/32 for the 10-spd stuff - it has about 6,000 miles on it and still doesn't drop the .75 yet. Expensive, but good value. Ultegra/XT level chains are only good for about 1,500 road/400 off-road miles. The 3/32" chain failures for me were sideplates blowing out at the rivet... The only 1/8" failure I have had was the roller bushings failing on a PC-1, which was only a few weeks old. Put a KMC Z-410 on and went right back to being trouble-free.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  47. #47
    Beware the Blackbuck!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    469
    That's some impressive data on your chain upkeep ATBScott. I'm curious if your 750-800 miles on your SRAM chain is on a geared bike, or if it's just one of their 8 speed chains on a single speed?

    Something to note, easily the most suggested "best single speed chain" around this forum I see is the KMC Z610HX. It's a single speed specific 3/32nd chain. Beefy sideplates and rivets, like what you find on a 1/8th chain. They haven't thinned or shaped the sideplates for shifting, so I wonder how it compares to similarly built 1/8th chains built for single speed. As far as I can tell KMC recently started making another, higher end single speed specific 3/32nd (810?), but I have heard anything about it.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Some interesting discusions here on cog design and 1/8 vs. 3/32 drivetrains, so I will throw my opinions in as well.

    First, I use SRAM 3/32 8 speed chains only. Mostly PC-58 and PC-68, but I am starting to run low on those, so I will be moving on the newer 850 series at some point. I tried a PC-1 and some KMC 1/8 chain before and they sucked. The PC-1 stretched very quickly and made funny cracking noises, even when clean and well lubed, and the KMC stretched so much after 3 rides that it was useless.

    Now onto the cog design. I would love to see Isuckatriding manufacture some nice Ti SS cogs, and would put some money down right now. I am obviously looking for 3/32 and 24t. As far as the base width, anything more than 5 or 6 mm would be fine, and I think your machining on the spline is fine, no need to brouch anything. As long as the radii are high enough to clear the flat portion it is fine. My only suggestion would be to pin spacers to the cog to make the wide base. As you said, with Ti being so expesive, I think it would be very expensive to start with 1/4" material and then machine down to the final thickness. It would also result in a lot of wasted material and much longer run times. Maybe just pin a spacer on one side to make it a little easier.

    Mark

  49. #49
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    Some interesting discusions here on cog design and 1/8 vs. 3/32 drivetrains, so I will throw my opinions in as well.

    First, I use SRAM 3/32 8 speed chains only. Mostly PC-58 and PC-68, but I am starting to run low on those, so I will be moving on the newer 850 series at some point. I tried a PC-1 and some KMC 1/8 chain before and they sucked. The PC-1 stretched very quickly and made funny cracking noises, even when clean and well lubed, and the KMC stretched so much after 3 rides that it was useless.

    Now onto the cog design. I would love to see Isuckatriding manufacture some nice Ti SS cogs, and would put some money down right now. I am obviously looking for 3/32 and 24t. As far as the base width, anything more than 5 or 6 mm would be fine, and I think your machining on the spline is fine, no need to brouch anything. As long as the radii are high enough to clear the flat portion it is fine. My only suggestion would be to pin spacers to the cog to make the wide base. As you said, with Ti being so expesive, I think it would be very expensive to start with 1/4" material and then machine down to the final thickness. It would also result in a lot of wasted material and much longer run times. Maybe just pin a spacer on one side to make it a little easier.

    Mark
    I was toying with the idea to make the spacers out of aluminum. What do you guys think about that? It would keep the price AND the weight down plus i think it'd look cool. With enough interest, i might be able to get it anodized and the contrast in color between the ti and anodized aluminum would be pretty slick. Maybe black so it wont clash with any bike's color schemes?

  50. #50
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    so i've been thinking on this, and i have some ideas. first off, i'd like to make it out of a solid piece. I'm guessing Boone rivets on the side plates because the cogs are possibly made out of the scrap material he cuts out of the center of his chainrings. Pretty slick idea on his part, but since i'm starting from scratch, i'd rather do it with simplicity in mind. Also, i'm trying to find ways to get the weight down without having tons of nooks and crannies for dirt and grease to hide. This is a pet peeve with me, as i'm sure it is with some of you guys with how much you cherrish your rides (and rightfully so).

  51. #51
    Beware the Blackbuck!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    469
    If you're trying to make the cutouts easy to clean, you've gotta figure that simple shapes for any cutouts, like the one you made for yourself, would be the easiest to keep clean, and get a rag into.

    As far as pinned bases, I think it would be a good idea if it really did cut the cost, but only if you could keep the cog from chewing up a freehub body. I'm not too worried, because I've got a ti freehub body, but there are aluminum ones out there. With a pinned cassette, the individual cogs move enough to mark up the freehub, I would imagine it would be the same story with a pinned single speed cog. If not, that would be my vote just for economy of materials.

  52. #52
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCast
    If you're trying to make the cutouts easy to clean, you've gotta figure that simple shapes for any cutouts, like the one you made for yourself, would be the easiest to keep clean, and get a rag into.

    As far as pinned bases, I think it would be a good idea if it really did cut the cost, but only if you could keep the cog from chewing up a freehub body. I'm not too worried, because I've got a ti freehub body, but there are aluminum ones out there. With a pinned cassette, the individual cogs move enough to mark up the freehub, I would imagine it would be the same story with a pinned single speed cog. If not, that would be my vote just for economy of materials.
    I honestly believe he did it that was just to use the free material he had on hand. I cant think of any benefit to it, as the labor involved to do it that way would outweigh the material costs involved in making it a couple mm's thicker if one was to start from scratch. As soon as i wrap up my cad files i'll post up a snapshot of what i had in mind. hopefully you guys like!

  53. #53
    Birthday Collector
    Reputation: ATBScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    I.S.A.R. - If I can vote - I would say make them out of STEEL and (at least for the 1/8" cogs) make them fairly thick at the bottom and tapered up to the proper thickness (thinness?) just below the trough's cutout. Then put in 4 or 5 larger "windows" for weight removal. For the thicker cogs you can do that - for 3/32" you might need more, smaller cutouts so the cog won't flex under load (more "spokes") The Boone design looks cool with the swept-spoke look and all, but like you said - more areas for dirt to accumulate. Maybe offer them in Alu also - Ti is nice but I don't know if I would personally spend the $$ for a Ti cog for my SS - cogs and rings are wear items and I'd rather have a drilled-or-machined-out steel cog than a Ti one that might weigh a few grams less, but not wear as long... Alu 1/8" chainriings for 104mm crank bolt patterns would be good too...
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  54. #54
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by ATBScott
    I.S.A.R. - If I can vote - I would say make them out of STEEL and (at least for the 1/8" cogs) make them fairly thick at the bottom and tapered up to the proper thickness (thinness?) just below the trough's cutout. Then put in 4 or 5 larger "windows" for weight removal. For the thicker cogs you can do that - for 3/32" you might need more, smaller cutouts so the cog won't flex under load (more "spokes") The Boone design looks cool with the swept-spoke look and all, but like you said - more areas for dirt to accumulate. Maybe offer them in Alu also - Ti is nice but I don't know if I would personally spend the $$ for a Ti cog for my SS - cogs and rings are wear items and I'd rather have a drilled-or-machined-out steel cog than a Ti one that might weigh a few grams less, but not wear as long... Alu 1/8" chainriings for 104mm crank bolt patterns would be good too...
    some good points. i was going to make both stainless and ti, fyi.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,981
    Sounds really good. I could be interested in some good stainless cogs

  56. #56
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Sorry for the delay fellas, it's been a hectic couple weeks for me. I made this titanium cog for a buddy as a going away present, so i thought i'd share. This is kind of what i had in mind for production, however the lightening pockets will be a little smaller, and there will be some on the back side staggered from the front ones. This is a 17t and it's about 5mm wide at the base, and 3/32" at the teeth. It is a centered offset, so it is reversible without changing your chainline. This one weighs in at 25 grams, and the new design *should* be a bit less, and probably a little stronger to boot. I also did kind of a burnished finish on this, but i think i may just stick with a machined finish next time. My goal was to keep it simple so it doesnt have 100 little crevices to clean with a q-tip. Since these pockets dont go all the way through, it can be wiped clean pretty easily.
    What do you guys think?

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    What do you guys think?
    Looks good, but did you crunch the numbers yet?

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    123
    Rennen makes cogs up to 25T.....

    $33.00 seems reasonable....

    Don't know much about them, but they look pretty nice.....

    Their tensioners are well made....

    http://www.rennendesigngroup.com/Online_Store.html

  59. #59
    Beware the Blackbuck!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    469
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    What do you guys think?
    I think that thing looks sweet.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943

    Looks good!

    I like it. Looks a little different than the other stuff out there, which is a good thing! I like the big radii on the pockets, as you said should make it easier to clean. If you make a 24t, I am in. As long as it costs less than the Singlestar cog!

    Mark

  61. #61
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    thanks guys! i am positive it will cost less than the singlestar cogs, but i am still working on titanium quotes. so far its looking to be in the $100 range for 6AL-4V titanium, and $50 for stainless. Right now I'm thinking of using 316 stainless which is more corrosion resistant and will wear less than the 304 stainless which most people use. It's more expensive, but i don't want to cut corners on my stuff. I can do 7075-T6 aluminum as well for $30.
    Finish will be a bit better than what i've made so far once i get all the tooling developed and the process down.

    It blows my mind that they're getting $200 for those cogs. There is considerably less work involved in machining the singlestar cog than what goes into mine.
    and yes, i can make ya a 24t!

  62. #62
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    also, would you guys prefer a 6mm or 5mm base?
    i think i'm going to offer anodized finishes on both the ti and aluminum as well.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    also, would you guys prefer a 6mm or 5mm base?
    i think i'm going to offer anodized finishes on both the ti and aluminum as well.
    5mm is fine with me, as my Hope SS hub uses a steel freehub body anyway. But for the guys that use an aluminum freehub body, the wider the better. Maybe it will depend on raw material pricing? Is the material just priced by the pound, or priced by the size? I guess you can't go wrong with the thicker material as long as it doesn't cost a lot more.

    And just shoot me a PM or E-mail when you are ready to make that 24t cog.

    Mark

  64. #64
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    5mm is fine with me, as my Hope SS hub uses a steel freehub body anyway. But for the guys that use an aluminum freehub body, the wider the better. Maybe it will depend on raw material pricing? Is the material just priced by the pound, or priced by the size? I guess you can't go wrong with the thicker material as long as it doesn't cost a lot more.

    And just shoot me a PM or E-mail when you are ready to make that 24t cog.

    Mark
    5mm or 6mm shouldnt effect pricing much since i think i'm going to have to purchase 1/4" material anyways.
    If i can get at least 6 pre orders for ti, i will place the order for material and get rolling. If anyone deffinatly wants one, shoot me a pm and i will respond back once i get 6 orders with my payment info.
    Price will be $100 each any size up to 24t, plus shipping ($5 in the united states, $13 international)
    1-2 weeks for delivery, but i'm aiming for sooner.

  65. #65
    Team Captain
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,322
    Bolt on ISO fixed cogs would be sweet in Ti...

  66. #66
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by ScaryJerry
    Bolt on ISO fixed cogs would be sweet in Ti...
    i can do that as well. figure about $90. If i can get some volume on them it'd be cheaper for material.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,943
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    5mm or 6mm shouldnt effect pricing much since i think i'm going to have to purchase 1/4" material anyways.
    If i can get at least 6 pre orders for ti, i will place the order for material and get rolling. If anyone deffinatly wants one, shoot me a pm and i will respond back once i get 6 orders with my payment info.
    Price will be $100 each any size up to 24t, plus shipping ($5 in the united states, $13 international)
    1-2 weeks for delivery, but i'm aiming for sooner.
    If you are buying 1/4" material, I would just leave it as thick as possible in the middle. PM sent!

    Mark

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AM Octopus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    121
    I'm interested in one of the Ti cogs. I'm running the Chris King cogs right now but would like to try something different.

    PM sent

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    207
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    I tried a 22t Endless for a couple of rides a few years ago, and the teeth showed significant mushrooming.
    Endless cogs are part butter.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    207
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    5mm or 6mm shouldnt effect pricing much since i think i'm going to have to purchase 1/4" material anyways.
    If i can get at least 6 pre orders for ti, i will place the order for material and get rolling. If anyone deffinatly wants one, shoot me a pm and i will respond back once i get 6 orders with my payment info.
    Price will be $100 each any size up to 24t, plus shipping ($5 in the united states, $13 international)
    1-2 weeks for delivery, but i'm aiming for sooner.
    I'm in. Check your pm's

  71. #71
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    cool, thanks guys!
    If i can get one more person interested i'll start accepting payments and i'll go pick up the material. Luckly it's local.

    Please let me know what sizes you want as well. i can make anything from 12t to 24t. I can go bigger but the price might need to be slightly higher.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    cool, thanks guys!
    If i can get one more person interested i'll start accepting payments and i'll go pick up the material. Luckly it's local.

    Please let me know what sizes you want as well. i can make anything from 12t to 24t. I can go bigger but the price might need to be slightly higher.
    I'm not in for ti at this point. Let me know if you do steel or alu...

  73. #73
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I'm not in for ti at this point. Let me know if you do steel or alu...
    sorry, i thought i posted the prices for all 3.....

    Titanium: $100
    316 Stainless Steel (more wear and corrosion resistant than 304): $50
    7075-T6 aluminum (strongest grade of aluminum i can get, but still be prepared to replace it often so i sugest it for racing only): $30

    Shipping is $4.95 for in the USA, and $12.95 for overseas via USPS priority

    Also, i'm geared up for doing chainrings now, mostly in 7075-T6 aluminum, but i can do other materials as well. Pricing and prototypes to come, but PM me if you have a custom ring in mind. Im already making personalized rings for someone's fixie.

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    316 Stainless Steel (more wear and corrosion resistant than 304): $50
    How will these compare to a Surly cog as far as weight goes? (considering a 23th)

  75. #75
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    How will these compare to a Surly cog as far as weight goes? (considering a 23th)
    well my stainless 17t is about 15% lighter than a Surly 17t. As for the difference in weight of the 23t, i would imagine it will be about the same percentage, but the 17t surly is the only one i've actually weighed (53g).
    Surly uses an alloy steel, not stainless steel, and i believe they only make 13t - 22t from what i've read.

  76. #76
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by Yeti Clyde
    Rennen makes cogs up to 25T.....

    $33.00 seems reasonable....

    Don't know much about them, but they look pretty nice.....

    Their tensioners are well made....

    http://www.rennendesigngroup.com/Online_Store.html
    they look like they have a black oxide finish, which means they are just steel, and not stainless steel. Black oxide is technically rust, and will rust pretty quickly if exposed to moisture.

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    123
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    they look like they have a black oxide finish, which means they are just steel, and not stainless steel. Black oxide is technically rust, and will rust pretty quickly if exposed to moisture.

    7075 T-6 Aluminum according to them.......

    http://www.rennendesigngroup.com/Cog_Desc.htm

  78. #78
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by Yeti Clyde
    7075 T-6 Aluminum according to them.......

    http://www.rennendesigngroup.com/Cog_Desc.htm
    ah ok, i guess thats what i get for not reading lol
    for some reason their anodize looked more like black oxide in that picture.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chairthruster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    794
    great stuff ISAR. While you are collecting market data, I'll cast another vote for 1/8", I am sold on SRAM PC1 nickle chains...

    Can you do a 15T?

  80. #80
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by chairthruster
    great stuff ISAR. While you are collecting market data, I'll cast another vote for 1/8", I am sold on SRAM PC1 nickle chains...

    Can you do a 15T?
    i can do 1/8" for anyone wanting it, not a problem!

    I can do any size from 12t-24t
    Larger sizes are doable, but will cost slightly more.

    If i can get one more order on the ti ones, i will order material and start accepting payments!

  81. #81
    Full Tilt Boogie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,650
    I don't know if this was stated earlier, but would you run these through a business that has liability insurance? Much as it sucks, if you are going to sell these, you really need to protect yourself, family, and belongings. Such is life these days in Lawsuitamerica.

    Edit: Goes without saying, but these are beautiful. I'd be especially interested in sizes 23-26t in stainless for 36er use if you get these going.
    I sell bikes here. Check out the Blog here. Facebook.

  82. #82
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by benwitt11
    I don't know if this was stated earlier, but would you run these through a business that has liability insurance? Much as it sucks, if you are going to sell these, you really need to protect yourself, family, and belongings. Such is life these days in Lawsuitamerica.

    Edit: Goes without saying, but these are beautiful. I'd be especially interested in sizes 23-26t in stainless for 36er use if you get these going.
    My machine shop is a legit business, as small as it may be.

    Stainless and aluminum cogs don't have a minimum order, so i can make some if you're ready to order
    just shoot me a pm!

  83. #83
    Full Tilt Boogie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,650
    Please don't take any offense. I had a friend seriously screwed by a bunch of that insurance business!

    I will send you a PM for a set of tensioners at least, really nice looking stuff!
    I sell bikes here. Check out the Blog here. Facebook.

  84. #84
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by benwitt11
    Please don't take any offense. I had a friend seriously screwed by a bunch of that insurance business!

    I will send you a PM for a set of tensioners at least, really nice looking stuff!

    No offense taken, i appreciate the concern!

    And thanks for the compliment!

  85. #85
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Well guys,
    I've had more than enough interest, so i've begun to take orders. My Paypal is d.wilcox@imp-mfg.com
    Shipping within the US is $4.95 and $12.95 international via USPS Priority. Please add (unfortunately) 8.75% sales tax if you are in California.

    Also, check out my thread that includes my chainrings and other goodies.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=540625

  86. #86
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Hmm well so far noone who said they wanted them has replied back, are we still in? I just want to make sure before i order a $600 piece of material.

  87. #87
    banned
    Reputation: cruso414's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,101
    come on guys... I ordered a 102 bcd (XTR) custom annodized chainring from him. Let's support one of our own guys!

  88. #88
    Birthday Collector
    Reputation: ATBScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    ISuckAtRiding - I will be interested in a new chainring - likely aluminum or Stainless, but still rolling what I got and don't have the need or extraneous coinage to do it right now... But I like the way your work looks and would like to support you - when I need it! What are the prices for a 33t/104mm BCD chanring in Alu and Stainless?
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


Members who have read this thread: 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.