2012 Origin8 Scout build post- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2012 Origin8 Scout build post

    Can't really call it a thread, because the build is done. First, the backstory:

    I'd been wanting to dip my toe in the SS pond since I'd started mountain biking a few years ago. I saw a used Kona Unit frame come up on Craigslist last year, pretty cheap, with a King headset included, as well as both SS and geared sliding dropouts. Had to jump. Perhaps I should have asked myself why the price was so low.

    I'm pretty sure the frame was tweaked from the moment I had it. I had a really hard time getting the rear caliper to line up properly -- as soon as I tightened everything down, things shifted. But with some ingenuity and Avid pivot washers, I got it working OK.



    While it was running well, the bike was great. I loved it, fell completely in love with SS riding. Here in the Mid-Atlantic area, a lot of the trails we ride are perfect for SS -- flowy, ups and downs but not too extreme on either end of the spectrum. My fitness and strength have been improving because of this bike.

    However, all was not perfect. The bike ate a brand new Race Face ISIS bottom bracket in less than 6 months. I finallly woke up and smelled the coffee (so thoughtfully provided by the coffee grinder to which the cranks were attached). Sure, I could spend money chasnig down problems, try getting the bb shell faced and chased, but good money after bad and all that.

    I decided to buy a frame and transfer the rest of the parts over. My LBS is a Surly dealer, and my friend Josh told me the Ogre was the bike for me. I almost pulled the trigger, but then I remembered a review I read on twentynineinches about the Origin8 Scout. Cheap steel frame, not the lightest, but strong and versatile.

    For the 2011 version, you could buy just the frame for about $200. However, in 2012, Origin8 came out with a new frame that included the fork. I'd have been happy with a 2011 since I'm keeping my suspension fork (my front wheel is a QR15), but I couldn't get one. So, LBS ordered me a 2012. The price was still much less than the Surly, at a six-pack over $300.



    The frame looks great - I'm surprised at the quality of the welds, paint and decals. The Scout frame (with seatpost clamp) weighs about a half pound more than the Kona (also with clamp).

    Kona:


    Scout:


    The tear-down and build-up took me a few hours yesterday. I made a headset remover out of a piece of copper pipe just like I read on here, and pressed the headset into the new frame with a piece of threaded rod, some 2x4 chunks, and some washers and nuts.



    The dropouts are obviously different. Kona's sliding dropouts are extremely trick, and make setting things up (and removing the wheel) really easy. The Scout's track ends make it a little trickier. The location of the rear caliper mount on the chainstay, inside the triangle, is supposed to make wheel removal simpler, but it has the effect of making caliper installation and adjustment a little harder. You still have to loosen the tensioners completely to remove the wheel, so every time you need to remove the wheel you must retension the chain (unlike the Kona). I've also ordered a solid axle and nuts for the rear wheel, since I've gotten advice that QR doesn't clamp well enough for track-ends.



    Overall, the bike looks great, and based on a little sidewalk ride, it feels great too!



    Updates to come after the first ride.

  2. #2
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    That right there is a great bike. I, for one, am a huge fan of inexpensive, versatile, and decent quality frames. This here is a perfect example. That's the kind of frame that you'll have around for 10 years and can build into into various types of bikes. Very nice.

  3. #3
    The need for singlespeed
    Reputation: zaskaranddriver's Avatar
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    ^Well said. I'm another fan of the practical build. I'll be keeping an eye out for that sled on the trails!

  4. #4
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    Nice frame and buildup. Thanks for the story too. Now enjoy the new ride!

  5. #5
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    quick release works fine on track dropouts. I have bianchi sok and the qr holds solid. Make sure you use xt skewers though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjphillips View Post
    quick release works fine on track dropouts. I have bianchi sok and the qr holds solid. Make sure you use xt skewers though.
    I do have an XT skewer on there. Maybe I'll see how it does before I convert it over.

  7. #7
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    I have a 2010 Scout. The caliper mount is on the seat stay making it even more of a chore to remove the wheel. Mines a 19,If this frame geometry is the same your gonna love this bike. Very short chain stays. Climbs like a goat, has a very soft ride. Not twisty, just compliant. I have a rigid carbon fork on mine so it weighs just under 26 lbs with bb7 160's
    Seeking MB-2 Fork (19.3), Ritchey FD post silver 26.8

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