X-fusion revel x upside down fork- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    X-fusion revel x upside down fork

    These are still available from “iron horse” i know a few people got one from them a couple of years ago. They are now $900 inc shipping.

    All I’ve read is performance is amazing - looking for some real world experiences if possible.

    Why are they available in taiwan and now europe/US and why never fully released.

    Surely with no crown it will fit a 29 inch wheel?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael.oakes4 View Post
    Surely with no crown it will fit a 29 inch wheel?
    Do you mean no arch rather than no crown? Because that fork definitely has a crown.

    Hitting the actual crown on bottom out is much more dangerous than the tyre rubbing the arch and you can't really have much idea what will fit until you try it.

  3. #3
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    Yea my bad - arch...

  4. #4
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    The chassis is great. Better than a conventional single crown fork in my opinion.
    The damper is just their Roughcut HLR unit. The ones I rode could do with a small tune. Not sure how they compare to the current model tunes.
    Better than Fox / Rockshox in my opinion.
    If you don't like doing routine maintenance then any USD fork should not be considered though.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KoolGrandWizardLuke View Post
    The chassis is great. Better than a conventional single crown fork in my opinion.
    The damper is just their Roughcut HLR unit. The ones I rode could do with a small tune. Not sure how they compare to the current model tunes.
    Better than Fox / Rockshox in my opinion.
    If you don't like doing routine maintenance then any USD fork should not be considered though.
    This comment makes no sense.

    USD forks generally have better lubrication due to the bath or semi-bath oil sitting at the bottom of the fork and constantly lubricating the legs. In general, they would require less maintenance and provide better lubrication, unless x-fusion simply screwed up the implementation. I've owned many USD forks, single and dual crown.

    The chassis of a single crown USD fork is inherently worse than a conventional one with a brake arch. Although it still lacks torsional rigidity, a dual crown USD at least gets the second crown to help reduce twisting forces. The end result is a fork that kind of goes where it wants in rock gardens and rough terrain, rather than where you point it. There are ways around this with exotic design and manufacturing, but it costs more, weighs more, and if applied to a conventional fork, would result in that much better of a fork. There's no good reason to do this, except to "look moto".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    inherently worse

    I think your hate for USD forks is what gets you out of bed in the morning.

  7. #7
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    usd forks let your front wheel wander worse than a stray dog


  8. #8
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    The Revel has keyed stanchions to increase torsional rigidity, so the negative comments are based on previous inverted designs and may not apply here.

    That said, I get the feeling the keyed stanchions caused binding on the trail, and that is why the Revel never really hit the market. It was originally designed with 3 keyways and then went to 2 in I'm remembering correctly. They touted torsional rigidity numbers on par with the stiffest competitors, with fore-aft rigidity numbers far superior. Something had to be wrong with its performance to never hit full production.

    I'd love to spend a few weeks on one, I'm a sucker for the inverted design. You be hard pressed to get me to drop 900 bucks on one though, especially with X-fusion not helping customers with at home service info or tools being available.

  9. #9
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    Xfusion has non existent CS and service now.

    I used to be a huge fan, but they dropped the ball. It's basically an Asian company with no local support.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    The Revel has keyed stanchions to increase torsional rigidity, so the negative comments are based on previous inverted designs and may not apply here.
    guilty as charged..


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Xfusion has non existent CS and service now.

    I used to be a huge fan, but they dropped the ball. It's basically an Asian company with no local support.
    Sent them an email, never got a reply.
    Maybe I need to have Syd & Macky send it for me?
    Ride, Enjoy...Repeat.

  12. #12
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    Maintenance is fine if the bits are readily available. As long as the damping and air spring is up to scratch usd should be far superior for fore-aft stiffness which is a big one (bumps while on the brakes). 140mm max on a 29 may be a deal braker though unless other have experimented with more.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    The Revel has keyed stanchions to increase torsional rigidity, so the negative comments are based on previous inverted designs and may not apply here.
    That was my point, it takes exotic design and manufacturing to overcome the inherent limitations, $$ and time that if spent on a right-side-up fork, produces something even better. The "advantages" of USD are simply BS. Unsprung weight? It's not like there's zero, there are still dropouts, lower stanchions, the lower internals, oil, axle, brake, rim, tire, etc. When you add up the difference, it's minuscule, because one-piece aluminum and magnesium lowers are extremely light on conventional forks. Lubrication? Well, to some extent this is an inherent advantage, just because some of the semi-bath stuff over the years has sucked balls, like older fox shocks. But with better semi-bath systems (seals and capacities) it's far less of an advantage. The flipside is the USD fork bathes your rotor/caliper in oil when the seal gives out, so there are negatives too. Stiffer in fore-aft? Well that just comes from bigger stanchions and it's not that hard to increase stanchion size and get the same effect with a conventional fork, this is usually a pretty small weight increase too. Otherwise, the USD fork misses out on the extra bushing overlap that the DC version gets.

    When you do a conventional dual crown fork vs single crown, the bushing overlap is the same.

    When you do an inverted dual crown fork vs single crown, the bushing overlap is radically less on the single crown. This is one of the reasons it works so poorly in practice. There's a good picture on the internet of what happened when they tried to run a single-crown marzocchi moto fork on a moto...(spoiler: it snapped).

    Keyed stanchions are one way to try and make it work, stiff carbon one-piece units are another, with keyed/hex axles being yet another, but it's like trying to polish a turd. Yes, with enough money, engineering and production going to exotic lengths, it can work, but you would be better off with a conventional fork and spend all that extra money for some fancy custom damping tuning.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  14. #14
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    My comment does make sense.

    The reason they are no good if you don't like doing routine maintenance is because they drop all their oil once the seals are worn or damaged. On a right side up fork where the oil is only used as a outer bushing lubricant they can continue to be ridden for a long time, even if the seals will not hold oil while upside down.
    The maintenance schedules are essentially the same. But from my knowledge it seems that very few people actually maintain their forks as per the manufacturers recommendations.

    The single crown USD fork is only inherently worse at certain criteria. It is also better at certain criteria.
    When talking pound for pound the USD Revel X chassis transmits less deflection to the spring and damper systems. This means that both the spring and damper systems inside experience less binding and are free to move smoothly under high loads.
    this fork does have an 'exotic' design as mentioned above, in that the stanchions are keyed to the uppers. The fork also has a 20mm axle with pinch bolt to increase stiffness.
    The good reason to do this are reasons I mentioned. Also to increase fore/aft stiffness.

    I had 2 of the Marzocchi Shiver SC forks when I was younger. Never a problem riding them on dirt jumps, free riding, or even general trail riding.

  15. #15
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    I'm still looking for a SC Dorado at a great price.

    To add to my collection. I've already got something like 5x more forks than bikes.
    Owner of www.shockcraft.co.nz, Mech Engineer, Tuner, Manitou, Motorex, Vorsprung EPTC, SKF, Enduro
    www.dougal.co.nz

  16. #16
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    Lol can never have too many. Theres just something “right” about USD despite the design challenges. Its not right for manufacturer margins though unfortunately.
    I’ll probably chicken out and get a Mezzer for the new build instead so I’m not limited on travel options in the future.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougal View Post
    I'm still looking for a SC Dorado at a great price.

    To add to my collection. I've already got something like 5x more forks than bikes.
    I never got to actually own one. But I have ridden single crown Dorados many times. If I recall correctly they were better than the Marzocchi Shiver SC. Would have to be going on 10 years ago since I rode either.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dougal View Post
    I'm still looking for a SC Dorado at a great price.

    To add to my collection. I've already got something like 5x more forks than bikes.
    I have been looking for 10+ years with no luck.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by KoolGrandWizardLuke View Post
    My comment does make sense.

    The reason they are no good if you don't like doing routine maintenance is because they drop all their oil once the seals are worn or damaged. On a right side up fork where the oil is only used as a outer bushing lubricant they can continue to be ridden for a long time, even if the seals will not hold oil while upside down.
    No, you said that if you don't like doing maintenance, than any USD fork is not for you. Being open bath (damping) is not an inherent feature of a USD fork, as an example, Maverick was not open-bath. A right side up or USD fork can be either open bath or semi or dry (just using grease). As an open bath fork, a marzocchi shiver SC is going to be pretty reliable, the only reason the oil gets gunky is due to the terrible non-anodized marzocchi internals. It's not inherently less reliable or in more need of maintenance because it's a USD, as you are claiming.

    True, very few people maintain their forks as they should. Probably the worst forks then are the semi-bath and dry forks, to make sure that they are lubricated and that the bushings are not eating into the stanchions. In that respect, due gravity not helping out as much, a conventional fork is a little worse. People not maintaining their forks is a much bigger issue and not specific to USD or conventional.


    The single crown USD fork is only inherently worse at certain criteria. It is also better at certain criteria...This fork does have an 'exotic' design as mentioned above, in that the stanchions are keyed to the uppers. The fork also has a 20mm axle with pinch bolt to increase stiffness.
    The good reason to do this are reasons I mentioned. Also to increase fore/aft stiffness.
    The stanchions being keyed and a 20mm axle with pinch bolts has nothing to do with increasing fore/aft stiffness. Fore-aft stiffness on inverted forks comes from the uppers being larger than the lowers and the lowers sliding into the uppers through the travel, helping to "reinforce" the fork. A similar thing happens with conventional forks, but since the uppers connected to the crown are inherently smaller, not to the same extent. The way to offset this is to increase the stanchion size on a conventional fork, like the Fox 36, new marzocchi mezzer chassis, etc. Keyed stanchions are one way to work around the inherent torsional limitations, but they introduce a host of issues with tolerances, play, etc., it is one way to make the system work though.

    I had 2 of the Marzocchi Shiver SC forks when I was younger. Never a problem riding them on dirt jumps, free riding, or even general trail riding.
    I too had marzocchi Shivers, SC and DC. Not sure if you are actually being serious here, the SC was a crazy noodle of a fork and scary as hell in any technical terrain. The DC was "acceptable", but a Boxxer/Monster/40, literally any conventional DC fork-was miles ahead for torsional rigidity in rough terrain.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    I have been looking for 10+ years with no luck.
    Millennium? That was the cooler fork IMO.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  21. #21
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    I believe the costs got out of hand and they quit marketing it in the US. As others have pointed out, the keyed stanchions solved the USD issues. FWIW I had a Stratos S8 USD fork and to this day nothing has matched the damping that fork had. The downside was it weighed a ton and I was able to flex it enough to get brake rub but the actual performance was unworldly good and I've heard the same about the Dorado so...

    Have FUN!

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    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

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