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  1. #1
    Trail Cubist
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    Upgrading...is it worth it?

    My wife has an old Trek 6000 mountain bike (circa 2001-2002?). It has a Manitou Magnum fork...and because there's no way we can afford to buy her a new, good MTB right now...I'm just exploring possible upgrades.

    The Manitou fork seems okay...but would a cheap (and more modern) Rock Shox Reba or Tora be WAY better than the old Manitou? Meaning, would it be worth spending $150 on?

    Waitaminit...I just realized the bike has V-brakes (and the mounts are on the forks). Hmm...are there any modern forks ($150 or less) with V-brake mounts that would be far better than the Manitou fork?

    I could also just rebuild the Manitou and replace the oil (never been done in 10 years...)
    Here's the Manitou fork...



    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  2. #2
    Haro Sonix LT VL120
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    Yeah, prolly anything would be better than that. The seals are prolly gone and theres prolly not much damping.

  3. #3
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    i had these on my hardtail and there pretty sweet

    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...-Fork-2010.htm

    plus they have both V and disc mounts so you could even get a front disc set up for her as well. i also run V in the back and disc on the front on my hardtail , so far it seems to be a pretty good combo.

  4. #4
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    Don't do it.
    Save cash.
    Get bike.
    You pay $200 for even the cheapest fork and it will make little difference to whatever PoS that came off.
    So, if cash is tight, sell the whole bike for maybe $300. Take that and the 200+++ you saved by not buying a fork.
    Buy a KHS built.
    525 $799
    Get it for her birthday. Maybe she'll s**k your c**k after she destroys you on the trail w nice new bike.
    Last edited by Ecogeek; 04-17-2011 at 06:29 PM.

  5. #5
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    Ecogeek is right

    The end
    i used to be a hot tar roofer, ya i remember that......day.

  6. #6
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    I realise that whilst my answer is not bad.
    I did not answer your Q. I probably shouldn't as to do so only allows you to make a mistake. But, I should give you the full info.

    1: Any 2001ish vintage bike has the curse of Bin Laden and the anniversary is coming...
    If you mess w that bike, the GOP will win and we'll* have WWIII before they're sworn in. Do you want to take responsibility for that? Do you?! Besides, bike will be incinerated making it (and everything ever) all a waste of time. *'Probably' IMO. Have to say that.
    2: More importantly, it is probably only 80mm travel. You will struggle to find a new 80mm fork these days. If you get longer, the bike might snap in half at the head-tube. Not least as (if it's Alu) it's at the end of its fatigue life anyway. If it's steel disregard that.
    Check fork is 1 1/8 steerer and not 1". If 1" Just forget it. (Should anyway).
    3: A longer fork will also raise the front end and pos ruin climbing ability.
    4: You could use an adjustable fork (Tora U-turn) that can be dialled down to 85mm. But that means extra cost.
    Toras can be found w V-brake....
    But it's not wise.
    5: Remember any fork needs to be cut. You have to remove old crown race and assuming it's not junk (meaning needing new race, or in a 2001 bike most likely a new headset), put it on new fork w steerer right length for new headset - which you have to install - having removed the old one, assuming it's neither rusted or cold welded in place. If you are unaware of headset work, it's the biggest PITA in home bike work without $$$ tools**. You need a new spring of the right weight for your good lady, unless she's about 155lb, or the fork is an air fork ($). To change the spring you need tools, and lubes. Or to pay someone.
    All these things cost. + Shipping.
    So you will never get this done for under $300. And the effect will be zero +ve and maybe quite a big -ve (reduced climbing ability, snapping frame in two with more stress on head welds due to changing head angle w raised front...)

    All this means. DON'T DO IT. Refer to original reply. I didn't inc link to that deal so you have a chance of finding it before someone else does. I linked, then took it out. If you can view my original reply, you'll get the link.

    Regards,
    EG.

    **You can do headset work w almost no tools, but it's a PITA and can be f'd up. Something you def don't want to do on an ancient bike without experience. Can of worms. For not much gain. I know, I've been there, done that. With experience, it's no prob. But if you had experience, you wouldn't need some random to spell it out.
    It is worth doing ONLY if you LOVE that bike. I have refurbed several beaters that I spent like $600 each to totally turn into new bikes (steel frames, rigid forks, rebuilding wheels and stuff). They end up worth what you paid. But you get nothing for your time and they are still just old fun bikes for riding around bike paths to save wear on the real rigs before the trails are in condition.
    Unless you LOVE that bike, it is time to ditch it.
    One obscure and unexpected +ve that could change your mind completely.
    If you salvage that bike. It will cost you. And it will still suck. BUT, you will learn many things. And in future, you may become a bike-master.*** Learning the hard way can be the best way to learn. But bikes take a lot of time and cash when you are doing them with value no longer being a primary consideration.
    And you will still learn from a new bike.
    ***I ain't there yet! I'll tell you this. It costs you at first, but in the long haul, you end up with the best perfect custom rigs for the min cost and as you built them you know every bolt and can do any work yourself. You end up UP! BIG. But, at first, it will bite you in the wallet. And could disappoint the Mrs when you spent what little cash and time on making old bikes like new, but not really any better, instead of her.

    No advice like this would be complete without a link to sheldonbrown.com . You want to know all about how to refurb an old bike. Go there. Go there anyway. Great when you start out. Soon you are up to speed and don't need it any more. But give the man the credit he deserves. RIP. And throw Harris a bone for looking after the site.
    Last edited by Ecogeek; 04-17-2011 at 11:16 PM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    A tora is not an upgrade over that fork. Besides feeling worse the tora is probably heavier.

    Save your money. If you strip and grease that fork it will work quite well for what it is. Keep it, ride it and don't consider any fork swap an upgrade unless it has a real damper in it (fox, tpc/absolute manitou or cartridge marzocchi).
    Owner of www.shockcraft.co.nz and NZ Manitou Agent.
    www.dougal.co.nz Suspension setup & tuning.
    SPV Devolve

  8. #8
    Trail Cubist
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    Great post Ecogeek—thanks! (And no—I don't wanna be responsible for any of those potential scenarios...LOL).

    Well here's the bike this POS fork is on right now: It's a 2000 Trek 6000. Here's the Bikepedia entry on it...

    http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/B...6000&Type=bike



    Even though it's old, it *seems* like a decent bike—I mean, it's light...and the derailleur works perfectly. It's got V-brakes, but no biggie—I adjusted them and they work fine. The frame is TIG-welded "alpha aluminum."

    As I might have said before, my wife is not a hard rider (she rarely does anything more than buff singletrack).

    So...unless anyone thinks this is actually a half-decent bike, I guess I'll just leave the forks alone.

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  9. #9
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    Is the bike in the picture really yours? It's very clean! If so, it's not a bad bike. If your wife likes it, is comfortable on it, and does easy riding a fork upgrade isn't unreasonable. The dart 2 would probably be okay, but take a look at other Manitou products - I'm not saying they the only forks to go to - but they have a fork trade up program. See if your LBS will do a manitou fork trade up for you, the way it works is they call manitou and tell them that you have an old fork, Manitou takes the fork back and sends out one dirt cheap. You have to pay shipping for both forks, and you have to trade for a similar fork, no xc fork for a dh. Manitou match as well as the minute expert are at 80mm and will accept rim brakes.

  10. #10
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    ^^^^+1^^^^^

    I just talk to manitou about my fork and the last email sent back was about the upgrade program. the tech stated it was 30-35% off msrp. and you have to go through your lbs.

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