Talas operation question?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Talas operation question?

    I've never had a Fox fork before, let alone an adjustable Talas so please excuse my ignorance if this is an obvious question.

    I'm interested in building a trail bike this Fall based around the 34 Talas 650b fork, I would like this bike to be dual purpose and I am looking into the Intense Carbine for the frame that has adjustable travel on the rear.

    I wondering it is is possible to run two different setups for the two different styles of riding that I do.

    1) During the week I ride a lot of "XC" type trails - though they are still fairly rocky where I live. I am considering running the Carbine with the rear travel set at 140mm and the Talas run at 120mm. This would steepen the geometry and I hope feel more "XC racy" on the flatter, smoother sections. I can then also easily flip the fork to 160mm when the conditions get steep and rockly.

    2) For the weekends, when I hit the mountains, adjust the rear to 152mm travel and run the fork in 160mm (drop to 120mm when the climb gets steep) given me "trail" travel that I need.

    My question on the Fox Talas is can the fork be run in 120mm mode with the full range of damping and spring rate or does it change its character when its travel is reduced and you would not want to run it this way except for climbing?

    I think I read somewhere that the reduced travel of the Talas locks down compression, firming up the fork, as it is designed only for climbing, but I can't find this now. So I am curious if my idea of a "dual-mode" bike will work?

    I'll have a budget of around $5k for my next bike build so I can't really affort to get two bikes - one more XC and one more trail/AM, so I'm looking for a good all rounder...

  2. #2
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    No one here has a Talas who can give me an informed opinion on how a Talas responds when it in in its reduced travel mode?

  3. #3
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    You will be fine with the Talas the ride characteristics are the same no matter which travel setting you are on.. I run mine on the lowest setting 90% of time and only crank it up for long downhills..
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
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  4. #4
    Biking Like Crazy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerryn View Post
    No one here has a Talas who can give me an informed opinion on how a Talas responds when it in in its reduced travel mode?
    Yeah, you'll be fine. I would check the oil levels on the fork right out of the box tho.
    Last 3 Fox forks , most recently a Fox 34 29er, were low, particularly
    on the Talas side.

  5. #5
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    Thank you. This is what I needed to know.

  6. #6
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    You will be fine - only thing you may do is alter your air pressure settings slightly to get the exact sag you want in each mode.

  7. #7
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    It doesn't sound like you need a Talas, it sound like you need two bikes.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    It doesn't sound like you need a Talas, it sound like you need two bikes.
    Now isn't that the truth!

    This has crossed my mind and in the past (15 years ago) I had a Ti hard-tail and (for then) a long travel full suspension bike. I was always in a dilemma as to which bike to take so in the end I sold both and bought my current steed.

    If I went with two bikes, for my budget, while they could still be nice bikes I will still feel that I made a compromise in both bikes and I will still have the dilemma as to which bike to ride....

    I'd rather focus my efforts on getting the single best all rounder I can afford and then know that I didn't make any compromises in the spec. But that's me.....

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerryn View Post
    If I went with two bikes, for my budget, while they could still be nice bikes I will still feel that I made a compromise in both bikes and I will still have the dilemma as to which bike to ride....

    I'd rather focus my efforts on getting the single best all rounder I can afford and then know that I didn't make any compromises in the spec. But that's me.....
    I didn't actually post that to start a discussion, but...

    In my opinion you'll make more compromises trying to have one bike do two jobs, than having two cheaper bikes for two separate jobs. Not to mention, if you're careful, you can build up two really nice bikes for a total of $5k.

    It also seems the dilemma of which one to take is pretty easily sorted by which trails you'll be hitting. AM? Take the long travel full suspension. XC? Take the other one.

  10. #10
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    That is still under consideration. You know, first world problems eh?


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