New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Looks great in this detailed article
    New Cane Creek Double Barrel Inline Shock Brings Twin Tube Tech to Trail Bikes Everywhere!

    Interesting up crotch video

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    Yup! It looks sweet! Only thing missing from the article is WHEN I can get one for my trail bike.

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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Outside of finding this new shock very interesting, I'm wondering if they will now make a remote option for the climb switch. Many manufacturers make remote switches for their non-piggyback shocks. If CC made a remote for the climb switch on this shock, I would bet it would fit the double barrel air CS as well. I live in the Midwest where we have lots of rolling hills. I would love to turn on my climb switch every time the trail points up. It is a big help. Reaching down into a small confined space every time I want to use it is a pain in the ass. Really hoping a remote is on the list of things to do for cane creek. Oh, and this new inline double barrel definitely looks sweet.

  4. #4
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    already available for sale on cane creek's website. I'm sure it will be online shops pretty quickly.
    fill what's empty, empty what's full, and scratch where it itches.

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    This really changes things. I spent forever looking for a shorter travel frame I could fit a CCDBAcs on.

    This really open up the choices for someone like me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    This really changes things. I spent forever looking for a shorter travel frame I could fit a CCDBAcs on.
    Same here. In my case I wanted a shock with a full range of adjustments for rebound, compression, and all the other settings, which limits me to the CCDBA and other remote reservoir shocks. None of them fit in the frames I'm interested in without having half the dials blocked off, that is, if they fit in the first place. This makes things much easier for me.

  7. #7
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    Just heard July from Cane Creek for retail. First they have to fill the OEM orders.

  8. #8
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    Wonder who will be specing this shock OEM. Should be interesting to see who has faith in their end user's ability to tune their own suspension.

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    So when are we going to see a bladder or diaphragm in place of the IFP on the CCDB coil and air?

    I have to wonder if the CCDB inline has better performance than the air, because of the diaphragm, even with less oil volume. Very interesting shock.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikerbob.com View Post
    Looks great in this detailed article
    New Cane Creek Double Barrel Inline Shock Brings Twin Tube Tech to Trail Bikes Everywhere!

    Interesting up crotch video
    Bob!!! Good to hear from you!

    Yup, this one looks awesome. I wonder why they just didn't use a floating IFP like in the Romic, but the architecture must be different enough not to do it that way.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp View Post
    Bob!!! Good to hear from you!

    Yup, this one looks awesome. I wonder why they just didn't use a floating IFP like in the Romic, but the architecture must be different enough not to do it that way.
    No space for IFP.

  12. #12
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    I've ordered one for my Santa Cruz Bronson C, looking forward to getting some ride time in when it turns up!
    Not really doing much Ridin' or Diggin' :skep:

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlennW View Post
    I've ordered one for my Santa Cruz Bronson C, looking forward to getting some ride time in when it turns up!
    For the Bronson I recommend the Double Barrel Air CS Bronson-specific, call Cane Creek and they'll let you know they have a special shock for that bike.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacubaya View Post
    No space for IFP.
    Thanks, Tacu!
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacubaya View Post
    For the Bronson I recommend the Double Barrel Air CS Bronson-specific, call Cane Creek and they'll let you know they have a special shock for that bike.
    Can you say more?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacubaya View Post
    For the Bronson I recommend the Double Barrel Air CS Bronson-specific, call Cane Creek and they'll let you know they have a special shock for that bike.
    You have more info on that? I've followed the threads on the DB Air CS and it's seems like people have mixed views on how well it works on the Bronson. What's the 'special' element involved?
    Not really doing much Ridin' or Diggin' :skep:

  17. #17
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    Wow! Every time I turn around lately, I have to spend more money on my bike

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillharman View Post
    Can you say more?
    Not until June.

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    Well I sent Cane Creek a message about this Bronson specific shock and they've just directed me towards their shock fitter so looks like they're keeping pretty schtum!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laterilus View Post
    Outside of finding this new shock very interesting, I'm wondering if they will now make a remote option for the climb switch.
    According to an article on VitalMTB - "It may also be hard to reach the Climb Switch on some frames. To address this, and to improve on-the-fly accessibility for all, Cane Creek will offer a bar-mounted CS remote later this year"
    So I think they have you covered there.

    I'd love this shock on my Mt Vision, but I'm still not sure whether it has enough clearance around the lower shock mount to fit the shock. I don't trust the fit thing on their website either, as when I put my bikes details in, it says that the DB coil with piggy back will fit, and it definately won't (you can't get any piggyback shock in there). I may have to flick them an email.
    I don't crash, I just have slightly uncontrolled dismounts!

  21. #21
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    If you have space for the Debonair or CCDBA, why run the Inline vs the other two?
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHeller View Post
    If you have space for the Debonair or CCDBA, why run the Inline vs the other two?
    Same performance at a lower price and weight?

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    Too bad they dont make it for Giant Trance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PHeller View Post
    If you have space for the Debonair or CCDBA, why run the Inline vs the other two?
    Depends on your riding. I called them directly and spoke with them.

    My Lunchbox fits the piggy back. That said, 95% of my riding is local MD XC trails with 5-6 trips a year to east coast bike parks, so the runs aren't as long as out west.

    My understanding is the extra oil volume in the PB shocks combats heat on long downhill runs. Since I won't be encountering that, I decided to save some money, weight and get the same performance** for my riding.

    basically if you have those long ass downhill runs that last 10 or more minutes and you can fit a PB shock- use it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamao View Post
    Too bad they dont make it for Giant Trance.
    The Fit Finder thingy has been changing over the last couple days. First time I checked it said the Trance X shock was 7.5"x2" with no fit and now it's saying 6.5"x1.5". Maybe they just haven't got around to it yet?

    Fingers crossed, it'd be nice to have an aftermarket option other than the Monarch.

  26. #26
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    This shock is good news for those that haven't the room (or travel) for a piggy back, but its far less "amazing" than what MTBR would have you believe. Looking at their "infomercial" dressed up as a "gear review", this pic made me laugh with its lame-o traditional / inline comparison



    Not so amazing now:


  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    This shock is good news for those that haven't the room (or travel) for a piggy back, but its far less "amazing" than what MTBR would have you believe. Looking at their "infomercial" dressed up as a "gear review", this pic made me laugh with its lame-o traditional / inline comparison



    Not so amazing now:
    While I agree that it may not be the best thing since sliced bread (remains to be seen), do you imply they are the same design?

    Not that the twin tube has not been made before (Romic used a twin tube since 2002?) but they are not the same thing.

    Yeah, all shocks are basically the same... piston, oil, space for oil displaced, separating membrane/IFP, gas. But implementation varies and so does performance.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golf_Chick View Post
    Well I sent Cane Creek a message about this Bronson specific shock and they've just directed me towards their shock fitter so looks like they're keeping pretty schtum!
    It will be released next month, and I would recommend giving them a call by then.

  29. #29
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    I'm just pointing out that the MTBR light-beer informercial on the product has an image specifically calculated to make it look significantly different to the "traditional" design, but when you flip the image it is far more similar than the spin meisters would like you to believe. The twin tube is the key different not the shock orientation (or even the lack of an IFP). Also, Magura made a range of non-piggy back shocks that used a twin tube approach years ago, so the claimed "first of its kind" is also a bit of stretch. eg Magura Hugin rear shocks.

    I just grow tired at reading these so-called reviews that are really just a republication of a manufacturer's press release.

    I do like the shock though and the possibility of a 6.5 x 1.5 option would be excellent.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    I'm just pointing out that the MTBR light-beer informercial on the product has an image specifically calculated to make it look significantly different to the "traditional" design, but when you flip the image it is far more similar than the spin meisters would like you to believe. The twin tube is the key different not the shock orientation (or even the lack of an IFP). Also, Magura made a range of non-piggy back shocks that used a twin tube approach years ago, so the claimed "first of its kind" is also a bit of stretch. eg Magura Hugin rear shocks.

    I just grow tired at reading these so-called reviews that are really just a republication of a manufacturer's press release.

    I do like the shock though and the possibility of a 6.5 x 1.5 option would be excellent.
    So, the Magura shock had separate high, low speed compression and rebound adjusters, and a climbing switch that didn't affect each other when adjusted?

  31. #31
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    So you guys who are ready to open your wallets and pre-order this shock; are you so willing despite any realworld rider reviews? No one knows jack-sheit about this shock. It could be a total P.O.S as far as anyone knows.
    Send me your money instead. You may get the same level of satisfaction.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    So you guys who are ready to open your wallets and pre-order this shock; are you so willing despite any realworld rider reviews? No one knows jack-sheit about this shock. It could be a total P.O.S as far as anyone knows.
    Send me your money instead. You may get the same level of satisfaction.
    CC doesn't make garbage.

  33. #33
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    Based on the other DB shocks, I am not worried in the slightest about ordering one without pouring over reviews. I have a broken RP23 and I need to think if I want to get it rebuilt now for $150 (or more to Push it) or save up the scratch for this. Decisions...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    So, the Magura shock had separate high, low speed compression and rebound adjusters, and a climbing switch that didn't affect each other when adjusted?
    What's your point? Show me one thing in the "Review" that is actually reviewing anything and not just a cut and paste job from some CC promo material.

    As an aside, Magura shock does have separate HSC, LSC and rebound adjusters. No HSR or climbing switch, but it was definitely a "twin tube" design where damping oil flow is primarily related to shaft displacement and not piston valving.

    To repeat once again, I'm not bagging the shock. I think its great to see another option in short travel. BUT I am down on the whole "Gear Review" that's not actually a review.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    What's your point? Show me one thing in the "Review" that is actually reviewing anything and not just a cut and paste job from some CC promo material.

    As an aside, Magura shock does have separate HSC, LSC and rebound adjusters. No HSR or climbing switch, but it was definitely a "twin tube" design where damping oil flow is primarily related to shaft displacement and not piston valving.

    To repeat once again, I'm not bagging the shock. I think its great to see another option in short travel. BUT I am down on the whole "Gear Review" that's not actually a review.
    Thanks for clearing that up. It just proves that the new CC shock is a first of its kind. They don't have a shock to test yet. So, they posted what information they did have. Because of that, you and a lot of other people know about this shock. Which allows me and a lot of other people to start making plans to buy one. It's really something people should not be complaining about. But, you know some people just have to complain no matter what.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    CC doesn't make garbage.
    What I am getting at is people are willing to purchase this shock based solely on cane creeks' reputation, and not based on any real world reviews. IMO, that is not a smart way to spend your hard earned dollars.
    But it's your money, go ahead and be foolish.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    What I am getting at is people are willing to purchase this shock based solely on cane creeks' reputation, and not based on any real world reviews. IMO, that is not a smart way to spend your hard earned dollars.
    But it's your money, go ahead and be foolish.
    It is a repackaged CCDBA-CS that is known to be one of the best mass marketed shocks out there, with the same damper. Is it really risky to assume the inline version is going to perform as well as the existing CC shocks? I do not think so. The biggest unknown is the new bladder design and its long term reliability. Here's where the CC reputation makes people believe they got it right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    What I am getting at is people are willing to purchase this shock based solely on cane creeks' reputation, and not based on any real world reviews. IMO, that is not a smart way to spend your hard earned dollars.
    But it's your money, go ahead and be foolish.
    The Fox Float CTD is the most commonly specced and reviewed shock, and it's terrible. I trust my experience with the CCDBA-CS more than I trust someone I don't know. Half of the professional reviews that have come out have borderline silly statements in them.

  39. #39
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    I imagine that the large number of manufacturers that are specing the new Inline on their frames right now are basing it on something beside reputation
    Specialized, Norco, Intense, et al.

  40. #40
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    This was enough of a review to convince me, when coupled with the reputation of Cane Creek's other shocks:

    Cane Creek's New DBinline Shock - First Ride - Pinkbike

  41. #41
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    Already have my order in.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillharman View Post
    The Fox Float CTD is the most commonly specced and reviewed shock, and it's terrible. I trust my experience with the CCDBA-CS more than I trust someone I don't know. Half of the professional reviews that have come out have borderline silly statements in them.
    I did not mean professional reviews, I mean reviews from everyday people, you and me, not anyone working in the industry.
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikerbob.com View Post
    I imagine that the large number of manufacturers that are specing the new Inline on their frames right now are basing it on something beside reputation
    Specialized, Norco, Intense, et al.
    The float CTD is probably the most commonly spec'ed shock out there, and many people think it's a POS. Do those frame manufacturers know something we don't?
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    What I am getting at is people are willing to purchase this shock based solely on cane creeks' reputation, and not based on any real world reviews. IMO, that is not a smart way to spend your hard earned dollars.
    But it's your money, go ahead and be foolish.
    This has to be one of the most ridiculous statements I have read in a while. Almost everyone I know consumes goods based on reputation of the brand. From cars, to components, to tools, to electronics, to bikes, to condoms.

    If the brand has proven its quality in the past, generally they will spend money on R&D to create more products to get more market share.

    Yes, this is a new product, but it is using a lot of proven technology, just repackaged. I am sure that the early adopters will be fine with shelling out $500 for this thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    This has to be one of the most ridiculous statements I have read in a while. Almost everyone I know consumes goods based on reputation of the brand. From cars, to components, to tools, to electronics, to bikes, to condoms.

    If the brand has proven its quality in the past, generally they will spend money on R&D to create more products to get more market share.

    Yes, this is a new product, but it is using a lot of proven technology, just repackaged. I am sure that the early adopters will be fine with shelling out $500 for this thing.
    I don't think it's ridiculous at all. For example, would you assume every new model of automobile from a single manufacturer is of the same good quality as the vehicle you purchased from them last year? Car manufacturers test their new vehicles for some amount of time before releasing them, yet after these models get in the hands of the consumer, sometimes that is when you start seeing the problems after enough time has passed. Why would it be any different with anything else you purchase, say, a new model rear shock?
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  46. #46
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    No offense renegade, but if we all took your advice there would be no user reviews out there. You should be applauding these people jumping in and spending their money on something so that we can get some feedback from real users, not paid advertisements.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    For example, would you assume every new model of automobile from a single manufacturer is of the same good quality as the vehicle you purchased from them last year?
    I would say(as would most sociologists) that is how the majority of people with liquid assets work. The entire car industry is built using this model.
    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Car manufacturers test their new vehicles for some amount of time before releasing them, yet after these models get in the hands of the consumer, sometimes that is when you start seeing the problems after enough time has passed. Why would it be any different with anything else you purchase, say, a new model rear shock?
    That is why they offer warranties, and generally use some existing technology/parts to keep % of failure down.

    Also, $500 is a much better risk/reward ratio, than say people buying even a low end new car like the BRZ.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by honns View Post
    No offense renegade, but if we all took your advice there would be no user reviews out there. You should be applauding these people jumping in and spending their money on something so that we can get some feedback from real users, not paid advertisements.
    No offense taken. Yes, someone has to jump in and try the product. And I realize that manufacturers do really on brand loyalty to make a living, and sustain a bussiness.I have been burned enough times across many product lines that I try not to purchase by brand loyalty if I can afford to wait.
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    No offense taken. Yes, someone has to jump in and try the product. And I realize that manufacturers do really on brand loyalty to make a living, and sustain a bussiness.I have been burned enough times across many product lines that I try not to purchase by brand loyalty if I can afford to wait.
    I think you have to keep in mind we are talking about a very specific company, Cane Creek, which makes a very limited set of products, and up to this point, only a single suspension product (family) which is nearly universally regarded to be excellent if not the best in it's class. It's adding a new product to that family which uses very similar technology packaged in a different form factor. I don't think it's a huge leap to believe it's going to be a good product. There are likely to be bugs in the first version, but Cane Creek also has an excellent reputation for service.

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    Hillharman, I realize that my comparing CC to an auto manufacturer is not at all an apples to apples comparison.The difference in this shock from CC is the bladder; this is new for them. Time will tell if they nailed it
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  51. #51
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    Mtbr's Angry Singlespeeder flew out there to check it out.

    Gear Review: Cane Creek DBinline Air Shock | Mountain Bike Review

    We should get a production model in June and we'll put it in a Ripley.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    I'm just pointing out that the MTBR light-beer informercial on the product has an image specifically calculated to make it look significantly different to the "traditional" design, but when you flip the image it is far more similar than the spin meisters would like you to believe. The twin tube is the key different not the shock orientation (or even the lack of an IFP). Also, Magura made a range of non-piggy back shocks that used a twin tube approach years ago, so the claimed "first of its kind" is also a bit of stretch. eg Magura Hugin rear shocks.

    I just grow tired at reading these so-called reviews that are really just a republication of a manufacturer's press release.

    I do like the shock though and the possibility of a 6.5 x 1.5 option would be excellent.
    While I'm not a fan of so-called "reviews" that do nothing more than parroting the marketing copy from the manufacturer I think the reason for orienting the shock as they did was due to the way it will be mounted (the damping controls on the DB inline are on the opposite end from where they'd be on a "normal" air shock. Also, the oil flow through the shock is clearly different.

  53. #53
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    Nothing like sending a single-speed hardtail rider out to review the nuances of a highly engineered rear shock that could be a new option for those that like to tinker move beyond the 3 position pre-sets of the day. Sounds like the Angry SS didn't stray from the base tune at all. Hmmm .

  54. #54
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    I REALLY want to like this new product and it's possible tuning efforts. I think it's a big step in the right direction for tuning. I have my hesitations though.

    I'm wondering how much of Ohlins technology/quality has been left behind with Cane Creek? They co-developed (and mfg?) the original CCDB coil to much success, but I'm wondering if they are still involved? Having the Ohlins-name to back up this new shock would be very impressive.

    I'm also thinking back to the Progressive 5th Element shock, and it's initial release. They couldn't make them fast enough, with massive amounts of positive praise and press. Their innovative damping circuit was the end-all be-all, and was OEM on most of the bikes at that time. Ultimately, they had a VERY high failure rate, massive amounts of warranty returns, thus pulling them out of the MTB market in under 3 years. However, other shock mfg's are using the damping characteristics of the 5th Element with more success & reliability now.

    I wonder what we will think of this release in 3 to 5 years.
    I get paid to ride shotgun.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Octane View Post
    I wonder what we will think of this release in 3 to 5 years.
    As I said earlier, time will tell. Right now, all we have is speculation. I have forgotten the count; so many new suspension releases, both fork and shock, were heralded as to be so revolutionary that they were revered like they were the second coming of Christ. The first fox 36 fork. The fox dhx-air. The progressive 5th element shock. The early CCDB coil (before they opened up the high speed circuits). The Roco air shocks. Etc.

    Time will tell.
    ****

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Mtbr's Angry Singlespeeder flew out there to check it out.

    Gear Review: Cane Creek DBinline Air Shock | Mountain Bike Review

    We should get a production model in June and we'll put it in a Ripley.
    Francois congrats on your 18,000 post! big ups to MTBR

    On a side note, this shock may be in the cards next year (hopefully after I get a raise!). I'm no weight weenie so a 3 ounce jump from my fox float ctd doesn't seem like a bad trade off if it lives up to the hype on the descents.

    I'm stoked at where they're trying to go with this type of shock. Hopefully it breeds some healthy competition... right now it fulfills a niche that fox and rock shox hasn't really touched yet.

  57. #57
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    Will this new shock work with rwc needle bearings?

  58. #58
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    ...and that's why I don't really read the MTBR site reviews...

    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    This was enough of a review to convince me, when coupled with the reputation of Cane Creek's other shocks:

    Cane Creek's New DBinline Shock - First Ride - Pinkbike
    Yes, that was a good overview of the shock. I have to agree with the earlier post about the utter uselessness of the MTBR reviews and overall content on the site. It's basically a PR/clickbait site for the manufacturers. The forums are filled with folks who care and have useful info to share, but the "gear reviews" have grown so tiresome. Reminds me of Mountain Bike Action at it's worst.

    As for the Inline shock... Sure, it looks good. Can CC make crap? Sure, the stuff they farm out is not nearly same quality as the stuff they make in-house. Look at the 40 headset vs the 110.
    - -benja- -

  59. #59
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    So I know the black/green bike in the Disruptor video is a Ripley, but what kind of bike was the sexy all matte black beauty???

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhillipJ View Post
    The Fit Finder thingy has been changing over the last couple days. First time I checked it said the Trance X shock was 7.5"x2" with no fit and now it's saying 6.5"x1.5". Maybe they just haven't got around to it yet?

    Fingers crossed, it'd be nice to have an aftermarket option other than the Monarch.
    Well, looks like that the Trance 27.5 isnt available anymore on their fit finder.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by benja55 View Post
    Yes, that was a good overview of the shock. I have to agree with the earlier post about the utter uselessness of the MTBR reviews and overall content on the site. It's basically a PR/clickbait site for the manufacturers. The forums are filled with folks who care and have useful info to share, but the "gear reviews" have grown so tiresome. Reminds me of Mountain Bike Action at it's worst.
    Yep, vague reviews that don't go specifically into why they are better than product x, y and z are useless. Unless they are talking about the specific damping traits compared against some worse and possibly better products, it's impossible to gain any useful information. Compare against CCDB or avy-woodie and DHX-air and then make comments about how it's high and low speed damping circuits work, how it sucks up sharp edged bumps compared to these, how it works in repetitive high speed chatter like these, how the mid-stroke support is comparatively or resistance to g-out forces, etc. Unless we have some baselines to compare against, it's usually useless information...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by rondre3000 View Post
    So I know the black/green bike in the Disruptor video is a Ripley, but what kind of bike was the sexy all matte black beauty???
    Its a Canyon Spectral AL:
    For demanding all mountain challenges I Canyon Spectral AL

  63. #63
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    I have one on order as well, mid July to early Aug is eta.

    I will put it thru its paces I assure you. I am about 240lbs kitted up. It's going on my single pivot Shova ST. I ride east coast so no super long descents, but it's nasty down here so it will be tested on muddy root laced rocky terrain with by big arse sitting on it I'm no pro reviewer, but I can hack w the best of them. I'll take it up to Windrock a few times as well to really work it.

  64. #64
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    Where did you order? It seems it cant be ordered on the canecreek website.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamao View Post
    Well, looks like that the Trance 27.5 isnt available anymore on their fit finder.
    I just looked again, and the Trance 27.5 is listed on the fit list, under Trance (all 27.5 models).

    This is what I hope I will get for my Trance SX.

  66. #66
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    you have to call CC direct. 1-800-234-2725 i talked to Gary.

  67. #67
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by tacubaya View Post
    Not until June.
    It's nearly July...word?
    Never underestimate an old man with a mountain bike.

  68. #68
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    No word as of yet...

  69. #69
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    Finally its hitting the store's. I've just order done for my Santa Cruz Solo/5010 C. Cannot wait to get my hands on it!

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Finally its hitting the store's. I've just order done for my Santa Cruz Solo/5010 C. Cannot wait to get my hands on it!
    I'm very interested to hear your impressions, as I'm sure most others are as well. Keep us updated. Enjoy the new bike!

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronJobe View Post
    Will this new shock work with rwc needle bearings?
    Sorry for the late reply, but the answer is yes! CC went with 15mm shock eyelets on the Inline (measured with bushings out).

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by whoodie View Post
    I'm very interested to hear your impressions, as I'm sure most others are as well. Keep us updated. Enjoy the new bike!
    Going to be the 10th of August until I get my hands on it as I have ordered it from the USA and I have to collect it. If its anything like my DBA CS on my Nomad it will be incredible! That is the best shock I have ever had my hands on.

  73. #73
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    Anyone know of anywhere to preorder online with international delivery?

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    Anyone know of anywhere to preorder online with international delivery?
    Try Bikerbob, best prices I've found. Shoot him an email [email protected]
    Ripley LS v3
    OG Ripley v2 handed down to son

  75. #75
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    I just picked up a few things from Biker Bob as well and can't recommend him enough. Good guy, screamin' prices.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Try Bikerbob, best prices I've found. Shoot him an email [email protected]
    Thanks for the heads up, great price! I'm preordered now

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by OriginalDonk View Post
    I just picked up a few things from Biker Bob as well and can't recommend him enough. Good guy, screamin' prices.
    Quote Originally Posted by whoodie View Post
    Thanks for the heads up, great price! I'm preordered now
    After my first order with him and the amazing price on my CCDBAcs, I pretty much just email him first when I need something.
    Gave me a hell of a steal on my Fox 36.

    One time I needed something right away and he was honest enough to say his supplier didn't have it in and sent me links to two sites that had it in stock at a decent price, though not as good as his.
    Ripley LS v3
    OG Ripley v2 handed down to son

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Going to be the 10th of August until I get my hands on it as I have ordered it from the USA and I have to collect it. If its anything like my DBA CS on my Nomad it will be incredible! That is the best shock I have ever had my hands on.
    Slightly curious what the weight of that size will be…CC only lists weight for smallest shock…and what it looks like on your new new bike. Considering replacing the CDTK on my Solo with either the Inline or RS Monarch RT3 Debonair.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattMay View Post
    Slightly curious what the weight of that size will be…CC only lists weight for smallest shock…and what it looks like on your new new bike. Considering replacing the CDTK on my Solo with either the Inline or RS Monarch RT3 Debonair.
    Having experience of a Debonair on my Nomad v a CC DBA CS I'd not bother buying a Debonair outright with my own cash, never got on with it.id rather have had a Float X as IMHO it's a nicer shock.

  80. #80
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    What about the float x vs ccdba?

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    What about the float x vs ccdba?
    Float X is IMHO a lovely shock. I really liked mine but the DBA has the ability to be tuned to my exact tune myself, the Float X I had Push tuned. The Float X is great though, I'd have mine on my Solo in a flash but it's not the right sort of bike for a piggyback shock.

  82. #82
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    Anyone got any update/news is the inline out in the market?

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigerkai View Post
    Anyone got any update/news is the inline out in the market?
    Universal Cycles has them in stock and what seems to be one of the best prices around $432. Ordered mine yesterday, it was shipped yesterday and is on route.

    I am really hoping it works as well as the hype around it.

  84. #84
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    Re: New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by rideitall View Post
    Universal Cycles has them in stock and what seems to be one of the best prices around $432. Ordered mine yesterday, it was shipped yesterday and is on route.

    I am really hoping it works as well as the hype around it.
    Let us know after the first ride, lots of us are anxiously awaiting to hear real user reviews. What frame are you putting it on?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideitall View Post
    Universal Cycles has them in stock and what seems to be one of the best prices around $432. Ordered mine yesterday, it was shipped yesterday and is on route.

    I am really hoping it works as well as the hype around it.
    Thanks for the tip off, great rate on fast international shipping too. Order placed!

  86. #86
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    My shock has landed, just need to get to New York to collect it LOL.

  87. #87
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    NB-that price is without mounts. I get mine direct from the factory and the mounts are properly pressed in by Cane Creek for the specific frame we are doing. Avoids mistakes and trouble. Just bolt on and ride!

  88. #88
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    Picked up my Inline and it's "significant other" from the LBS yesterday.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-suspension.jpg  


  89. #89
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    Can you get it on some scales and weigh it??

  90. #90
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Can you PLEASE get it on some scales and weigh it??
    There. I fixed it for you. And since you asked nicely, I will when I grab the scale from work tomorrow. This is the 200x50 size if it matters.

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by BXCc View Post
    This is the 200x50 size if it matters.
    Exactly the same size of shock I have waiting for me :-)

  92. #92
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Not the lightest but here you go. New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-imageuploadedbytapatalk1406808632.917850.jpg

  93. #93
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    ^^^ same as my Monarch Plus in the same size, for reference.

  94. #94
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by hardboiled View Post
    ^^^ same as my Monarch Plus in the same size, for reference.
    Same weight, same price (retail anyway). Wonder if one will be significantly better than the other?

  95. #95
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by BXCc View Post
    Not the lightest but here you go. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ImageUploadedByTapatalk1406808632.917850.jpg 
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    Awesome, thanks!

    Btw first ride review just in over on "Santa Cruz Bronson and Cane Creek DB Air-Perfect Pair" thread.

    Frorider gave it a B+ but still tweaking settings.
    Last edited by MattMay; 07-31-2014 at 02:10 PM.
    Never underestimate an old man with a mountain bike.

  96. #96
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    Okay, it's been several days now; where are your reviews?
    ****

  97. #97
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    He's having to much fun riding!

  98. #98
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Okay, it's been several days now; where are your reviews?
    I just finished putting the bike together last night. Today is the maiden voyage. But my review may not be worth much. I'm new to the whole "fully adjustable" suspension thing.

  99. #99
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    mine arrives tomorrow so will also be testing it out in the next few days and will feedback.

  100. #100
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Got a small ride in this afternoon. Set the sag and off I went with the factory base tune of 2, 7, 2, 10. It was a little too soft for my liking so I upped the LSC by 2 clicks to 9. The ride was a bit stiffer while keeping the same sag. Really happy so far. And because no one buys the magazine for the articles, here are some cheesy glamour shot pictures.New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-imageuploadedbytapatalk1407279514.775510.jpgNew inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-imageuploadedbytapatalk1407279534.291808.jpg
    Last edited by BXCc; 08-06-2014 at 03:11 AM.

  101. #101
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    Interestingly CC recommends 17mm of sag for 2014 Solos and 14mm of sag for 2013 ones! I think someone has hit the wrong key there and they mean 14mm for both.

  102. #102
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    Base tune for the Trance 27.5 has gone up on Cane Creek's site, also 14mm sag, come on USPS!

  103. #103
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    Those of you who have received your shock, did you get volume spacers in the box?

  104. #104
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by whoodie View Post
    Those of you who have received your shock, did you get volume spacers in the box?
    Yes. It is a blue strip that has little squares so you can cut off what is needed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Draper View Post
    Interestingly CC recommends 17mm of sag for 2014 Solos and 14mm of sag for 2013 ones! I think someone has hit the wrong key there and they mean 14mm for both.
    17 is for the Bronson so yes, it's not correct. 12 to 15 mm is what SC recommends for the Solo.

  105. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    Base tune for the Trance 27.5 has gone up on Cane Creek's site, also 14mm sag, come on USPS!
    I had noticed that, basically the same tune as on the Reign, but with only 14mm sag rather than 15mm.

    I pick up my shock tonight from the post office. Will likely have to wait until tomorrow to get out for a ride. Super stoked to try it out.

  106. #106
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    Picked up the DBinline tonight and installed. To get approx. 15mm sag I had to run 195psi. The setup guide advised as a starting point of body weight (190lbs) - 20 for starting air pressure. Left the stock/base tune as it was.

    FWIW the back alley bounce test felt pretty good. Perhaps a little too quick on the rebound, but not certain if that is HSR or LSR that would be required to be increased to slow down the parking lot bounce rebound.

  107. #107
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    Lsr

    Quote Originally Posted by rideitall View Post
    picked up the dbinline tonight and installed. To get approx. 15mm sag i had to run 195psi. The setup guide advised as a starting point of body weight (190lbs) - 20 for starting air pressure. Left the stock/base tune as it was.

    Fwiw the back alley bounce test felt pretty good. Perhaps a little too quick on the rebound, but not certain if that is hsr or lsr that would be required to be increased to slow down the parking lot bounce rebound.

  108. #108
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    I had originally thought LSR as well, but after reading the field manual it implies that it is more in keeping with the LSC in controlling rider input (ie dive on a fork from braking) as compared to reacting to a landing. From what I can understand it is the speed of which the shaft is moving and not the speed of the bike. Either way I will try out one change at a time until I can isolate it and adjust it to my liking. Thanks

  109. #109
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    If its rebounding too fast in a parking lot bounce test, it's LSR. You wont be able to compress it fast enough for HSR to come into play.

    Quote Originally Posted by rideitall View Post
    I had originally thought LSR as well, but after reading the field manual it implies that it is more in keeping with the LSC in controlling rider input (ie dive on a fork from braking) as compared to reacting to a landing. From what I can understand it is the speed of which the shaft is moving and not the speed of the bike. Either way I will try out one change at a time until I can isolate it and adjust it to my liking. Thanks

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    If its rebounding too fast in a parking lot bounce test, it's LSR. You wont be able to compress it fast enough for HSR to come into play.
    HSR is dependent on the shaft velocity during extension, not compression. In the parking lot if you bounce the bike around and you use plenty of travel, then HSR is coming into play.

  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacubaya View Post
    HSR is dependent on the shaft velocity during extension, not compression. In the parking lot if you bounce the bike around and you use plenty of travel, then HSR is coming into play.
    Agreed. - Caution long post below ...

    Just back from first ride. This shock is good. Started at about 190psi and the base tune
    HSC - 2 turns
    LSC - 7 clicks
    HSR - 2 turns
    LSR - 10 clicks

    I did add a little LSR, couldn't feel the clicks but added 1/2 turn. Was feeling a little too much pop for coming out of compression. From there I still felt the back was still a little soft and used the CS made if firmer but still a little off.

    Added air pressure up to 200 psi, still likely getting a like 15mm - 18mm sag, but felt pretty firm. Rode for a while and felt like too much damping. Dropped LSC 1/4 turn (1 3/4 total) and dropped LSR 3/4 turn (or also 1 3/4). Added a little better than 1/2 turn HSR again, hard to feel the clicks.

    This felt pretty dialed. Tried partially engaging the CS during technical climbs and short descents and for the most part left it open. The shock seemed to nicely sit in its travel. The o-ring got to within about 3/8" from the end, but the ride didn't have any real drops or harsh compressions, so I think I am pretty close.

    Will have to double check dial position when I get some time, but for a first attempt at setting this thing up I am quite happy in the performance and the extra traction this provided over the Float CTD Evo. Conditions were dry and a fair bit of loose dusty conditions so the impact of the shock was noticeable in keeping the rear tire in contact with the ground, but still have a good amount of pop and didn't feel sluggish.

    The really good news, at least for my wallet, is that without having to worry about the back of the bike, the performance of my Factory Talas 34 was not terrible. I am going to keep it around a while longer as I fine tune the DBinline.

  112. #112
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    I picked up my Inline from Universal Cycles as well. Went on my Banshee Spitfire V2. Two rides on the factory tune @ 170psi. so far I really like it. The whole bike is brand new so still trying to get comfortable with the bike. Probably going to keep the tune where it's at for right now.


  113. #113
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    My Cane Creek 'DBinline' arrived today and only just installed to my Specialized Enduro Expert 29" M 2014. Now I have to wait for the weekend and test it out.

    The shock was packaged well and installation was no big issue as everything fitted ok. Have not adjust any settings as yet, they are preset for Specialized Enduro. The tuning field guide supplied is thorough, only 24 pages.

    CC recommend charging 20Psi less your weight (kitted up) and I got 20mm slag, the supplied preset card recommends 17mm. The shock was precharged to 100Psi.

    Here some photo's
    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-august-2014-025-50pc.jpg

    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-august-2014-028-50pc.jpg

    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-august-2014-042-50pc.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-august-2014-045-50pc.jpg  

    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-august-2014-057-50pc.jpg  


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    Just got my inline, I cannot wait to get it on my solo and try it out. If it's anything like my DBA CS then it's going to be amazing.

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    I plan on getting the inline for my stumpy. However I might wait since winter is just around the corner in my nick of the woods. I would like to hear some detailed reviews in comparison to fox.

  116. #116
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    Okay, so it's about a week later since I last asked; where are the reviews? I thought hundreds of folks were waiting in line with pre-orders waiting to get this shock? Perhaps some of you are:
    Waiting to get your shock?
    Waiting untill you get 100 hours of riding time before posting your comprehensive review?
    Still tweaking all your adjustments because you still have not found settings that satisfy you?
    Or?
    Speak up please!
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  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Okay, so it's about a week later since I last asked; where are the reviews? I thought hundreds of folks were waiting in line with pre-orders waiting to get this shock? Perhaps some of you are:
    Waiting to get your shock?
    Waiting untill you get 100 hours of riding time before posting your comprehensive review?
    Still tweaking all your adjustments because you still have not found settings that satisfy you?
    Or?
    Speak up please!
    I should have mine tomorrow, planning on getting it mounted up and heading to the trails right after work. I've already got a loop planned out for riding/tuning the shock. Here are my details:

    2013 SC Tallboy LTc
    Fox Float CTDk w/ TA

    My biggest gripe with the Float is lack of low speed compression, I can feel the rear sus of the bike moving when I don't think it should be. I'm really looking forward to being able to dial in the shock how I expect it to feel. I'm crossing my fingers that the Inline will perform beyond my expectations.

  118. #118
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    Got mine this morning, should have it installed this week for a ride on Saturday.

    I'll just ride it with the factory tune to start with. Once I'm the only one left riding, I might do some repeat tuning runs.

  119. #119
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    I did post a review up on mine at least for the one ride I got in before heading out for vacation. My trail bike is not with me so I won't get any more rides in until back home.

    The one ride was very positive.

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Or?
    Having to much fun riding a new shock?

  121. #121
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    2015 SC 5010
    I weight 175 pounds ride ready and sag is at 13 to 14mm.
    HSC 2
    LSC 8
    HSR 2
    LSR 10

    I like the back end to feel the bumps but still be controlled. I'm not a big fan of the soft and squishy Cadillac feeling. With this base tune, I have yet to feel the seat slap my butt and at the same time, it feels very "planted" to the ground. I would have to say that that is the thing I noticed the most. I felt like it was almost always in contact with the ground even on the never ending rocky rooty XC trails in my area.

    For my liking, i am very pleased with it and it took very little tweaking. Now if someone swapped my shock for something different that was correctly tuned, I probably couldn't notice a difference. That being said, I like the fact that you CAN get the tune correct just by tweaking it. You don't have to send it out to have it "Push'd" to get it in your personal sweet spot. And by buying the CC shock, I was supporting a relatively small US company and I was willing to pay more for that. But I also needed a new shock as this was a warranty replacement frame that didn't come with a shock and my old one wouldn't fit.

  122. #122
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    So.. Do I need new bushings when changing out my Fox Float CTD for this? And if so, can I use the ones for DBAir? Having a hard time finding any for DBInline...

  123. #123
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    BXCc how shock feel when climbing steep rocky sections on the trail? I find my fox to be harsh while climbing and I cant tune it out without my stumpy bobbing too much up steep rocky terrain.

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanger View Post
    So.. Do I need new bushings when changing out my Fox Float CTD for this? And if so, can I use the ones for DBAir? Having a hard time finding any for DBInline...
    I used the bushings from my Fox RP23 in my Inline if that helps. You will have to get the factory bushings pushed out first though. If you are buying direct from CC, tell them what bike it's going on and they will supply the correct bushings.

    Quote Originally Posted by stumpynerd View Post
    BXCc how shock feel when climbing steep rocky sections on the trail? I find my fox to be harsh while climbing and I cant tune it out without my stumpy bobbing too much up steep rocky terrain.
    Honestly, i didn't notice any bobbing or harshness. I really didn't notice the shock at all which is a good thing I suppose. The CS did stiffen it up but not to where it felt like it was rigid. But the only time I was paying attention to it was climbing a 75 yard long loose gravel / tennis ball size rocky road. Traction was great and it still felt like a full suspension bike.

  125. #125
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    This is the first Cane Creek shock that will fit Fox hardware and you can use RWC needle bearings on.

  126. #126
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    Ok guys, I know some of you are drooling for feedback. I haven't completely dialed in the shock yet (damn 8-6 work hours!) but I'm more than satisfied with it. The shock has cured many of bad characteristics of the Fox Float and also improved areas that I didn't think were a problem. The ability to dial in (or out) damping exactly how I feel I need to alter a characteristic of the bike cannot be underestimated. Very impressed so far, BUY THIS SHOCK (from Biker Bob too, great price)!

  127. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by whoodie View Post
    Ok guys, I know some of you are drooling for feedback. I haven't completely dialed in the shock yet (damn 8-6 work hours!) but I'm more than satisfied with it. The shock has cured many of bad characteristics of the Fox Float and also improved areas that I didn't think were a problem. The ability to dial in (or out) damping exactly how I feel I need to alter a characteristic of the bike cannot be underestimated. Very impressed so far, BUY THIS SHOCK (from Biker Bob too, great price)!
    Yes, as you predicted, your response is not a comprehensive review or feedback.
    What is your evaulation of the high speed circuits? Have you had any spiking, or hydrolocking at high shaft speeds? How many different trails have to run to evaulate the high speed circuit performance of this shock? These are the past shortcomings of the Cane Creek shocks, that people are wondering about. Screaming, "buy it!" is not exactly a proper performance review.
    ****

  128. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Yes, as you predicted, your response is not a comprehensive review or feedback.
    What is your evaulation of the high speed circuits? Have you had any spiking, or hydrolocking at high shaft speeds? How many different trails have to run to evaulate the high speed circuit performance of this shock? These are the past shortcomings of the Cane Creek shocks, that people are wondering about. Screaming, "buy it!" is not exactly a proper performance review.
    He's under no obligation to give you a review at all. If you need more of a review, go buy the shock and review it for yourself. Shocks don't come any better then the CC shocks. So, it's not like you're going to find anything better. Buy it, ride it and see how long the silly grin lasts on your face.

  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Shocks don't come any better then the CC shocks.
    Seriously? The first version of the DB had a way-too-heavy washer over the "piston" and it was claimed that the poppet valves would do everything and the oil would not flow through the piston, but it turns out this wasn't really optimal and a more standard "shim stack" setup was added over it, this is where those high-speed characteristics come into play. The original claim was false. You can tune the preload on the springs that control the valves and alter the characteristics obviously, but not the spring force it'self, which is a different parameter. It would most likely perform better if that internal shim-stack was tuned to the rider's weight/style/bike. Plenty of people have had failures and have had to ship them back. It's a decent shock, but it's by no means some end-all. The thing that really gets my attention is the high speed performance, several people are reporting it to be poor (spiking, etc) over several years.


    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  130. #130
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    Blah, blah, blah, blah. Go buy one and ride one. You guys are suffering from analysis paralysis.

  131. #131
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    I can only compare it directly against the stock Float CTD it replaced. Even without fully getting it dialed it outperforms the CTD - night and day difference.

    Over the years I have run lots of different shocks on a number of different bikes and have a good feel for what works for me. The Monarch RC3 plus had moments but had a very narrow window for the right setup, or throw a little too much trail at it and it pushed back in a not so favourable way.

    I go back to the Vector HLR Air as the only shock that felt as controlled. Beyond the HSC and LSC it had rebound (LSC I believe), but also had a piggyback where the air pressure could be adjusted along with the size of the piggyback chamber. It also had a sizeable air can so it was able to provide quite a plush ride that then could be setup to react as required by the user.

    I think the DBinline will provide that with the convenience of climb switch to easily on the fly tweak the setup. For me the key will be to get the open tune for descents and then possibly use the CS for altering, if required, the climbing feel.

    Again, I need to get some more time on the shock with familiar run under my belt, not to mention any break-in time for the shock.

    Again, it might not be the bees-knees for everyone but it beats the FOX CTD for me.

  132. #132
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    What kind of review do you expect on an Internet forum for a shock that has only been in the hands of consumers for two weeks?

  133. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Seriously? The first version of the DB had a way-too-heavy washer over the "piston" and it was claimed that the poppet valves would do everything and the oil would not flow through the piston, but it turns out this wasn't really optimal and a more standard "shim stack" setup was added over it, this is where those high-speed characteristics come into play. The original claim was false. You can tune the preload on the springs that control the valves and alter the characteristics obviously, but not the spring force it'self, which is a different parameter. It would most likely perform better if that internal shim-stack was tuned to the rider's weight/style/bike. Plenty of people have had failures and have had to ship them back. It's a decent shock, but it's by no means some end-all. The thing that really gets my attention is the high speed performance, several people are reporting it to be poor (spiking, etc) over several years.


    Your second photo shows a closeup of the original piston assembly for a coil shock. They have never used this assembly on an air shock.

    The shock is adjustable to a point that its possible to dial in bad settings as well. On another note, the majority of the issues have been related to air volume and the transfer between the air cans on early shocks. This was solved by a different inner air can.

    Since the piston acts more as a plunger, "tuning" the shim stack makes very little difference. It justs changes the range of the adjusters, which already cover wide open to closed down. The only "tuning" parameters are spring rate, volume of air, and adjuster setting.

  134. #134
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    Shawn, you are correct, no one is obligated to provide me with a review. May I remind you that this website is called MTB Review? And that one of the purposes of the manufacturers forums and the components forums is the sharing of information? Not everyone can afford to purchase every item that they have interest in.
    ****

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusSommers View Post
    Since the piston acts more as a plunger, "tuning" the shim stack makes very little difference.
    Then why is it there? It's clearly there in the photo. I'll submit that CCs original hype and theory wasn't quite correct, the shock does need to use it during some high-speed/displacement events, and as such, it's a parameter that should be tuned, along with poppet valve spring force (not spring preload). Like you said. the rebound and compression shim stacks affect the range of the shock, just like how you tune almost every other shock, except it's not as dramatic of an effect obviously.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  136. #136
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  137. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    ...The thing that really gets my attention is the high speed performance, several people are reporting it to be poor (spiking, etc) over several years.
    that's where i had my issues, and also why i ultimately ditched by CCDB Air CS. i've had the issue explained to me by a couple of different suspension gurus, and the issue seems to be that the CCDB's reliance on blowoff valves rather than a traditional shimmed setup results in some tendencies toward hydraulic lock in high speed events, particularly on bikes with rising rate suspension designs. that being said, i don't doubt that the inline is a fantastic shock, i just think that it is an item that will tend to work better on bikes with generally linear spring curves.
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  138. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyz View Post
    that's where i had my issues, and also why i ultimately ditched by CCDB Air CS. i've had the issue explained to me by a couple of different suspension gurus, and the issue seems to be that the CCDB's reliance on blowoff valves rather than a traditional shimmed setup results in some tendencies toward hydraulic lock in high speed events, particularly on bikes with rising rate suspension designs. that being said, i don't doubt that the inline is a fantastic shock, i just think that it is an item that will tend to work better on bikes with generally linear spring curves.
    Funny, the CCDB's have typically sucked on very linear frames because there's no progressiveness to the inherent springrate of the shock, or any position sensitivity to the damping. The only frames I've found where they don't suck have been progressive frames.

    Their HS circuits have always been a weak point in the past. The garbage about the HS poppet being the only source of high speed modulation is...well, garbage. That single poppet valve can't manage the 3 or 4 pressure zones within the shock, and it's silly to think that it can.

    That said, it's probably fine for a trail bike. I just ran into dead-ends with the HSC adjuster time after time with the coil shock on various DH bikes.

  139. #139
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    For the Inline, I think it's important to compare it to others in the same general market segment.

    Coming from a Fox Float CTD on my Intense Carbine 29, the Inline blows it out of the water. WAY more control. WAY better recovery. To get the Fox to not bounce, took a TON of rebound damping, and then the shock would pack down over successive rock hits. With the Inline, I'm plowing through a rock garden without bounce and the bike immediately recovers for the jumps to come. The Fox you could either be recovered and bouncing or semi controlled and packed down.

    Also important to note, that with the Float on Trail or Climb, the bike got extra bouncy. Let's say it's a very XC like Enduro stage with tons of pedaling. With the Fox I lose even more control in Climb mode. The rear end is bouncy. With the Inline the rear tracks over the terrain, the bike doesn't bounce off of roots, but at the same time, my pedaling forces seem to be controlled.

    Now I've never tried this bike with VPP and something like a Monarch Plus or Fox Float X, so I can't compare there, but compared to the inline Fox Float CTD, it's not even in the same ballpark.

  140. #140
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    Oh yeah!!

    I weigh 147lbs, with gear and a full pack... I achieved my desired sag (approx 12-14mm) at 140psi.
    After one ride of tweaking, I am feeling pretty good about, but not fully set on:

    HSC-2.5
    LSC-9
    HSR-2
    LSR-13
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-burner-inline.jpg  

    Last edited by J-Ha; 08-14-2014 at 12:32 PM.

  141. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Then why is it there? It's clearly there in the photo. I'll submit that CCs original hype and theory wasn't quite correct, the shock does need to use it during some high-speed/displacement events, and as such, it's a parameter that should be tuned, along with poppet valve spring force (not spring preload). Like you said. the rebound and compression shim stacks affect the range of the shock, just like how you tune almost every other shock, except it's not as dramatic of an effect obviously.
    There are not separate rebound and compression shim stacks on the DB air piston. Just one pyramid stack behind the piston. Changing this arrangement would simply make the adjusters ineffective at maintaining a useful range for 99% of all bicycles. The thickness of that stack was determined to allow the adjusters to control the damping in a useful range.

    Using the adjusters correctly accomplishes the same thing that other shocks do at the shim stack. The idea is allow tuning without opening the damper. You could never get an inline fox shock to do this because there are not independent channels for the oil, so the adjustments can not be independent.

    The poppet valve spring force and size of the oil ports are different on different CCDB shocks. Its dependent on length and stroke. The air shock gets a lighter compression spring and a larger oil port for compression because of the progressive nature of an air spring. The longest of the coil shocks also gets a different compression assembly.

    Early shocks were having trouble transferring air between the cans, creating a spring rate that was too progressive and led to spiking. This didn't have anything to do with the damper.

    Remember, since the piston is just a plunger, any change to that shim stack would affect both rebound and compression, because it is forcing oil through both circuits. There are not a lot of situations where you would want to affect the same change to both circuits, so this is not considered a tuning parameter for the damper.

  142. #142
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    Marcus, can you explain why there is a shim stack only on the compression side of the piston? Is the HSR poppet sufficient enough to provide rapid recovery say, when riding through a rock garden at high speed? I don't know why CC shims one side, but not the other.
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  143. #143
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    Makes sense since rebound force can only be as strong as the spring force so cc can design the hsr to be sufficiently fast. You don't want crazy fast rebound anyways. A fast square edge hit is going to need a lot of oil flow to not spike, hence the shim stack.
    I'm curious to know what the force curve looks like for poppet vs shim

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  144. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by GH28 View Post
    Funny, the CCDB's have typically sucked on very linear frames because there's no progressiveness to the inherent springrate of the shock, or any position sensitivity to the damping. The only frames I've found where they don't suck have been progressive frames.
    yeah i may be misunderstanding or miscommunicating (likely both) the advice i was given...i think it has more to do with the "smoothness" of the leverage curve. Sure, you can make a CCDB Air progressive by dropping volume spacers in it, but I think the HSC spiking comes from relatively small oil ports in a very complex system that are more susceptible to hydraulic lock.
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  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Marcus, can you explain why there is a shim stack only on the compression side of the piston? Is the HSR poppet sufficient enough to provide rapid recovery say, when riding through a rock garden at high speed? I don't know why CC shims one side, but not the other.
    Sure that's the compression side? It's at the end of the shaft it seems and would "blow off" when pulled out of the shock (rebound?)???

    The article implied the shock in the pic, ccdb coil I think, had a stack on both sides, just that the far side can't be seen?
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  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Marcus, can you explain why there is a shim stack only on the compression side of the piston? Is the HSR poppet sufficient enough to provide rapid recovery say, when riding through a rock garden at high speed? I don't know why CC shims one side, but not the other.
    For the record, this is relevant ONLY to the CCDB Air, not the coil version. The coil version has a rebound shim stack on the main piston (as shown in the photos above), the air version does not.

    The reason the air sprung version doesn't have a rebound shim stack is because of the progressive spring curve. By forcing more oil through the rebound adjusters (instead of allowing some through the shim stack) at high velocities, you can essentially put a ceiling on the maximum rebound speed that the shock can achieve. This is beneficial in terms of control towards the bottom of the stroke where the progressive spring generates disproportionately higher forces than the mid-stroke. Given the DB dampers' tendency to have very digressive rebound damping curves as it is (relatively low HSR rates) this is more necessary than on dampers that typically run linear (Fox/RS) or progressive (Marz, some BOS tunes) rebound curves.

    Almost everything Marcus has said is correct, with the exception of his comment regarding reshimming the main piston affecting both compression and rebound - obviously revalving one side of the piston will only affect one direction of the stroke.
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  147. #147
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    https://ep1.pinkbike.org/p3pb10960901/p3pb10960901.jpg

    This is the piston off the inline. Looks like they are doing shims compression side.

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  148. #148
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    Re: New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Sure that's the compression side? It's at the end of the shaft it seems and would "blow off" when pulled out of the shock (rebound?)???
    Its a twin tube shock. The piston doesn't have to flow oil during reb.

  149. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktm520 View Post
    Its a twin tube shock. The piston doesn't have to flow oil during reb.
    Even so, it still follows the laws of which way oil has to flow, unless you think it's going to somehow be flowing in reverse. Do you realize which way the oil flows through a pyramid stack?
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  150. #150
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    I've just been for a short ride today (12K's) before the pending rain for late today and tomorrow.

    I found also I increased my air charge pressure from 120Psi to 140Psi made no difference in sag, still about 25mm. I weigh about 78Kg kitted up. (CC recommend 20Psi less your weight on set up).
    My ride was my usual haunt/fire trail that I use regularly on the weekends and also good to compare between my original Fox Float CTD shock that was fitted to my 2014 Specialized Enduro Expert 29".

    Ok, in comparison to the Fox, the DBinline shock (with original supplied settings) is an improvement and a more smooth ride that was noticeable and had no issues.

    The CS switch is located the shock piston, thus lower than a Fox Float CTD, as I'm new to this shock, I found I was actually trying to locate the CS but finding the air connection(?) whilst riding along. Eventually by the end of my ride I was confidant of it's location.

    What I did find with the DBinline, was I only had to use the CS switch only on the climbs, where as the Fox Float CTD I was changing the switch for every climb Trail Descent. So less hassle and one thing less to worry about.

    I still could climb as before, but this depends on the available traction on the fire trail (sand and rocky), which during the week had rained.
    I could reach some the top of my climbs but as usual in some places I still had to get off and walk (nothing new to comment about).

    Descents were good and whilst out of the saddle you could feel the shock movement plush on the big sharp hits (mainly rocks and small drop offs with rough terrain of the weathered fire trail. The shock was supple to small hits whilst in the sitting on the saddle.

    As the 2015 Spec web site now show's the CC DBinline fitted to the Elite, Expert, S-Works, leaving the Float Flat CTD now left to the Comp.

    Ok, I know I'm just a weekend hack, but there are a lot more people who will provide a more precise or more technical comments in reviews later on in regards about the Cane Creek DBinline shock.

    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-2014-august-005.jpg

    The questions you could ask, if there was a blindfold test to compare the differences of CC to the FOX on a ride, would you be able to pick the shock. In my short ride, I'm happy to say yes.

  151. #151
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    Re: New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Even so, it still follows the laws of which way oil has to flow, unless you think it's going to somehow be flowing in reverse. Do you realize which way the oil flows through a pyramid stack?
    Do you realize how a twin tube shock works? On reb, the piston forces all oil through the outer tube and back around through the lsr/hsr orifice.

    https://brimages.bikeboardmedia.netd...-diagrams0.jpg

  152. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktm520 View Post
    Do you realize how a twin tube shock works? On reb, the piston forces all oil through the outer tube and back around through the lsr/hsr orifice.

    https://brimages.bikeboardmedia.netd...-diagrams0.jpg
    Well how about this, on compression, the piston forces the fluid towards the reservoir end, except when the hit is too fast, then the shims flex and the oil is passed through the shims, the oil may still be flowing "mostly" in the direction towards the reservoir end, but relative to the piston when it starts flowing through the shims it's opposite direction flow. Otherwise, it wouldn't make any sense at all.

    You don't have to take my word for it. here's the webpage with the picture of the coil-shock piston head:

    Cane Creek Factory Tour ? New Colors, New AER Cap and Double Barrel Dyno!

    You can see pretty well in this air-shock cutaway which side the compression shims are on, there is a washer over the rebound like you describe, but it's on the opposite side that you are claiming.



    The CCDB and a normal shock are going to attempt to push fluid the exact same direction, the CCDB will actually do it due to the twin tube design, but you are not thinking about when the fluid can't move fast enough, then it's back to square one, pretend the fluid isn't moving at all, since effectively it's not, shock works just like a regular shock in this extreme. Shims flex, oil bypasses. No big deal.

    This one's even better (need to click on link to see full-size and see the shims):
    https://www.sicklines.com/gallery/da...Air_1280-8.jpg
    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek-dbair_1280-8.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  153. #153
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    Not arguing about flow rates, purely stating that it doesn't need a reb circuit in the piston to ... rebound. I have no beef with this shock or desire to own one.

  154. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktm520 View Post
    Not arguing about flow rates, purely stating that it doesn't need a reb circuit in the piston to ... rebound. I have no beef with this shock or desire to own one.
    The original discussion was whether we were looking at the rebound or compression side in the picture I posted. It was the coil shock and the rebound side, but it was mistakenly identified as the compression side because someone thought it was the air shock. Go back and read it if you like.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  155. #155
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    Why are we bickering about a completely different shock. This is the Inline thread, not the "issues with other past CC shocks" thread. Knowledge is great but can we stay focused on what is relevant to the Inline?

  156. #156
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    anyone had any issue with rebound not slow enough

  157. #157
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    Isn't rebound dependent on air pressure?

  158. #158
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    not just air pressure but anyone over 180psi have the rebound set slow enough?

  159. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    not just air pressure but anyone over 180psi have the rebound set slow enough?
    HSR or LSR? What frame?

    I have mine pressurised at 210PSi and no problem with rebound.

  160. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoFa73 View Post
    HSR or LSR? What frame?

    I have mine pressurised at 210PSi and no problem with rebound.
    Ditto.

  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoFa73 View Post
    HSR or LSR? What frame?

    I have mine pressurised at 210PSi and no problem with rebound.
    what frame and shock size?

  162. #162
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    Knolly endorphin. Shock size: 7.875 x 2.25

  163. #163
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    Giant Trance 27.5. Shock size: 7.875 x 2.0

  164. #164
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    Anyone here who has gone from a DBAir into DBInline and provide some good feedback?
    Other than the weight, purely performance. Thanks in advance!

  165. #165
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    Finally back in town and got out for another ride on the DBInline. I was at approx 195psi before and it felt a little soft as I started out the ride. Increased pressure to 205 then again to just a touch over 210 and felt like I hit the mark. I also added 1/4 turn of both HSR and LSR. Will have to remember to count the turns from open to record this setting properly.

    For the most part I left the CS wide open, with this setup on my Trance SX still felt quite plush yet extremely well controlled. The ride I did last night had a lot of climbing much of it quite technical, the shock provided all the traction I use, just need stronger legs and lungs.

    One particular trail was a higher speed with lots of decently sized woops with steep and sharp berms. Although not super skilled at pump track type riding I was able to pump through and keep the rear stuck on the ground and not feel and harsh hits through the g-outs, or I could pop off the woop and get a little air. The Fox CTD would not have provided both.

    On another section of trail it was tight, rough with roots and rocks and still pretty fast. The DBinline felt great through it to the point where I was somewhat pushing more on the back and lightening up the front end a little to compensate for the fork.

  166. #166
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    Has anyone put volume spacers in yet?

  167. #167
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    Interesting to see the high psi for different suspension designs. On my Carbine 29 with VPP2, at a 175lb body weight, I get proper sag (17mm) at 130psi in the shock. Weird to see 200+ but I guess different leverage ratios and all that.

  168. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    Interesting to see the high psi for different suspension designs. On my Carbine 29 with VPP2, at a 175lb body weight, I get proper sag (17mm) at 130psi in the shock. Weird to see 200+ but I guess different leverage ratios and all that.
    I am almost 190lbs, ride with a well equipped camelback on a Trance SX (2.8:1 leverage ratio - 140mm travel and 50mm stroke). With the 210 psi I am around 15mm sag (plus/minus 2mm) so running about 28-30%. I likely could run less pressure then use the CS during most riding to firm up the shock, however, as it is setup, it seems to handle pretty much all conditions very well and I can leave the CS wide open. Should note that with this setup I get within 10mm of using all travel. Did not hit any large drops but did run though some rough terrain, so I think I am pretty close on the correct air pressure. Might be able to drop a couple of PSI, but it is nice to have little reserve for a harsh hit.

    What is the stroke on the Carbine - 2.25" / 57mm?, 17mm is about 30% sag so, it is similar is setup. Do you use the CS, what about your other settings.

  169. #169
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    I'm noticing a weird notchiness in the first 10mm of travel on my Inline. I didn't notice it at first when I was doing the initial setup, but now it's fairly obvious. Has anybody else noticed this?

    Probably doesn't matter, but I'm on an Intense Carbine 275.

  170. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilether View Post
    I'm noticing a weird notchiness in the first 10mm of travel on my Inline. I didn't notice it at first when I was doing the initial setup, but now it's fairly obvious. Has anybody else noticed this?

    Probably doesn't matter, but I'm on an Intense Carbine 275.
    I noticed the same on both the DBAIR CS and DBInline (Enduro 29). You can't feel it on a ride, but when setting sag and cycling the rear (pushing down with forearm) it is there. To be fair, I also notice this on a Float X on my Bronson.

  171. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Autocratic View Post
    Has anyone put volume spacers in yet?
    I have. Very easy to do. I don't have a before/after comparison though because the CC recommendation was to ride it with 1 large spacer for the E29 and I wanted to verify there was already on in there. There wasn't so I installed one before riding.

  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilether View Post
    I'm noticing a weird notchiness in the first 10mm of travel on my Inline. I didn't notice it at first when I was doing the initial setup, but now it's fairly obvious. Has anybody else noticed this?

    Probably doesn't matter, but I'm on an Intense Carbine 275.
    I notice it to when setting sag but not riding, i think i read somewhere it has something todo with the negativ air spring.

  173. #173
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    Took mine out for a first ride last night round the commonwealth course. I'm pretty bloody impressed with it. Wrote a few words down in my blog if you are interested.

    Cane Creek DB inline first ride review | MTB mumblings

    Going to have a fiddle with the settings the next dry day we have here.

  174. #174
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    I bought mine from TFT tuned aswell, but i have to say the tuning setup they did was not great.
    Made some Changes and it feels good. Going to try Knolly:s basetune since it's not been availible Before.

  175. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoFa73 View Post
    I bought mine from TFT tuned aswell, but i have to say the tuning setup they did was not great.
    Made some Changes and it feels good. Going to try Knolly:s basetune since it's not been availible Before.
    what did you have to change? was the air pressure different in the previous shock?

  176. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideitall View Post
    What is the stroke on the Carbine - 2.25" / 57mm?, 17mm is about 30% sag so, it is similar is setup. Do you use the CS, what about your other settings.
    Yea, 2.25", so 30% sag. I'm wondering if I'm actually not reserving anything for the really big hits. I did some 3ft to semi-flat drops and used 99% of travel. There was maybe 1-2mm of travel left on the other side of the o ring. I could put another 5-10psi in the air spring, and take away some more HSC possibly.

    My settings are:
    HSC: 1.5
    HSR: 2
    LSC: 5
    LSR: 5

    I basically took the base tune provided and backed down the LSR and LSC based on a recommendation from CC. Then after doing some test rides, I noticed a bit of chatter so I took the HSC down half a turn. It feels pretty awesome. I haven't experimented further as I had a race, so I just left it. Got the 5 day Crested Butte enduro coming up, so I think I'm just going to leave it and play/tune more when I come back east.

    I've been using the CS switch only for true XC stuff and on the transfer stages at last weekend's enduro.

  177. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by POAH View Post
    what did you have to change? was the air pressure different in the previous shock?
    Air pressure was a little lower in my FOX CTD. 190 psi

    TFT tuned it as followed.(from fully open)
    HSC 1/2 Turn
    LSC 4 clicks
    HSR 4 turns
    LSR 12 clicks

    After tinkering i ended up with.
    HSC 1 turn
    LSC 7 clicks
    HSR 2,5 turns
    LSR 9 clicks

    Knolly (recommended start):
    HSC: 1.75
    LSC: 4
    HSR: 2.25
    LSR: 11

    I already was thinking about adding more HSC since it bottoms out a little to easy. And the LSC i upped since i like less pedal bob. The HSR and HSC on TFT tuned tune was off, the bike had no pop att all and bottomed out just bunny hopping with the sag set to 30%.

  178. #178
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    So TF Tuned gets this shock a few weeks ago and instantly evaluates it, wont sell it to riders who would need to run greater than 180 PSI and poorly tunes it for lighter riders.

    Cane Creek has tested it over a period of years and has major bike manufactures such as Specialized on board and selling it on new bikes right now. Seems likely they would have noticed that it had a flaw as major as this.
    Last edited by pablobell; 08-21-2014 at 09:04 PM.

  179. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    So TF Tuned gets this shock a few weeks ago and instantly evaluates it, wont sell it to riders who would need to run greater than 180 PSI and poorly tunes it for lighter riders.

    Cane Creek has tested it over a period of years and has major bike manufactures such as Specialized on board and selling it on new bikes right now. Seems likely they would have noticed that it had a flaw as major as this.
    I had no problem dealing or buying a DB inline from TFT tune and customer service was great, The tune was not. I did preeorder one. I have a ride weight about 210lbs and TFT tuned know that since they asked.
    Some guy at on the knolly forum said they claimed it to have rebound issues with pressures over 200psi, and that they experienced the same with the DB air CS. I Think it's wierd because i haven't read anywhere about rebound issues and not being able to slow it down enough on any cane Creek DB shocks.

    Had you contacted TFT tuned and they denied Selling it to you because you are a heavier rider?

  180. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilether View Post
    I'm noticing a weird notchiness in the first 10mm of travel on my Inline. I didn't notice it at first when I was doing the initial setup, but now it's fairly obvious. Has anybody else noticed this?

    Probably doesn't matter, but I'm on an Intense Carbine 275.
    Normal it is the negative spring.

    The explanation I read was something along lines of 'the notch sensation about 5-10mm into the travel is the point at which the negative spring pressure is equal to the positive spring. It is not noticeable when riding'

  181. #181
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    Can anyone compare the DB Inline to a Monarch? I have a 140mm on my 2014 KHS 6500 and it's kinda lackluster in comparison to my 150mm Pike, I wonder if it would be worth the dollars.

    What I'd like to improve is response when climbing without having to lock it all the time. Now I either put up with excessive compression or I lock it, ProPedal works okay but makes the ride too firm.

  182. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Can anyone compare the DB Inline to a Monarch? I have a 140mm on my 2014 KHS 6500 and it's kinda lackluster in comparison to my 150mm Pike, I wonder if it would be worth the dollars.

    What I'd like to improve is response when climbing without having to lock it all the time. Now I either put up with excessive compression or I lock it, ProPedal works okay but makes the ride too firm.
    the Climb switch is better than the compression switch on the monarch. I had a 2014 monarch plus on my bike previous. it slows down compression without being too hard. the main difference is that the inline is tuned more to you where as the monarch is a standard tune so may not suit everyone.

  183. #183
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    DBinline setup info (long response)

    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    ... My settings are:
    HSC: 1.5
    HSR: 2
    LSC: 5
    LSR: 5 ...
    Interesting that there is so much difference in the recommended setup on two different multi-link bikes (Intense VPP and Giant Maestro) with similar ratios.

    For my ride last night, I simply eye-balled the sag as being close enough, but then did make some changes to the setup. The base or recommended tune for the Trance
    HSC: 2
    HSR: 7
    LSC: 2
    LSR: 10

    I am set at something like:
    HSC: 2.25
    HSR: 11
    LSC: 2.25
    LSR: 12

    Will need to verify the exact setup I have right now, seems to work very well for me.

    I did a ride last night that was climbing based, involving quite technical climbs with set-ups on the climbing that ranged from 10" to 15" ledges along with lots of roots and rocks. The bike was stable when either sitting or standing on climbs and without any changes felt nice and plush on descents. Left the CS in the off position.

    What really let me know I had the setup right was toward the end of the ride when I was starting to get really bagged and hit a pretty sharp g-out and the bottom of a small descent. I manage to loft the front end a little as I hit the g-out, but was pretty much sitting on the seat as the rear of the bike hit it. Guess what, the bike and shock just handled it, the compression damping did its job on helping slow the compression without being harsh and the rebound was spot on in that it did rebound out of it nicely without getting bucked and was ready for the rootball section that followed.

    If I had tried that with the Float CTD, it would have either packed up on the rootball section right after the g-out or I would have been catapulted from the rebound on the g-out.

    It is so nice to be able to dial in a shock to work like this. Haven't had any extended DH type runs to see if it stays consistent or handles the heat build up, but I am confident that it will work just fine, at least for my needs and capabilities.

  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideitall View Post
    Interesting that there is so much difference in the recommended setup on two different multi-link bikes (Intense VPP and Giant Maestro) with similar ratios.

    For my ride last night, I simply eye-balled the sag as being close enough, but then did make some changes to the setup. The base or recommended tune for the Trance
    HSC: 2
    HSR: 7
    LSC: 2
    LSR: 10

    I am set at something like:
    HSC: 2.25
    HSR: 11
    LSC: 2.25
    LSR: 12

    Will need to verify the exact setup I have right now, seems to work very well for me.

    I did a ride last night that was climbing based, involving quite technical climbs with set-ups on the climbing that ranged from 10" to 15" ledges along with lots of roots and rocks. The bike was stable when either sitting or standing on climbs and without any changes felt nice and plush on descents. Left the CS in the off position.

    What really let me know I had the setup right was toward the end of the ride when I was starting to get really bagged and hit a pretty sharp g-out and the bottom of a small descent. I manage to loft the front end a little as I hit the g-out, but was pretty much sitting on the seat as the rear of the bike hit it. Guess what, the bike and shock just handled it, the compression damping did its job on helping slow the compression without being harsh and the rebound was spot on in that it did rebound out of it nicely without getting bucked and was ready for the rootball section that followed.

    If I had tried that with the Float CTD, it would have either packed up on the rootball section right after the g-out or I would have been catapulted from the rebound on the g-out.

    It is so nice to be able to dial in a shock to work like this. Haven't had any extended DH type runs to see if it stays consistent or handles the heat build up, but I am confident that it will work just fine, at least for my needs and capabilities.
    You must have mixed something up in writing down your settings. HSC and HSR only have 4,5 turns, LSC and LSR have 18 clicks.

  185. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoFa73 View Post
    You must have mixed something up in writing down your settings. HSC and HSR only have 4,5 turns, LSC and LSR have 18 clicks.
    Yes, I did mix the numbers. I had copied the post by trhoppe, but was using the format from the CC base tune page.

    The Cane Creek base tune is:
    HSC: 2
    LSC: 7
    HSR: 2
    LSR: 10

    The settings I have arrived at with approx 14-15mm sag are:
    HSC: 2.25
    LSC: 11
    HSR: 2.25
    LSR: 12

    With this setup I used all but the last 1/4" (7mm to 8mm) of travel on the shock. That leaves a little in reserve for a larger hit. Maybe I can back up the HSC 1/4 turn. Will leave as is for the next few rides and get a better feeling for it.

    Hopefully that makes sense.

  186. #186
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Will they ever make one for 160mm bikes

  187. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by v0n View Post
    Will they ever make one for 160mm bikes
    What frame has a 160mm travel without room for a PB shock?
    Ripley LS v3
    OG Ripley v2 handed down to son

  188. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by v0n View Post
    Will they ever make one for 160mm bikes
    If the shock size is available in DB inline, then there should not be a problem using it.

  189. #189
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    What frame has a 160mm travel without room for a PB shock?
    Norco range killer b xs frame

  190. #190
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by JoFa73 View Post
    If the shock size is available in DB inline, then there should not be a problem using it.
    Gotcha. Sorry if its a dumb question but the dimension are 8.5x2.48 or something like that vs 8.5x2.5... I would loose travel if I used this shock no?

  191. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by v0n View Post
    Gotcha. Sorry if its a dumb question but the dimension are 8.5x2.48 or something like that vs 8.5x2.5... I would loose travel if I used this shock no?
    The shocks sizes are usually standardized. what shock is on the bike now?
    Use the fit finder on cane creek website.
    Cane Creek Double Barrel and DBAIR Shock Fit Finder

  192. #192
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Ive used it and it tell me it fits

  193. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by v0n View Post
    Gotcha. Sorry if its a dumb question but the dimension are 8.5x2.48 or something like that vs 8.5x2.5... I would loose travel if I used this shock no?
    For all intents and purposes, 8.5x2.48 = 8.5x2.5. Measurement error.

  194. #194
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    For all intents and purposes, 8.5x2.48 = 8.5x2.5. Measurement error.
    ,thanks


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  195. #195
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    New inline Double Barrel Cane Creek

    I have a 3 year old Spider 29 which I decided to upgrade. I bought a Pike RTC3 140 , 142x12 axle and drop outs , Roval SL Fatties and the DB Inline. The Pike replaced a Reba 140 RLT, the DB Inline replaced a Monarch RT3 which replaced the broken Fox RPL. I also have some I9 Enduro's and love them, I was an early adopter of I9 wheels and have them on a few bikes. I'll use the I9's on more shuttle service riding and ledgier terrain with some burlier tires probably Hans Dampf's The Roval's have Nobby Nics.

    Here's my suspension set up at 155lbs. riding weight:
    • Pike RCT3 140, 3 bottomless tokens, 55 psi 30ish% sag,
    • 5 clicks FFO LSC
    • 5 clicks FFO rebound.
    • DB Inline 190 x 50, 120 mil travel, [email protected] large volume spacer in the can (the whole spacer), 120 psi 15 mil sag, 30%
    • 1.5 turns HSC
    • 6 clicks LSC
    • 2.25 turns HSR
    • 7 clicks LSR

    She's really feeling good and I'm taking off on a week+ bike trip this Saturday! Here she is as she sits at 27.5 lbs. A very capable bike especially for the her weight!
    Last edited by manitou2200; 08-29-2014 at 06:18 PM.

  196. #196
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    Sounds like most people are impressed with the DBinline thus far
    I'm looking at upgrading the Monarch RT3 on a 2014 Giant Trance. Coming off a 2011 Commencal Meta 55 with Fox RP23 I've been really unimpressed with the Monarch...

    Both bikes are 140mm, but the Giant with Monarch feels nothing short of skittish. No doubt part of this is suspension design (Meta is basically a mini DH bike design), but I'm quite sure the shock is underperforming. Also did a few short DH runs (2 minute track) on a fairly mild track, the rebound damping went to essentially zero on the Monarch. I could feel it on the bike, and confirmed off the bike at the end... Never anything like that sort of damping loss riding longer/faster/rougher stuff with the RP23.

    Anyhow, I'm looking at going to the DBinline as I really want to make the most of what is otherwise a well sorted bike. For those that have already installed this shock on the Trance, what hardware is required? I sent the chaps at CC an email, and they said only the lower mount hardware is required (22mm x 8mm), as the upper stuff is part of the frame (built in axle with roller bearings I believe). Seems 22.1 x 8 is the closest available for the lower mount, so I'm assuming that's what they meant...

    Thanks

  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeC90 View Post
    Sounds like most people are impressed with the DBinline thus far
    I'm looking at upgrading the Monarch RT3 on a 2014 Giant Trance. Coming off a 2011 Commencal Meta 55 with Fox RP23 I've been really unimpressed with the Monarch...

    Both bikes are 140mm, but the Giant with Monarch feels nothing short of skittish. No doubt part of this is suspension design (Meta is basically a mini DH bike design), but I'm quite sure the shock is underperforming. Also did a few short DH runs (2 minute track) on a fairly mild track, the rebound damping went to essentially zero on the Monarch. I could feel it on the bike, and confirmed off the bike at the end... Never anything like that sort of damping loss riding longer/faster/rougher stuff with the RP23.

    Anyhow, I'm looking at going to the DBinline as I really want to make the most of what is otherwise a well sorted bike. For those that have already installed this shock on the Trance, what hardware is required? I sent the chaps at CC an email, and they said only the lower mount hardware is required (22mm x 8mm), as the upper stuff is part of the frame (built in axle with roller bearings I believe). Seems 22.1 x 8 is the closest available for the lower mount, so I'm assuming that's what they meant...

    Thanks
    I haven't installed this shock on my Trance, but tried to use an X-Fusion Vector Air HLR on it (unsuccessfully).

    You can use the hardware on your Monarch. No other thing necessary.
    The lower mount does NOT require hardware at all, heck, the eyelet doesn't even has a bushing. It all rolls on one of the main pivots' bearings. PITA to access to.
    The upper part is the 22mm stuff. Don't sweat 0.1mm unless you are looking at bearing kits.

    My Trance feels pretty much "meh" with a Fox CTD. All brands make crap shocks. EDIT... Maybe not CC, but their former air-damped shocks were not really brilliant either.

    You can also go for a Float X or Monarch Plus if you are not set on the InLine, but at retail prices is hard not to go with the CC one.
    Check my Site

  198. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeC90 View Post
    Sounds like most people are impressed with the DBinline thus far
    I'm looking at upgrading the Monarch RT3 on a 2014 Giant Trance. Coming off a 2011 Commencal Meta 55 with Fox RP23 I've been really unimpressed with the Monarch...

    Both bikes are 140mm, but the Giant with Monarch feels nothing short of skittish. No doubt part of this is suspension design (Meta is basically a mini DH bike design), but I'm quite sure the shock is underperforming. Also did a few short DH runs (2 minute track) on a fairly mild track, the rebound damping went to essentially zero on the Monarch. I could feel it on the bike, and confirmed off the bike at the end... Never anything like that sort of damping loss riding longer/faster/rougher stuff with the RP23.

    Anyhow, I'm looking at going to the DBinline as I really want to make the most of what is otherwise a well sorted bike. For those that have already installed this shock on the Trance, what hardware is required? I sent the chaps at CC an email, and they said only the lower mount hardware is required (22mm x 8mm), as the upper stuff is part of the frame (built in axle with roller bearings I believe). Seems 22.1 x 8 is the closest available for the lower mount, so I'm assuming that's what they meant...

    Thanks
    Yeah, I'm impressed with the shock so far, I'll really get to asses it in the next week or so on a riding trip. Cane Creek supplies the mounting hardware as part of the price. I'm not sure why so many here are not supplied with the CC hardware when they purchased their Inline through a dealer. It's nice Norglide hardware and should help the shock do it's job a bite easier especially on the link attachment. The Inline has more oil than the Fox Float or Monarch and the oil in the dampening circuits flows thought the top forged circuits with the adjusters at the top of the shock which is a heat sink also and helps to cool the oil.

    I actually like the Monarch quite a bit more than the Fox RP3 and RPL's I had on my Spider 29. I was going to put a Debonair can on the Monarch but they are still not shipping the Debonair upgrade kits yet. I may still get one when they are available and see if I can get the compression shim stack opened up a bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Warp View Post
    I haven't installed this shock on my Trance, but tried to use an X-Fusion Vector Air HLR on it (unsuccessfully).

    You can use the hardware on your Monarch. No other thing necessary.
    The lower mount does NOT require hardware at all, heck, the eyelet doesn't even has a bushing. It all rolls on one of the main pivots' bearings. PITA to access to.
    The upper part is the 22mm stuff. Don't sweat 0.1mm unless you are looking at bearing kits.

    My Trance feels pretty much "meh" with a Fox CTD. All brands make crap shocks. EDIT... Maybe not CC, but their former air-damped shocks were not really brilliant either.

    You can also go for a Float X or Monarch Plus if you are not set on the InLine, but at retail prices is hard not to go with the CC one.
    The Fox and RS are not junk they are just tuned from the manufacturers with excessive compression dampening to (sort of) work with a variety of dual link bikes using a M/M tune. It makes them less responsive at slow speed bump compliance and kind of dead feeling. The great thing about these Inline's is ease of tuning all aspects of the shock performance especially if you already have a pretty good base tune to start with. I used the Spider Comp BT which has 10 mil more travel and a 2.6:1 LR vs. the 2.4:1 LR of my Spider 29 AL. So I tweaked the tune from there. I backed off the LSC and added a little bit of HSC and HSR. You need to use the CC hardware on these shocks, I mean they supply it as part of the price, so why wouldn't you? It's nice hardware!

    The other thing with these Inline's is they have a XV air can standard so pretty much every trail bike out there that can use these shocks needs to use some of the air can volume spacers to make the air spring more progressive towards the end stroke to tune for bottom out. That's 5 levels of adjustment vs. 2 or maybe 3 on most other shocks that would compete with the Inline.
    Last edited by manitou2200; 08-30-2014 at 06:53 AM.

  199. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp View Post
    I haven't installed this shock on my Trance, but tried to use an X-Fusion Vector Air HLR on it (unsuccessfully).

    You can use the hardware on your Monarch. No other thing necessary.
    The lower mount does NOT require hardware at all, heck, the eyelet doesn't even has a bushing. It all rolls on one of the main pivots' bearings. PITA to access to.
    The upper part is the 22mm stuff. Don't sweat 0.1mm unless you are looking at bearing kits.

    My Trance feels pretty much "meh" with a Fox CTD. All brands make crap shocks. EDIT... Maybe not CC, but their former air-damped shocks were not really brilliant either.

    You can also go for a Float X or Monarch Plus if you are not set on the InLine, but at retail prices is hard not to go with the CC one.
    Thanks for the info. So to confirm, I shouldn't need to purchase any hardware with the shock to install? The lower mount is part of the bike and the top stuff will be the same for both the CC and RS shock?

    I se the lower mount/pivot is a it of an odd setup, which I presume you are mean to to use special tools for...? Can it also be done with an appropriately sized spanner or shifter?

    Regarding the actual shock performance/choice, I had also looked at the Monarch Plus/Fox options, but for the relatively small price difference I would have thought the CC should be a slightly better thing...

  200. #200
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    Yes your mounting hardware understanding is correct. You only need an open ended wrench and an Allen/hex key to remove the pivot bolt at the bottom, same as the top.

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