Need help with DHX 4.0 settings- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Need help with DHX 4.0 settings

    Hi guys, looking for a little bit of help here. Just ordered a 2006 Specialized Enduro Elite, which comes with a DHX Air 4.0 (8.5"x2.25") on the back. This is my first full suspension bike (last one was a Stumpy HT), and I'm really excited to be going FS finally.

    I've also ordered a shock pump to use in setting up (playin around with) the rear shock, but it looks like it's back-ordered and won't be here until at least a week or two after my bike gets here. The shop I’m buying it from said they could help me set up the rear suspension when I pick it up, but I question how much experience they’ve had with this sort of thing. They’re more focused on the commuter and XC crowd, they rarely even carry FS bikes in their shop. Once I get my pump, it’s not a big deal as I can play with the various settings as much as I want, but in the meantime I want to at least be in the right ball-park to fully enjoy my new bike as much as possible the first couple of weeks.

    Anyway, been reading tons on these forums about similar setups (and read the Fox manuals), but if people could offer up some suggestions on what would be good starting places in terms of PSI (and other) settings for the rear shock, I’d appreciate it. I weight 190 with gear, and plan on do a full mixture of singletrack, 3-4’ drops, some urban hucking, and even longer XC rides. I like it all!

    Thanks for any help guys!
    Tarekith.com

    '17 Specialized Enduro Elite 29

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarekith
    Hi guys, looking for a little bit of help here. Just ordered a 2006 Specialized Enduro Elite, which comes with a DHX Air 4.0 (8.5"x2.25") on the back. This is my first full suspension bike (last one was a Stumpy HT), and I'm really excited to be going FS finally.

    I've also ordered a shock pump to use in setting up (playin around with) the rear shock, but it looks like it's back-ordered and won't be here until at least a week or two after my bike gets here. The shop I’m buying it from said they could help me set up the rear suspension when I pick it up, but I question how much experience they’ve had with this sort of thing. They’re more focused on the commuter and XC crowd, they rarely even carry FS bikes in their shop. Once I get my pump, it’s not a big deal as I can play with the various settings as much as I want, but in the meantime I want to at least be in the right ball-park to fully enjoy my new bike as much as possible the first couple of weeks.

    Anyway, been reading tons on these forums about similar setups (and read the Fox manuals), but if people could offer up some suggestions on what would be good starting places in terms of PSI (and other) settings for the rear shock, I’d appreciate it. I weight 190 with gear, and plan on do a full mixture of singletrack, 3-4’ drops, some urban hucking, and even longer XC rides. I like it all!

    Thanks for any help guys!
    Most important thing to do is make sure you have at least the minimum PSI of air in it or else it may ge ruined.

    There should be a set of numbers on the shock near the air valve that give the pressure range. I would try starting at the minimum (should be around 75 psi) and see how that feels. If it feels too soft start upping it 10 psi at a time until it feels good. Also, remember that shock pumps will leave you with the correct pressure when you take it off, but when you put the pump back on the air inside the shock has to fill the hose and will cause the air pressure to read 10-20 psi lower than what it actually had inside the shock. If you had it at 80 psi and then reattached the pump it could read as low as 50-60psi.

    I run the 600 lb spring with 90psi in the shock and no propedal. I weigh 190. Feels good for trail riding.

    Also remeber that the air inside the shock has a slight effect on how much sag you get, I think. Mine feels like it sags a bit less with more air.

    If anything, have the shop get you at a safe 100 psi and see if it feels right. There's also the possibility you will need a heavier or lighter spring if the shock feels too soft or too firm when air is in it. If you have to go up to 200 psi then you most def need a heavier spring.

  3. #3
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    So best bet at this point is to just have them add up the psi to 100, and go from there?
    Tarekith.com

    '17 Specialized Enduro Elite 29

  4. #4
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    I've got the same bike. You want to set up the shock to have 25-30% sag. That is, when you are sitting one the bike you want it to be 25-30% into it's travel range. I weigh 140 and have mine at 165 if I remember correctly. This gives me a little less than 25% sag, as I like to hit some bigger jumps on the trail from time to time.

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