My RP3 is "stuck down"- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    My RP3 is "stuck down"

    I've only had the shock for a few weeks, and I'm already having problems with it. Will this be a monthly problem, or can it be permanently fixed?

    I just dropped my bike off at the shop, and the guy said they'd fix it. But I'm pretty sure that the roadie I talked to had no clue, since he said his "shock guy" wasn't going to be in till tomorrow. So if I pick it up and it looks like it's working, should I trust their work enough to take the bike to Moab this Friday? I'd hate to be half way down Porcupine Rim and have to ride the rest of the way with a fully compressed shock. I almost hope they don't know how to fix it so I can get a loaner shock for the weekend.

    You'd think that for the price Fox charges, they would have fixed this bug by now - especially since it appears to be a common problem. By the way, I'm only 140 lbs, so this problem does not only occur to heavyweights

  2. #2
    shaved yeti
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    Well, you got a 50/50 chance. There are two reasons why you'll get stuck down.

    1. The seal between the negative airchamber and the positive chamber is comprimised. You can replace the seals and it's fixed.

    2. The bore of the damper shaft doesn't match up with the rest of the innerds and so oil leaks past the valve. In this case your screwed, and gotta send it back.

    I've had a couple of shocks with the #2 case, and it took a couple of overhauls, before I decided to send it back.

  3. #3
    Do It Yourself
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    Fox suggests in the manual you may be able to pump it up to 250psi fix it. If that doesn't work it will need factory service. They only way you're going to be riding that shock in Moab on Friday is to overnight it today to PUSH Industries for repair and have them overnight it back. Be sure to give them a head up if that's what you want to do.
    Long Live Long Rides

  4. #4
    TNC
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    Bonkey and Homebrew are right.

    Quote Originally Posted by bonkey
    Well, you got a 50/50 chance. There are two reasons why you'll get stuck down.

    1. The seal between the negative airchamber and the positive chamber is comprimised. You can replace the seals and it's fixed.

    2. The bore of the damper shaft doesn't match up with the rest of the innerds and so oil leaks past the valve. In this case your screwed, and gotta send it back.

    I've had a couple of shocks with the #2 case, and it took a couple of overhauls, before I decided to send it back.
    Those are your basic 4 options. My DHX Air for a Bullit got one 15 mile ride before it did a "stick down" the very next morning. I tried the 250 psi deal several times, emptying the main chamber and repressuring...to no avail. I'm familiar with the negative chamber snafu, but I couldn't bring myself to open up my brand new shock for diagnosis and repair...and still not have the needed parts for repair. Having two quality shocks sitting on the shelf to plug into my bike made this an easy decision...let Fox take care of it on their nickel...except for postage of course. Hopefully you still have your OEM shock. That overnight deal is probably your only hope of using your existing shock, though I think you'll be pushing (no pun intended) that time frame.

    You mention your upcoming trip to Moab. This may sound like overkill, but I think that any of us who ride to any great degree or take any road trips to big riding venues like Utah, California, etc. should have a spare rear shock (coil or air) for our bike. On trips like these you can taco a wheel and/or break many other components on your bike, and you can usually find just about anything you need in the area. The front fork, your frame, and rear shock are the biggies. The front fork and frame are usually not as frequent a failure issue, but finding the rear shock can be challenging even if your credit card isn't maxed out. Good luck on your fix...and your trip.

  5. #5
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    Same with my RP3.
    Ive had it 2 weeks. 6 rides. Maybe 50 miles on it.
    Rode it Sunday and it was fine. I remeber this because I ran into a guy towards the end of the ride and he was checking out my bike commenting on how plush it was.
    Went to tuck my bike in last night and noticed that the shaft looked shorter than normal.
    I also tried the 250 PSI inflation but it was no help.
    Got an RA from Fox today. They quoted a 1 week turn around.
    I bought the RP3 for my 5.5 to replace the Swinger 4 Way which I planned to sell.
    Maybe I should keep it for a spare.....

  6. #6
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    I just called the bike shop, and supposedly the shock is working. I didn't get much detail, since the guy I talked to didn't work on it, so it will be interesting to see what they did when I pick it up tonight. The lame part is that I'll be checking out my shock every 5 minutes to see if it's going flat while I'm at Moab - who knows how long it will be before I start trusting the shock again. By the way, I failed to mention that the RP3 is my OEM shock, so if this one fails, I'm screwed.

    It seems like I've heard about a lot of people having this "stuck down" problem lately. Any chance that the colder whether is bringing out the worst in our shocks, i.e., causing the seals to lose their integrity? It was probably 40 degrees if not lower when my shock stuck. Tracer - is it getting pretty cold where you are from?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by slcmtb
    I just called the bike shop, and supposedly the shock is working. I didn't get much detail, since the guy I talked to didn't work on it, so it will be interesting to see what they did when I pick it up tonight. The lame part is that I'll be checking out my shock every 5 minutes to see if it's going flat while I'm at Moab - who knows how long it will be before I start trusting the shock again. By the way, I failed to mention that the RP3 is my OEM shock, so if this one fails, I'm screwed.

    It seems like I've heard about a lot of people having this "stuck down" problem lately. Any chance that the colder whether is bringing out the worst in our shocks, i.e., causing the seals to lose their integrity? It was probably 40 degrees if not lower when my shock stuck. Tracer - is it getting pretty cold where you are from?
    Close to 50 when I rode on Sunday. Mid 40s Monday.
    Ive ridden Floats plenty of times with temps in the teens with no problems.
    I meant to ask the Fox tech what could have caused it but got distracted (at work) and forgot to inquire.
    Years ago on a group ride a friends Float got stuck down. We were camping with no LBS so he made the decision to open it up. Unscrewed the can and BAM! Sounded like a gunshot. Air escaping from the negative chamber I guess. Good thing he had a screwdriver through the rear eyelet.....He lubed up all the internals, reassembled and the shock worked for the remainder of the trip.

  8. #8
    TNC
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    Maybe coincidence, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by slcmtb
    I just called the bike shop, and supposedly the shock is working. I didn't get much detail, since the guy I talked to didn't work on it, so it will be interesting to see what they did when I pick it up tonight. The lame part is that I'll be checking out my shock every 5 minutes to see if it's going flat while I'm at Moab - who knows how long it will be before I start trusting the shock again. By the way, I failed to mention that the RP3 is my OEM shock, so if this one fails, I'm screwed.

    It seems like I've heard about a lot of people having this "stuck down" problem lately. Any chance that the colder whether is bringing out the worst in our shocks, i.e., causing the seals to lose their integrity? It was probably 40 degrees if not lower when my shock stuck. Tracer - is it getting pretty cold where you are from?
    Mine stuck at about 40 degrees. When I had ridden the day before it was about 70. The next morning when I took it out it was fairly cool at 40. Interesting thought. I've used air and coil shocks many, many times in temps less than this, but it makes one wonder that if a new shock has a minor glitch in a part or a clearance issue...who knows.

  9. #9
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    So when I got to the bike shop last night, I was pleased to find out that the guys threw a brand new RP3 on my bike. So I have to give props to Fisher Cyclery in Salt Lake - they've always treated me right.

    The new shock has made me realize that with the RP3, it's really hit or miss. If you happened to have read a thread about a week ago called "Are RP3 settings a gimmick", that was me. My last shock had virtually no noticable difference between the 3 settings. The settings on my new shock are quite noticeable. On my last shock, I had to put about 180 psi in my shock, and it still seemed like there was a little too much sag. On my new shock, my pressure is only at 135, which seems to give me quite a bit more plushness throughout the travel (although I haven't actually been able to go on a real ride with it yet). On my old shock, I would seriously bottom out by rolling off of a 10 inch curb. Not on my new shock. I'm guessing that my old shock has always been partially stuck down, and it just took a while for it to get completely stuck. I would also guess that this may be the reason you hear so many opposing views on the RP3 - because some work, and some don't.

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