Motion E18 Linkage Fork First Impressions and Mini Review.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Motion E18 Linkage Fork First Impressions and Mini Review.

    So, I just got in my second day on the Motion E18. First was riding smoothish, slightly flowing trails with poorly designed berms that tend to not have proper exits and easy rock gardens. Second day was on the St. Louis DH. This lower section is super rough, with nasty, jagged, steep, lava drops that I thought would really test the fork. I wasn't wrong.

    Full Disclosure: I got in touch with Motion before their fork was even for sale. I thought it looked like a really good design that addressed some issues that I was having with my RS Pike. I paid full price once they went on sale and then ordered a second one when they opened up the 20% off ambassador program. The first is on a 2017 YT Jeffsy CF One, replacing the RS Pike RCT3 150mm with a Motion E18 160mm. The second is going on a 2018 Knolly Delirium (it hasn't shipped yet) with a 188mm travel CCDB CS Coil in the rear and replacing a 170mm MRP Ribbon.

    Me: I rode all through my younger years in HS and college back in the last century. Took 20 something years off and recently got back into the MTB game. It's even better than I remember. I'm reasonably good technically, really bad cardioly, and I'm learning to hit bigger jumps although gaps still scare me because consequences. But I did just case the hardest I ever have today (not my fault, the trail builders have been doing mad work lately and they increased the gap by a foot and a half.) and it was no big deal, so I'm getting better and more confident.

    So, the claims:

    1. Anti Dive. It's called the Motion anti dive fork. This is completely legit. I never realized before how much brake dive contributed to how I rode. I know you're not supposed to brake through the corners, but when they're really steep and the berm ends before the corner does you just have to brake. Brake dive loads up the front end, compresses the fork, reduces the available travel, and reduces traction. After I put the E18 on I realized how much I was using body movement to combat the effects of brake dive and how much it reduced traction. Today, well, no brake dive and having full travel and sensitivity through the corner is really cool.

    The second part, and where St. Louis really shines (or bites) is steep, technical, rock drops, where you have to be hard on the brakes, going down a steep face, with lots of lava boulders strewn about. After the first couple drops I quit worrying about my line. At all. Where the pike would be really compressed due to braking and I'd be sitting in the back seat avoiding the rocks, I just went straight. Having full travel and not worrying about getting pitched over the bars is glorious. I'm sold.

    2. Axle path. Less to say about this, but it's still really cool and definitely a noticeable improvement over a stick fork. Due to the increased confidence I was pretty much just rampaging a trail that I hadn't ridden in 6 months. I missed a lot of the rock "rolls" and turned them into drops. And didn't crash. Going off 2 foot drops and expecting a rollout rock only to find it a foot to the left led to several nose heavy landings. Ones that would definitely have pitched me over the bars on the Pike. I could definitely feel, just at the point where I expected the nose to tuck under, the axle path go vertical and stay on track, out front, and stable. F'n cool. And not bloodied by lava.

    3. Stiction/suppleness. One of the main gripes I have with both the Pike and the Ribbon is the stiction and lack of small bump absorbtion. I'm old and riding chattery crap hurts after a while. I feel like, and other reports indicate, that stick forks up the low speed compression dampening to deal with brake dive. Between that and stiction riding chattery rocks and roots doesn't really get mitigated much.

    With the E18 there is no stiction. Also, because it doesn't have to deal with damping out brake dive, it can use less LS compression.

    I ran one click faster on the rebound side on the Ohana trail, which is generally pretty smooth, and it felt good. On St. Louis I tried that same setting and it felt good, but I seemed to be using up too much of my travel on small 1-2 foot drops. It was butter smooth, but
    I felt like I was getting too far into the travel to deal with bigger hits. I tried 2 clicks into the compression/rebound side but it seemed to be too chattery over 4-6" roots so I set it on 1 click into C/R side and was pretty happy. Keep in mind that I weigh 95kg, so I think most riders will be pretty just messing about on the rebound side untill they hit the park and need the additional compression for big jumps.

    4. Stiffness. It's stiff. The thing doesn't ****ing move. It surprised the hell out of me the first time I racked it up in my 1Up. The Pike flexes an inch or three. The E18 moved a half inch and stopped. It doesn't move sideways either.

    5. "Maintenance Free" Who knows? I have 2 rides on it. But Motion has 100,000 km on one of their early forks with no wobble or wear, so I'm inclined to believe it will outlast the next couple frames I buy.

    6. Price. Yeah, it costs. But it really is a better fork design (I feel after riding it) and if the "no maintenance" claims hold up, it will be cheaper in the long run than a Fox 36 with 3-4 rebuilds on it.

    7. Looks. Some like, some hate. (Online) But everyone I've run into on the trail has been universally, "Holy shit, that thing is cool." And then you spend 10 minutes talking to a new riding buddy.


    SO: On to the downsides. (There really aren't any)

    Seriously. The only thing that kind of niggled me about this fork was the lack of a proper top-out bumper of some sort. Everyone likes a silentish ride and when I got into high speed running over 4-6" roots the fork starts to rattle. Not because anything is loose, it isn't, but because it likes to ride high in the travel, and it gives a little clunk when it tops out. A bit of elastomer would be a nice addition there.

    Independently adjustable HS/LS rebound and compression would be nice. But the system they have is really good for 95% of riders. I'm just a suspension geek, although not really a good enough rider to do anything with it.

    And, obviously, swappable blade spring curves. What they have really will work for 95% of the riders out there, but because interwebz, having a half dozen different springs for different riders on different terrains would be helpful.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunniBoi View Post
    So, I just got in my second day on the Motion E18. First was riding smoothish, slightly flowing trails with poorly designed berms that tend to not have proper exits and easy rock gardens. Second day was on the St. Louis DH. This lower section is super rough, with nasty, jagged, steep, lava drops that I thought would really test the fork. I wasn't wrong.

    Full Disclosure: I got in touch with Motion before their fork was even for sale. I thought it looked like a really good design that addressed some issues that I was having with my RS Pike. I paid full price once they went on sale and then ordered a second one when they opened up the 20% off ambassador program. The first is on a 2017 YT Jeffsy CF One, replacing the RS Pike RCT3 150mm with a Motion E18 160mm. The second is going on a 2018 Knolly Delirium (it hasn't shipped yet) with a 188mm travel CCDB CS Coil in the rear and replacing a 170mm MRP Ribbon.

    Me: I rode all through my younger years in HS and college back in the last century. Took 20 something years off and recently got back into the MTB game. It's even better than I remember. I'm reasonably good technically, really bad cardioly, and I'm learning to hit bigger jumps although gaps still scare me because consequences. But I did just case the hardest I ever have today (not my fault, the trail builders have been doing mad work lately and they increased the gap by a foot and a half.) and it was no big deal, so I'm getting better and more confident.

    So, the claims:

    1. Anti Dive. It's called the Motion anti dive fork. This is completely legit. I never realized before how much brake dive contributed to how I rode. I know you're not supposed to brake through the corners, but when they're really steep and the berm ends before the corner does you just have to brake. Brake dive loads up the front end, compresses the fork, reduces the available travel, and reduces traction. After I put the E18 on I realized how much I was using body movement to combat the effects of brake dive and how much it reduced traction. Today, well, no brake dive and having full travel and sensitivity through the corner is really cool.

    The second part, and where St. Louis really shines (or bites) is steep, technical, rock drops, where you have to be hard on the brakes, going down a steep face, with lots of lava boulders strewn about. After the first couple drops I quit worrying about my line. At all. Where the pike would be really compressed due to braking and I'd be sitting in the back seat avoiding the rocks, I just went straight. Having full travel and not worrying about getting pitched over the bars is glorious. I'm sold.

    2. Axle path. Less to say about this, but it's still really cool and definitely a noticeable improvement over a stick fork. Due to the increased confidence I was pretty much just rampaging a trail that I hadn't ridden in 6 months. I missed a lot of the rock "rolls" and turned them into drops. And didn't crash. Going off 2 foot drops and expecting a rollout rock only to find it a foot to the left led to several nose heavy landings. Ones that would definitely have pitched me over the bars on the Pike. I could definitely feel, just at the point where I expected the nose to tuck under, the axle path go vertical and stay on track, out front, and stable. F'n cool. And not bloodied by lava.

    3. Stiction/suppleness. One of the main gripes I have with both the Pike and the Ribbon is the stiction and lack of small bump absorbtion. I'm old and riding chattery crap hurts after a while. I feel like, and other reports indicate, that stick forks up the low speed compression dampening to deal with brake dive. Between that and stiction riding chattery rocks and roots doesn't really get mitigated much.

    With the E18 there is no stiction. Also, because it doesn't have to deal with damping out brake dive, it can use less LS compression.

    I ran one click faster on the rebound side on the Ohana trail, which is generally pretty smooth, and it felt good. On St. Louis I tried that same setting and it felt good, but I seemed to be using up too much of my travel on small 1-2 foot drops. It was butter smooth, but
    I felt like I was getting too far into the travel to deal with bigger hits. I tried 2 clicks into the compression/rebound side but it seemed to be too chattery over 4-6" roots so I set it on 1 click into C/R side and was pretty happy. Keep in mind that I weigh 95kg, so I think most riders will be pretty just messing about on the rebound side untill they hit the park and need the additional compression for big jumps.

    4. Stiffness. It's stiff. The thing doesn't ****ing move. It surprised the hell out of me the first time I racked it up in my 1Up. The Pike flexes an inch or three. The E18 moved a half inch and stopped. It doesn't move sideways either.

    5. "Maintenance Free" Who knows? I have 2 rides on it. But Motion has 100,000 km on one of their early forks with no wobble or wear, so I'm inclined to believe it will outlast the next couple frames I buy.

    6. Price. Yeah, it costs. But it really is a better fork design (I feel after riding it) and if the "no maintenance" claims hold up, it will be cheaper in the long run than a Fox 36 with 3-4 rebuilds on it.

    7. Looks. Some like, some hate. (Online) But everyone I've run into on the trail has been universally, "Holy shit, that thing is cool." And then you spend 10 minutes talking to a new riding buddy.


    SO: On to the downsides. (There really aren't any)

    Seriously. The only thing that kind of niggled me about this fork was the lack of a proper top-out bumper of some sort. Everyone likes a silentish ride and when I got into high speed running over 4-6" roots the fork starts to rattle. Not because anything is loose, it isn't, but because it likes to ride high in the travel, and it gives a little clunk when it tops out. A bit of elastomer would be a nice addition there.

    Independently adjustable HS/LS rebound and compression would be nice. But the system they have is really good for 95% of riders. I'm just a suspension geek, although not really a good enough rider to do anything with it.

    And, obviously, swappable blade spring curves. What they have really will work for 95% of the riders out there, but because interwebz, having a half dozen different springs for different riders on different terrains would be helpful.
    Nice! Thanks for the review. Sounds like it basically performs as it was supposed to. Do you know how much it weighs relative to the other forks?

    It will be interesting to see if end up adjusting you riding style substantially over the next few months. Seems like as much good/bad press the Trust fork got, it may come down to forgetting some old habits and learning to utilize the new forks....but from the sounds of it, you were able to slip right onto this without much adjustment.

    Got any pics?

  3. #3
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    Weight is 2.1 kg. Basically the same as a Fox 36 or similar.

    Pix from today:

    https://imgur.com/a/pjyDNVZ

    https://imgur.com/gallery/rQfNETB


    LOL, I've already adjusted my riding style. 2 clicks toward "just send it". (Keep in mind that I'm an old guy)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunniBoi View Post
    Weight is 2.1 kg. Basically the same as a Fox 36 or similar.

    Pix from today:

    https://imgur.com/a/pjyDNVZ

    https://imgur.com/gallery/rQfNETB
    Cool - looks RAD!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunniBoi View Post

    LOL, I've already adjusted my riding style. 2 clicks toward "just send it". (Keep in mind that I'm an old guy)
    Maybe someday :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIrWyr3HgXI

  6. #6
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    "Nuther day, nuther beer." yeah, pretty much that.

  7. #7
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    Man, this looks awful! Sorry, had to say that. But happy for you that you like it

  8. #8
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    You mean "Awe Full", right? As in "Full of Awe(some)".

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    I wish. To me it looks terrible, but hopefully it works opposite to it

  10. #10
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    How is it hucking to flat? The Trust reviews suggest that landings are harsh, wondering if this is the case with all linkage forks.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunniBoi View Post
    You mean "Awe Full", right? As in "Full of Awe(some)".
    Full of awesome...it's rad, for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by half_man_half_scab View Post
    How is it hucking to flat? The Trust reviews suggest that landings are harsh, wondering if this is the case with all linkage forks.
    It isn't harsh at all, super plush, in fact. I initially was riding it in the "trail" mode, open compression dampening and 1 click faster rebound, and although it felt good in the chatter I felt like I was using too much of the travel on ~2 foot drops to flat. They felt good, but I thought anything bigger could maybe bottom out. So I turned the damper over to 1 click into the "park" side of things, which adds a bit more compression and it felt great. Still very smooth on the landings, but more absorbtion throughout the whole stroke rather than using the progressivity at the end.

  13. #13
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    Cool. I wonder if they could come up with an "add-a-leaf" system for heavier riders. It'd be cool if it could clip on.

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    In the manual it says the springs are replaceable and I recall reading somewhere that they plan on coming up with a few different ones down the road. But the stock one works from 50-100kg or so. I'm 95kg and don't have it maxed out.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the report. Very interesting!

  16. #16
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    Nice work. Thanks for sharing.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  17. #17
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    Flippen nice review. I'm sold. Motion can thank you later.

  18. #18
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    Hey, just checking for any further impressions since you've had it a couple weeks now, any updates or thought changes?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

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    Not really, been working so I only have 2 more rides on it. I'm noticing that I have a lot more grip on the front end (either that more faith in my grip) so I can comfortably push harder through the corners. I finally successfully hit a 3-4 foot rock drop to flatish that I crashed on previously and it felt really good and stable on landing. Last time I hit it the front end washed out (Pike) and this time everything felt super plush and stable. The drop pretty much just disappeared. May or may not be attributable to the fork, though. I don't have enough experience on drops to definitively say. But, all in all, I'm still loving it.

    I have a 170mm version coming too for my Knolly, but depending on the arrival timing I may give it to a friend to run on his Capra for a couple weeks. He's a MUCH better rider than I am so should be able to provide more input. But that depends on when it arrives.

  20. #20
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    Thanks OP for your review . I found this review on YouTube : well detailed with good camera angles and technical trail riding. Also I like how the rider pointed the good the bad and the ugly without sugar coating.

    The rider on this video claim some lateral flex on steep terrain or under heavy braking . also some sort of stiction after sometime riding in the European winter.

    Even with that he says the suspension inspire confidence and tons of traction!

    bunniboi do you agree or felt anything like it?

    I always liked linkage front suspensions since the AMP/Girvin days. Now with better material , design and technology we could be seeing a new gen of front suspension and designs. Just like full suspensions bikes 20 years ago.

    The looks of it reminds me the terminator arm without its skin, So robotic.. I'm digging it! I think the Insurgent needs one



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fov7XPtuesc
    Last edited by pvflyer; 02-09-2019 at 11:01 PM.
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvflyer View Post
    Thanks OP for your review . I found this review on YouTube : well detailed with good camera angles and technical trail riding. Also I like how the rider pointed the good the bad and the ugly without sugar coating.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fov7XPtuesc
    Very worth watching. Thanks for the link.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvflyer View Post
    The rider on this video claim some lateral flex on steep terrain or under heavy braking . also some sort of stiction after sometime riding in the European winter.

    Even with that he says the suspension inspire confidence and tons of traction!

    bunniboi do you agree or felt anything like it?
    Great video, thanks for pointing it out. One thing to note is he mentioned he had a pre-production model. I have the first run production model so there may be some differences.

    As for the lateral flex, no. I watched his video of the flex test and went down and reefed sideways on the bars as hard as I could. Currently weighing in at 195lbs the only thing flexing was the bar and stem. Maybe a bit in the wheel, but I really couldn't see any fork flex below the headset.

    Stiction. I haven't noticed any, but I also don't ride in the Scottish muck. Mine is still super sensitive. I thought it interesting that he said they were going to all sealed bearings. I'm 99% sure I have the bushings in the front pivots and bearings on the ends of the rear stabilizer bar. It looks like it on mine and Xavier told me that's what they did on the production model.

    The other negatives he mentioned are pretty minor IMO. Price, yeah, it's steep. But It's new, boutique, and hopefully longer lasting. I think the costs will equalize over time. No front QR, LOL, get yourself a 1up rack. Personally, I like not having a hook hanging off my front wheel and don't have an issue digging out the hex on those odd occasions when I have to remove the wheel. Lack of tuning. Yeah, that's a plus and minus like he mentioned. I like having a ton of tuning options to get my suspension to feel just right, but in this case I really haven't felt the need to mess with it. I went one click into "park" and it feels really good. I haven't felt the need to mess with it further.

    And, like he said at the end, the negatives a SO minor when compared to the increase in front grip that they pretty much just disappear. It's also the first iteration of their product. They definite hit a home run on the first try and with a couple refinements it's going out of the park.

  23. #23
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    Good video. It's hard to review a new fork in the cold, it just messes with everything.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunniBoi View Post
    As for the lateral flex, no. I watched his video of the flex test and went down and reefed sideways on the bars as hard as I could. Currently weighing in at 195lbs the only thing flexing was the bar and stem. Maybe a bit in the wheel, but I really couldn't see any fork flex below the headset.

    Stiction. I haven't noticed any, but I also don't ride in the Scottish muck. Mine is still super sensitive. I thought it interesting that he said they were going to all sealed bearings. I'm 99% sure I have the bushings in the front pivots and bearings on the ends of the rear stabilizer bar. It looks like it on mine and Xavier told me that's what they did on the production model.

    I like having a ton of tuning options to get my suspension to feel just right, but in this case I really haven't felt the need to mess with it. I went one click into "park" and it feels really good.

    It's also the first iteration of their product. They definite hit a home run on the first try and with a couple refinements it's going out of the park.
    Yeah , I think he was a bit pickier with some of his complaints. My concern was the flex more than anything. (Don't use and don't like QR's I'd replace my QR with a TA on all my forks) you need to pay to play, nothing on the high end bike world is cheap. I was wonder when the decision to change from bushings to bearings were made cause on their webpage it still described as bushings. I am glad some company's are thinking out of the box and moving us toward the 21th century suspension design.

    Thanks for the reply & review

    Quote Originally Posted by Harryman View Post
    Good video. It's hard to review a new fork in the cold, it just messes with everything.
    Yeap.. welcome to Scotland. Even though the conditions were appalling, the fork looked and behaved pretty good. I liked that little muddy steep off camber section when the woods got dark. It looks pretty technical and slippery but he had some good traction riding it, no prob.
    Last edited by pvflyer; 02-10-2019 at 01:08 AM.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris2fur View Post
    Very worth watching. Thanks for the link.
    "My GREATEST FEAR is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."

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    Consistency in cold weather is probably one of this fork's strong point compared to stick forks. Less seals, less reliance on oil damping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pvflyer View Post
    I was wonder when the decision to change from bushings to bearings were made cause on their webpage it still described as bushings.
    I think Ali was somewhat mistaken on that point. The main pivots are still bushings. Only the ends of that little stabilizer bar at the back were switched out to bearings.

    This is from Xavier:
    For maintenance free, we do not claim it anymore. Actually, we prefer to have the best fork behaviour on the market than being 100% maintenance free.
    Thus, we decided to change some bushings by bearings. This is better for sensitivity.
    On the link at the back of the fork, on the 2 axles you have bearings. We still have bushings on the 2 front axles of the fork.

    We will see in the the time how it goes. For the moment, no problem.
    Probably because, like Ali mentioned, it was too difficult to get perfect alignment and there would have been a bit of binding. Maybe that's what he was calling stiction?

    Quote Originally Posted by romphaia View Post
    Consistency in cold weather is probably one of this fork's strong point compared to stick forks. Less seals, less reliance on oil damping.

    Correct, the leaf and pivots should be relatively unaffected by temperature. The damper oil would probably thicken up a touch, but nowhere near as much as a stick fork.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunniBoi View Post
    ...The damper oil would probably thicken up a touch, but nowhere near as much as a stick fork.
    What would be the explanation for that?
    Do the math.

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    Sorry, wrong term. The oil would react the same to temperature, but it should have less effect on the behavior of the fork. It only damps motion, in a stick fork it also lubes the seals (and there's significantly more of it) and temperature also pretty drastically affects the way the air cartridge behaves.

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    Hey, Ali here!

    Just wanted to clear up the bearing thing. This is a quote from Xavier from an email he sent me after my unboxing video:

    ďNote that we have decided to make a design modification for the E18+ fork that will be delivered end of March and which is intended to 29er and 27.5+.

    Actually, the bushings we have on E18 are very difficult for industrialisation because we need to ream them in position precisely and it depends of the axles we have on which we have tolerances for manufacturing.

    On few series, it is ok but for mass production it is a nightmare and in some cases we have faced forks which are loosing sensitivity. ☹

    Thus, we have decided to go for ball bearings on all axles. On the current fork you have there are ball bearings on the link at the back of the fork. You still have the bushings on the 2 front axles.

    Clearly, people will yell about maintenanceÖ but the most important for us is performance. We have now a service center with Upgrade bikes in UK (not yet official) so no worries service will be handle by professionals in your area.Ē

    So it seems like itís only going to be the plus model fork thatís getting the new bearings for now, I suspect thatíll roll onto the standard forks in the future but thatís just guess work, either way theyíve asked for my forks to be sent back so they can fit bearings instead of the bushings I currently have.

  31. #31
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    Welcome to the forum

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali Clarkson View Post
    Hey, Ali here!
    Look who the cat dragged in! Welcome to the Forum and great YouTube channel.
    Keep on videoing
    Last edited by pvflyer; 02-10-2019 at 05:33 PM.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ali Clarkson View Post
    Hey, Ali here!

    Just wanted to clear up the bearing thing. This is a quote from Xavier from an email he sent me after my unboxing video:

    ďNote that we have decided to make a design modification for the E18+ fork that will be delivered end of March and which is intended to 29er and 27.5+.

    Actually, the bushings we have on E18 are very difficult for industrialisation because we need to ream them in position precisely and it depends of the axles we have on which we have tolerances for manufacturing.

    On few series, it is ok but for mass production it is a nightmare and in some cases we have faced forks which are loosing sensitivity. ☹

    Thus, we have decided to go for ball bearings on all axles. On the current fork you have there are ball bearings on the link at the back of the fork. You still have the bushings on the 2 front axles.

    Clearly, people will yell about maintenanceÖ but the most important for us is performance. We have now a service center with Upgrade bikes in UK (not yet official) so no worries service will be handle by professionals in your area.Ē

    So it seems like itís only going to be the plus model fork thatís getting the new bearings for now, I suspect thatíll roll onto the standard forks in the future but thatís just guess work, either way theyíve asked for my forks to be sent back so they can fit bearings instead of the bushings I currently have.
    I would be surprised if it did not end up applying to all of their forks. The type of bushing fit they were looking for basically amounts to 0 +/- tolerances, or essentially, a custom fit on each fork. It's just not practical to mass produce any item that way.

  33. #33
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    Just got my E18 150 fork thurs and got it installed and have 2 rides on it. This is going to be mostly a cons list because of the price, one should be picky.

    Cons
    Steerer tube is shorter than my fox 34 and without cutting it i had to remove a 5mm spacer

    Had a small spot on chassis that black anodizing hit. Motion ride told me that was due to the tool that is used to place the chassis in anodizing tank.

    Says max tire size is 2.5Ö. Well my 2.5 WTB Vigilante started to buzz with cornering in my parking lot. So I had to put on a 2.3 Vigilante.

    Manual is quite lacking. Should have base tune for body weight. My fox manual was pretty much spot on for rebound setting to weight verified by shock wiz. Would prefer separate rebound and compression adjustments.

    One size fits all spring, not so much. I am 195 kitted up or 88.5kg and I had max preload on the spring and had more than the recommended 30% Sag and bottomed out with 2ish foot drops and small jumps. Although I never felt it bottom out, I could only tell by the o ring on the damper. No HS compression to help. The compression on damper only adjusts low speed compression as per Motion Ride.

    Pros
    The vertical axle path on second half of travel helps with poorly executed drops and the anti dive works as advertised. Stayed higher up in travel while braking.
    Absorbed square edged hits better than my Fox 34. Very plush and tracked ground well. Most confident fork I have felt while jumping. I donít get much air so Iím sure if I went bigger the lack of higher spring rate would be quite apparent. The company is very communicative and care greatly about rider feedback. Yeah it looks like a god damn alien, but everyone at the bike park was asking about it. Plus or minus if you like the attention.

  34. #34
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    W00T! Number two just showed up! A 170mm in blue. Time to kit up the Delirium!


    https://imgur.com/a/46f4SKf

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamkam View Post
    Steerer tube is shorter than my fox 34 and without cutting it i had to remove a 5mm spacer
    Interesting, what bike? And what's your spacer setup? Got a pic? I had to cut about an inch or so for my Jeffsy.

    Had a small spot on chassis that black anodizing hit. Motion ride told me that was due to the tool that is used to place the chassis in anodizing tank.
    Where is it? I looked briefly and don't see any blemishes on mine. I can see it being an irritation given the price, but I really don't care given how much I ding the crap out of my bike during general riding.

    Says max tire size is 2.5Ö. Well my 2.5 WTB Vigilante started to buzz with cornering in my parking lot. So I had to put on a 2.3 Vigilante.
    This is a problem with your tire, not Motions specs. I'm in a similar boat, I have a 2.35 Magic Mary on mine and it fits with what I'd consider minimum safe clearance, but the width of the tire actually mics out a 2.460". So Motion is entirely correct that a 2.5" tire will fit.

    Manual is quite lacking. Should have base tune for body weight. My fox manual was pretty much spot on for rebound setting to weight verified by shock wiz. Would prefer separate rebound and compression adjustments.
    Yeah, as I mentioned above, more tunability would be nice. I expect that to come on the next iteration of the damper. Have you put your shock-wix on the E18? That would be super cool to see how it handled the different design.

    One size fits all spring, not so much. I am 195 kitted up or 88.5kg and I had max preload on the spring and had more than the recommended 30% Sag and bottomed out with 2ish foot drops and small jumps. Although I never felt it bottom out, I could only tell by the o ring on the damper. No HS compression to help. The compression on damper only adjusts low speed compression as per Motion Ride.
    I wonder about this too. I'm about your weight and I have my 160 cranked full stiff. I haven't measured sag yet because it is kind of a PITA but it looks to be about 30%. And, like you, after some 3-4 foot drops I'm showing full or nearly full travel on the fork, but I never feel it bottom out. I need to do more drops, but I think this could be a good thing. I need to hand it off to a better rider than be to really test it on big hits.



    The vertical axle path on second half of travel helps with poorly executed drops and the anti dive works as advertised. Stayed higher up in travel while braking.
    Absorbed square edged hits better than my Fox 34. Very plush and tracked ground well. Most confident fork I have felt while jumping. I donít get much air so Iím sure if I went bigger the lack of higher spring rate would be quite apparent. The company is very communicative and care greatly about rider feedback. Yeah it looks like a god damn alien, but everyone at the bike park was asking about it. Plus or minus if you like the attention.
    Yeah, all this.

  36. #36
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    On a 2018 whyte t130. Upped travel from 130 to 150. but with recommended sag axle to crown length is within a few mm of the fox so geometry should be relatively unchanged.

    Shock wiz cant go on E18 since it doesn't have an air chamber, but was super helpful into showing what I feel vs adjustments so I feel like I have a decent handle on what rebound, lsc, and hsc should feel like.

    I don't really blame motion for the tire clearance, but some of my impressions are off since I had to change to a less aggressive tire. I'm probably going to take a dremel to remove a few mm off the chassis to clear the corner knobs. Its pretty beefy in that corner and don't think it will impact the strength of the chassis.

    Honestly the damper felt pretty damn good. Just wish I had more spring rate or maybe HSC to compensate, although HSC is not ideal to make up for lack of spring. I have to say again that I never felt a bottom out, just see it on the o ring of damper.

    Also had to get clarification on setting sag, since the manual was lacking. Attached is a pic of how I tried to set it and motion gave me a thumbs up. O ring actually sits quite a bit higher in attack position.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motion E18 Linkage Fork First Impressions and Mini Review.-unpainted-fork.jpg  

    Motion E18 Linkage Fork First Impressions and Mini Review.-20190226_215500.jpg  

    Motion E18 Linkage Fork First Impressions and Mini Review.-20190221_212610.jpg  


  37. #37
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    Pic 1: OK, interesting. I see that blemish. Neither of my forks have that. Not something I'd worry about, but I see your point.

    Pic 2: That is a crazy stack height. Like, seriously abnormal. Can't really fault Motion for not catering to the extreme. Most people are running something like half those spacers or less.

    Pic 3: You can't really measure sag like that. I mean, you can, but the O-ring will disappear 1-3mm below the lip of the housing so you have to account for that when you're measuring the zero level. Also the damper has a 1:4 motion ratio, so 1mm of o-ring movement = 4mm of fork movement (IIRC). I know Motion recommends doing it like that, but it's inherently much less accurate than just picking 2 spots on the fork and having a friend measure the sag.

  38. #38
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    So for blemish, I'm not too concerned. The fork will be scratched up soon from all the rocks in central tx, but shouldn't come from the factory like that at this price point.

    The stack height is on the higher side. Thats how the manufacturer designed it. If I run less spacers than I have a hunched over xc racer look with my bars well below my saddle. I am 6'2''. Just pointing out the difference compared to my Fox that had a longer steerer tube.

    Yeah the sag measurement seemed weird to me and thats why I emailed motion. Was trying to figure out how to measure the o ring to base within that little cage. Tried using a toothpick with a 12mm pen mark on it to base and had to put wave in min to get that.

    Either way, we both can agree that the fork rides pretty damn well, and that we both max out the spring at well under their max weight range. A stiffer wave should be on their priority list.

  39. #39
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    Got some more ride time on my E18. After adjusting to the different tire, it rides pretty natural. Even though it looks alien, it just performs very familiar. Better bump compliance all around compared to my Fox 34.

    I noticed that I'm not weighting the front tire enough on corners. Probably from keeping weight back to compensate for past brake dive while scrubbing speed.

    Did it make me faster? Who knows? I'm not consistent enough to know for sure. Got some pr's mixed with 2nd or 3rd on familiar trails on Strava. But my skills have gotten alot better recently after a few visits to a lift access bike park.

  40. #40
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    OK, minor update. I have to say Motion's customer service is awesome. I noticed that my damper adjusting collar was a little slippery and found a *tiny* bit of oil seepage. I emailed them and they immediately got back to me that they had initially undersized the seal. Send it back and they'd fix it. I mentioned that I really didn't want to be without a bike for 2 weeks and they decided to send me a new damper and I'd just swap them out and return the old one. Good deal! Even better. I had mentioned during the exchange that I thought it might need a little more HSC and they said they'd throw on a different tune to try out.

    Motion is a young company and I fully understand that there are going to be glitches in a new product, but they're definitely doing things right and taking care of their customers.

    Now to get more riding in!

  41. #41
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    I wanted to weigh in on this fork as I was able to take it out for a demo ride at sea along with the trust fork.
    First off this is a good fork. It does what you expect a fork to do when you expect it to do it. It was stiff, controlled and handle very much like a conventional fork. The single spring rate doesn't work for riders outside the weight range. Max preload made for a fork that topped out and was too soft threw the rest of the stroke.
    Fork had similar bob while pedaling, although the soft spring didn't help. I wasn't able to test brake dive as my front brake failed half way into the loop.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  42. #42
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    Had a AMP F4 fork and absolutely loved the action. Still ride a 26" Moots Zirkel with a Rohloff hub, and at 5' tall don't want to upgrade to a 27.5. Would definitely go with a Motion, but wouldn't
    the geometry be way out of whack....?
    Tread killer....

  43. #43
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    Any back to back reviews with a Trust?

    What's the clearance on the plus fork?

    Is there an offset option? Does the change in trail adjust for offset change on a telescoping fork?
    For Sale: XMed GG Smash Frameset +
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  44. #44
    Ride Fast Take Chances :)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Any back to back reviews with a Trust?

    What's the clearance on the plus fork?

    Is there an offset option? Does the change in trail adjust for offset change on a telescoping fork?
    I rode both last weekend. E18 was a viable fork, trust was not. No options with the trust fork. Motion has a couple different options depending on what your looking for.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexbn921 View Post
    I wanted to weigh in on this fork as I was able to take it out for a demo ride at sea along with the trust fork.
    First off this is a good fork. It does what you expect a fork to do when you expect it to do it. It was stiff, controlled and handle very much like a conventional fork. The single spring rate doesn't work for riders outside the weight range. Max preload made for a fork that topped out and was too soft threw the rest of the stroke.
    Fork had similar bob while pedaling, although the soft spring didn't help. I wasn't able to test brake dive as my front brake failed half way into the loop.
    Cool, thanks for your impressions. I do agree that they're going to need to offer multiple spring weights in the future. I'm right at the top of the weight range and, although the spring works OK for me, it would be pretty soft if I hit big jumps and, ideally, it would be stiffer with more ramp.

    I sent my 160mm back to Motion. They wanted to replace the bushings with bearings for better sensitivity and update the damper curves. It's on its way back to me now, so I'll post up if there are any noticeable changes on the updated version.

  46. #46
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    Thinking about using the 27.5 150mm on my 26" Moots Zirkel, with 120mm Fox RLC FIT 32. Axle to crown would change from 491 to 545mm. Stock with 70.4 degree HA. might use a +2 degree HA to keep above 69 degree HD.....would this be too wacky for the geometry? BB would change in height by 24.8mm Had a AMP F-4 and love it, wanted a German Kilo, but this Motion is what I want....Rohloff Hub
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motion E18 Linkage Fork First Impressions and Mini Review.-my-photos-226.jpg  

    Tread killer....

  47. #47
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    You are far better off with a new bike. Your bike will handle like crap. It will probably be ok at smashing in a straight line, but crap at everything else. With the taller front end, you will struggle to keep front end from lifting on climbs and weighting the front end enough in corners.

  48. #48
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    ^^Yeah, that. 54mm is WAY too much to add to a fork. I added 10mm and it was great on my Jeffsy. Swapped out to a 170 (+20mm over the stock 150 travel) and it's too much. Decent down hill, but I'm constantly lifting the front end on climbs and, even when I can keep it down the front is really "floppy". The contact patch has moved too far back on the tire and it just doesn't climb well.

    Fortunately my 160mm is back on the bike with new bearings and a (hopefully) better tune on the damper. Sprained my ankle, so no riding for a bit, but I'll post an addendum to the review when I get a few laps on it.

  49. #49
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    Well E-18 won't work anyway....going with German Kilo....don't need more travel, just never got use to a telescopic fork. Never like them, my old AMP F-4 spoiled me back in the day.....
    Tread killer....

  50. #50
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    Are they still offering the 20% off Ambassador program? I canít figure out how to opt in.
    After Trust drops their MSRP under $2000 USD, hopefully Motion has a discount available for early adopters.

  51. #51
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    I'm pretty sure the ambassador program is over. They're well into production mode now. If you're interested PM me and you can get Ä200 off. Not much, but it covers shipping.

  52. #52
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    That's a fantastic comparison on the forks. To me, I feel MRP coil has edged the linkage fork by a small margin. MRP looks just a bit more composed in taking successive hits.

  54. #54
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    Whatís the eye to eye of that thru shaft damper?

    Why not adapt something like a Cane Creek inline coil shock (minus the coil) or Fox DHX2 with full LSC/HSC/LSR/HSR adjustments as the main damper.


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  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwzimmer View Post
    Whatís the eye to eye of that thru shaft damper?

    Why not adapt something like a Cane Creek inline coil shock (minus the coil) or Fox DHX2 with full LSC/HSC/LSR/HSR adjustments as the main damper.
    It's a pull shock. It's not an easy adaption.

  56. #56
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    Sent my fork in for the bushing swap to bearings. Thought I was getting a firmer damper tune as well.

    The fork went through it's travel too easily before service and now it's even worse. I am 195ish in riding gear. I go through 150 mm just doing small bunny hops.

    Motion has been prompt in communication and truly seem to care and remedy the issue. At the moment I am arranging to send in my damper for more hsc although I feel like I might end up with and over damped undersprung fork.

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