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  1. #1
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    Marzocchi Lower-End Forks

    Hi I have some questions. I know threads like this are cliche but hear me out. Also you can't search 2 or 3 letter words so I have to ask.

    1) the MZ comp fork? I know they're OEM and 100mm of coil travel.

    2)Bomber EXR Pro fork? This looks really good for the money and has 105mm travel.

    3)MX Pro ETA fork, I know this is probably the best of the 3 I'm mentioning but also costs the most. The preload adjustment on this coil fork is air. I wouldn't think the air-preload would take as much abuse as an air-spring so would it be less prone to leaking (I'm coming off a noleen mega-air....)?

    I'm not sure what the stantion sizes are on these forks but that's not so much of a concern for me. More so I'm wanting to know about the quality and longivity I can get out of them as well as weight if any of them are "too" heavy.

    Thanks
    Kona Coiler

  2. #2
    MK_
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    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    Hi I have some questions. I know threads like this are cliche but hear me out. Also you can't search 2 or 3 letter words so I have to ask.

    1) the MZ comp fork? I know they're OEM and 100mm of coil travel.

    2)Bomber EXR Pro fork? This looks really good for the money and has 105mm travel.

    3)MX Pro ETA fork, I know this is probably the best of the 3 I'm mentioning but also costs the most. The preload adjustment on this coil fork is air. I wouldn't think the air-preload would take as much abuse as an air-spring so would it be less prone to leaking (I'm coming off a noleen mega-air....)?

    I'm not sure what the stantion sizes are on these forks but that's not so much of a concern for me. More so I'm wanting to know about the quality and longivity I can get out of them as well as weight if any of them are "too" heavy.

    Thanks
    Of the 3 forks you've named, I think only the MX Pro is made by Marzocchi. The other two, although they bear the Marzocchi name, are made by Suntour. MZ has elastomers and coils, no damping circuitry. EXR is not unlike the MX, except some damping elements are plastic. The chasis is heavier, also. Although it bears very similar dimensions, the materials used are cheaper. An alternative to MX pro is MX comp which sould be about $50 less and is just as good. All it is missing is external rebound adjustment. Air preload is very durable.

    _MK

    "The things you get fired for when you’re young are the same things you get Lifetime Achievements for when you’re old."

  3. #3
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    I had an EXR comp that came stock on my bike. The fork was downright dangerous and had many problems....preload screw kept on backing out - fork kept on loosing air,,,and a bunch of other stuff.

    I would say go with the MX cause itll probably last you longer and save you money in the long run. The decent Marzocchi stuff generally lasts a really long time. Im riding a 2001 atom race that i got off of ebay and after an overhaul it rides perfect.

  4. #4

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    Ive had some MZ COMP since i got them in 2004 done a few services but other then that have never had to buy new parts,Ive used them for XC and DJ and they havent gone wrong mainly becuase im a smooth rider and ive looked after them ive gave them my bro now so he can practice DJ,But really you should get the MX's cause they will feel alot better and be alot stronger.

  5. #5
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    I have an EXR dual air, have had it a year and a half - zero problems and is a nice plush fork.
    Less isn't MOAR

  6. #6
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    I have an 04 MX Comp....

    0 problems! Regular maintenance and a little TLC and they're very durable. The air preload system doesn't use a cartridge. The air chamber is actually the air space between the oil and the top cap, nothing mechanical to it. The only thing that you have to make sure of is that you have a good LOW PRESSURE shock pump for setting the preload. A couple of PSI can make a huge difference in the way the fork peforms and feels. The MX Pro has some nicer features than the Comp but at a higher price point as you have mentioned. But it is worth the extra $ for the extra features and the better quality. This is deffinately a situation where you get what you pay for. Esspecially when you are talking the difference between the EXR, MZ and MX series of forks. Personally the MX series is as low as I would go in the Marzocchi food chain.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  7. #7
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    Listen to MK

    Quote Originally Posted by MK_
    Of the 3 forks you've named, I think only the MX Pro is made by Marzocchi. The other two, although they bear the Marzocchi name, are made by Suntour. MZ has elastomers and coils, no damping circuitry. EXR is not unlike the MX, except some damping elements are plastic. The chasis is heavier, also. Although it bears very similar dimensions, the materials used are cheaper. An alternative to MX pro is MX comp which sould be about $50 less and is just as good. All it is missing is external rebound adjustment. Air preload is very durable.

    _MK
    He's got it right. It should also be mentioned that depending on the model year and version, the EXR could be dual coil, coil and elastomer, or air sprung. With the MX Comp series, there was a dual coil version, and the ETA versions were a hybrid coil and air combo until '06. The MX Pro through '05 was an air sprung fork. In '06, the complete MX line (Comp and Pro w/ETA) are air sprung. (I believe I have this correct). To further complicate things, the Aftermarket and OEM forks have differences too. In any event, be very sure of what year and model fork you are buying, and whether or not the fork is OEM or Aftermarket, and check the Marzocchi web site for specifics.

    In any event, I'd go with the MX series.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  8. #8
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    I <3 my MX

    I also have an MX comp 85. The thing is bulletproof. I love the ride. Just get one. I will never buy anything but Marzocchi because of that fork.

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys I'm looking into maybe an 85mm mx now because my noleen fork was too long on my bike at 100mm and could've been longer when it was set at 75mm
    or what I was also thinking is getting a 100mm version and perhaps limiting the travel with some cut PVC pipe so I can later remove them and use the fork on a new bike.

    I definetly wont choose a fork with inferior materials becuase my noleen I'm replacing is full of cheap (but light) plastic and I stripped a piece
    Kona Coiler

  10. #10
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    wow that sucks that all the '06s are air, I'm trying to find a coil 85mm
    edit: can a 120mm version somehow be limited oh, say, 30mm? there isn't a whole lot of selection of new 2005 forks
    Last edited by umbertom; 07-07-2006 at 04:27 PM.
    Kona Coiler

  11. #11
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    One place to look

    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    wow that sucks that all the '06s are air, I'm trying to find a coil 85mm
    edit: can a 120mm version somehow be limited oh, say, 30mm? there isn't a whole lot of selection of new 2005 forks
    I have an '05 Marzocchi MX Comp Coil 85mm. It will be difficult to find, but keep your eyes peeled. It is an OEM product, but mine came brand new in a box and I got it for $175.00 shipped. Here's a link to it on Marzocchi's site:

    http://www.marzocchi.com/Template/de...IDOggetto=8432

    Best wishes in finding a good coil fork.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  12. #12
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    175 shipped, amazing
    I believe this is exactly what I was looking for even though it's $245+shipping
    I read in the reviews on this site that this fork only gets about 65-70mm of actual travel
    clyde, if you're running this fork can you confirm what kind of travel it gets?
    Thank you
    Kona Coiler

  13. #13
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    Not sure on travel

    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    175 shipped, amazing
    I believe this is exactly what I was looking for even though it's $245+shipping
    I read in the reviews on this site that this fork only gets about 65-70mm of actual travel
    clyde, if you're running this fork can you confirm what kind of travel it gets?
    Thank you
    I've had the fork for a few months now and have only logged about 25 miles of paved path and light gravel roads on it. I don't doubt the claims that it's only getting 70mm of actual travel. Marzocchi's aren't known for bottoming out too often It's been very good for the time I've had it, and for the light usage it's been put through. I do expect to take it on some more technical singletrack this summer.

    Again, keep your eyes peeled. they show up on ebay from time to time. I'll be happy to PM you if I come across one, as I'm scouring ebay now for another hardtail project I might embark on.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  14. #14
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    edit tomy last post, I completly left out the link
    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...-Fork-85mm.htm

    I wonder if the new '06 version is tweaked any different than the '05 OEMs
    Kona Coiler

  15. #15
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    The canadian distributor lists the origin country for the various models in their catalog and as I recall, the AM 1 is made in taiwan, as well as the grand fondo and a bunch of others below the MX Pro/ETA of the aftermarket line, as well as most all the OEM ones.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    I wouldn't think the air-preload would take as much abuse as an air-spring so would it be less prone to leaking (I'm coming off a noleen mega-air....)?
    Given that the air seals in both are rubber o-rings, neither is any less/more prone to leaking. I've run MegaAirs for 5 years now with no leakage issues.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    Given that the air seals in both are rubber o-rings, neither is any less/more prone to leaking. I've run MegaAirs for 5 years now with no leakage issues.
    but an air-spring uses twice as high psi doesn't it? I would think 60+ psi would leak a easier than <30psi


    My MegaAir is toast because in the left rebound leg the metal rod completly stipped the plastic piece and it's not like there's a noleen that I can buy parts from
    Kona Coiler

  18. #18
    Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    but an air-spring uses twice as high psi doesn't it? I would think 60+ psi would leak a easier than <30psi
    So? the seals are the same as used in paintball guns and those can hold hundreds of psi for months or more without leaking in many cases. I've pressurized cheap plastic pump guns with a 12 gram cartridge, which is btw, about 800psi internal pressure at room temperature, and gone back to the gun a year later and its still got a full cartridge.

    My MegaAir is toast because in the left rebound leg the metal rod completly stipped the plastic piece and it's not like there's a noleen that I can buy parts from
    yes there is, noleen was a division of K2, and they still had tons of parts for the forks when people got crazy buying them up 2 years ago on here.
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  19. #19
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    Different fork

    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    edit tomy last post, I completly left out the link
    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...-Fork-85mm.htm

    I wonder if the new '06 version is tweaked any different than the '05 OEMs
    The '06 are air sprung, so it's a different fork. The '05 MX Comp Coil (and the designation "Coil" in the name will be key if you search for this fork) is coil sprung in both legs with SSV damping. Check that Marzocchi link I gave you for clarification. Like I said originally, each modle year they have different specs. It can be pretty confusing.

    I hope this clarifies the difference.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  20. #20

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    I've a 130mm OE Drop Off; huffed the stickers for some from Marzocchi's sticker sheets, and my 2005 Ironhorse Hardtail is just fine. I will take this to G-outs after 30-40 foot drops where you return back the same type transition. 20psi in the preload and anywhere from 7 to 27 in the air-assist. I'm 6', 205lbs and do not stop to smell the flowers. This fork was given from my friend who owns a bike shop, and for where I ride (SWFL) his other option was a Z1 Freeride, same stroke. Get on it.

  21. #21
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    Hey, what would you guys recomend in a 130mm travel fork going on a haro x3 dual susp. Currently i'm torn between the rock shox tora 302 and dj III. But the shock can't have 20mm thru axel, any help or where i can find sumthing cheap would be greatly appretiated. thansk all

  22. #22

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    Firstly, a dirtjump shock is not going to perform on the trails. And, likewise a trail shock will never be a dirtjump. 130mm is too big for thrashing anyway. I'd source out what I ride on. You seem to have made a base decision though. Remember that your skill gets you to the end of the trail, not the equiptment. Hone up your chops, and get just enough fork to get the job done.

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