Manitou Minute vs Manitou R7?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Manitou Minute vs Manitou R7?

    I'm looking to replace the sr suntour fork on my set up, ( mainly but I'm too fat and keep bottoming out lol), and was about to grab a 2011 minute I found on sale for 280, but just found an r7 for 320.


    Is the extra money worth the difference? I'm still pretty new and don't know the big differences between alot of forks. I was warned away from the RS turnkey dampers, but any other advice is appreciated!

  2. #2
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    The minute has 32mm stanchion tubes and the R7 has 30mm stanchions. So the Minute will be stiffer, but weigh a little more. I would go with the Minute.

  3. #3
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    The R7 is a xc race fork while the minute is more heavy duty xc/trail riding. Minute would be the better choice

  4. #4
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    I'm 210 and whatever my gear weighs. I loved my R7s. The Minute seems pretty nice too, but I don't have ride experience to tell you to go get it.

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    Thanks a bunch, I'm around 190 ( hopefully not for long) and the 'smoothest' trails here are pretty rocky, so a bit stiffer seems to be a good idea.

    Ordered the minute, should be here sometime next week. As always, I appreciate all the help!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Numbtoyou
    Thanks a bunch, I'm around 190 ( hopefully not for long) and the 'smoothest' trails here are pretty rocky, so a bit stiffer seems to be a good idea.

    Ordered the minute, should be here sometime next week. As always, I appreciate all the help!

    Awesome! Enjoy the ride!

  7. #7
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    Ive also heard the R7 requires maintenance more often, is that true?
    And what are the maintenance intervals for these 2 forks? (oil change and/or seals)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by assas1n
    Ive also heard the R7 requires maintenance more often, is that true?
    And what are the maintenance intervals for these 2 forks? (oil change and/or seals)
    Manitous have amazing seals, i've rebuilt forks which have been run for years without being cracked open and the bath oil is generally still there (somewhat) and pretty damned clean. They're also a doddle to service. I'm still running the original seals on my 2008 minute, and we've had some very dusty, and very muddy years here (brisbane floods were international news).

    I doubt that R7's require closer service intervals, the seals are just as good (and if anything, the smaller stanchion area would actually catch less dust!). I've never had issues with earlier 30mm manitou forks (my dad has a 2005 scarab running the original seals, serviced once!), so i'd assume the R7 would be just as hardy as the minute.

  9. #9
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    there is also the minute pro which is a good deal lighter than the expert. then there is the marvel but i haven't heard much about it.

  10. #10
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    yeah I looked at the minute pro, but it was a good deal more exspensive, and I have plenty of weight to take off myself before I need to worry about my bike....

  11. #11
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    Even the expert will be a good deal lighter than the suntour, and the damping/plushness will be a whole new ballgame in comparison.

  12. #12
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    You will enjoy the min expert. I have an 06 r7 with tpc and a 10 drake (same as '11 min expert). At 200lbs, I prefer the drake. It seems stiffer and little more plush to me. However, the new r7's have abs+ too, and that might make a difference.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlouder
    You will enjoy the min expert. I have an 06 r7 with tpc and a 10 drake (same as '11 min expert). At 200lbs, I prefer the drake. It seems stiffer and little more plush to me. However, the new r7's have abs+ too, and that might make a difference.
    Minute has Absolute+ as well. Manitou's specs say it's "trail tuned", though. Do you have any idea what's the difference from the standard Absolute+ provided by R7?

  14. #14
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    Manitou Minute Pro vs. Expert

    Quote Originally Posted by Numbtoyou
    yeah I looked at the minute pro, but it was a good deal more exspensive, and I have plenty of weight to take off myself before I need to worry about my bike....
    Besides weight, Pro and Expert have a different spring system. Pro has MARS Air, while ACT Air. The former is a true hybrid coil/air spring, so you can make it tighter by pumping more air in it. The latter is basically a coil spring with an air chamber that allows just to set the desired sag.

    I wonder whether the higher adjustability of MARS Air is really needed, when maybe you can get a similar effect through Absolute+ regulation. Yes, with Absolute+ you just set the platform (i.e. low-speed damping), while pumping more air in an air spring makes it tighter indeed. But do you think you can feel this difference?

    I weigh 154 lbs. I see that Expert's coil comes with a "medium" spring rate. Do you think this rate is good for my weight?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Minute has Absolute+ as well. Manitou's specs say it's "trail tuned", though. Do you have any idea what's the difference from the standard Absolute+ provided by R7?

    "Trail tuned" is nothing more then a different shim stack, designed for more aggressive riding.

  16. #16
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    Back to maintenance for a second, what is the easiest to maintain (or has the fewest things that can go wrong):

    ACT Air - Minute Expert
    MARS Air - Minute Pro
    TS Air - R7 Pro & MRD

    I'm thinking I'll pick up a manitou in the next few months. Lightweight would be nice, but for me simplicity is probably more important. From the service doc (here, if Numbtoyou or anyone else is interested) it looks like MARS is a bit more complicated, but is it enough to make a difference?

    And is bushing replacement a concern with any of these? A bushing kit is identified in the schematic, so does that mean they all have replaceable bushings? There's no replacement instructions so I can't tell.

  17. #17
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    Thanks, the service manual is helpul. I'm still pretty much brand new, but have found that the fork I had was just too soft for me more han anything else, and I'm of the mindset if I'm gonna have to spend 150 to get a stiffer fork, another 100 for a 'good' fork would be worth it in the long run, so I stuck with the expert. Not in yet, but once I get a few rides on it, I'll let you all know.( though coming from me, it may mean nothing)

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled
    Back to maintenance for a second, what is the easiest to maintain (or has the fewest things that can go wrong):

    ACT Air - Minute Expert
    MARS Air - Minute Pro
    TS Air - R7 Pro & MRD

    I'm thinking I'll pick up a manitou in the next few months. Lightweight would be nice, but for me simplicity is probably more important. From the service doc (here, if Numbtoyou or anyone else is interested) it looks like MARS is a bit more complicated, but is it enough to make a difference?

    And is bushing replacement a concern with any of these? A bushing kit is identified in the schematic, so does that mean they all have replaceable bushings? There's no replacement instructions so I can't tell.

    Easiest to maintain would be the ACT air. ACT is a coil fork with air assist, the coil does most the work and there is not a lot of air pressure(50psi max), so its pretty low maintenance and the easiest to work on. The best part about ACT is that if the air spring fails during a ride, The fork will stay extended and keep its functionality, allowing you to finish the ride. This is not the case with MARS or TS air. Down side is its the heaviest of the bunch.

    MARS and TS would tie for maintenance. MARS has a coil spring like ACT, but it is much smaller and it works in series with the air spring. The air spring does much more work with the MARS system and can handle higher pressures. This would mean seals would need replaced and/or lubed more often then with ACT. TS is a straight air spring and has the same maintenance schedule as any other air spring forks.

    As far as I know, All Manitou forks have replaceable bushings.

  19. #19
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    ^ that's terrific information. Thanks a lot.

  20. #20
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    MARS vs ACT Air

    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    ACT is a coil fork with air assist, the coil does most the work [...] The best part about ACT is that if the air spring fails during a ride, The fork will stay extended and keep its functionality, allowing you to finish the ride. This is not the case with MARS or TS air. Down side is its the heaviest of the bunch.
    What do you think about the supposedly better adjustability of MARS when compared to ACT?

    MARS Air is a hybrid spring consisting of a small coil spring and an air chamber. The two springs work in series, minimizing sticktion and providing smooth, bottomless travel. The result is a fork with the suppleness of a coil spring and the light weight and adjustability of an air spring.
    http://www.manitoumtb.com/index.php?page=tech

    As I was wondering in a previous post, is the adjustability of an air spring really needed when you already have the Absolute+ compression damper? I would think this further adjustability would be negligible, wouldn't it?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    What do you think about the supposedly better adjustability of MARS when compared to ACT?

    MARS Air is a hybrid spring consisting of a small coil spring and an air chamber. The two springs work in series, minimizing sticktion and providing smooth, bottomless travel. The result is a fork with the suppleness of a coil spring and the light weight and adjustability of an air spring.
    http://www.manitoumtb.com/index.php?page=tech

    As I was wondering in a previous post, is the adjustability of an air spring really needed when you already have the Absolute+ compression damper? I would think this further adjustability would be negligible, wouldn't it?

    Since Both MARS and ACT have coil springs, they have limits on how adjustable they are without changing coils. MARS will give you a slightly wider weight range between coils because the air spring can handle higher pressures. Both forks come with a medium coil spring stock (except the minute pro 140mm, which comes with a firm spring). That gives a weight range for ACT of around 140-185lbs riders and Mars 140-200lbs. Although I have heard of some people weighing over 210 getting proper sag with both systems.

    The instability is need. When setting up any fork, You should always set your sag to 20-25% with no compression damping. This is needed to allow the fork to function properly(allowing it to extend over small dips in the ground to keep traction)

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    Since Both MARS and ACT have coil springs, they have limits on how adjustable they are without changing coils. MARS will give you a slightly wider weight range between coils because the air spring can handle higher pressures. Both forks come with a medium coil spring stock (except the minute pro 140mm, which comes with a firm spring). That gives a weight range for ACT of around 140-185lbs riders and Mars 140-200lbs. Although I have heard of some people weighing over 210 getting proper sag with both systems.
    Thank you very much, you gave me lots of information! So ACT would be perfect for me, since I weigh 154 lbs and the medium range is just right.

    The only thing I should consider is the fork's weight, but I see that Minute Expert has the option of aluminum steerer (like Pro), instead of steel. Expert 80 mm weighs 4.37 lbs w/Steel Steerer while 4.1 lbs w/Aluminum Steerer.

    Do you know how much it weighs the 100 mm?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    Easiest to maintain would be the ACT air. ACT is a coil fork with air assist, the coil does most the work and there is not a lot of air pressure(50psi max), so its pretty low maintenance and the easiest to work on. The best part about ACT is that if the air spring fails during a ride, The fork will stay extended and keep its functionality, allowing you to finish the ride. This is not the case with MARS or TS air. Down side is its the heaviest of the bunch.

    MARS and TS would tie for maintenance. MARS has a coil spring like ACT, but it is much smaller and it works in series with the air spring. The air spring does much more work with the MARS system and can handle higher pressures. This would mean seals would need replaced and/or lubed more often then with ACT. TS is a straight air spring and has the same maintenance schedule as any other air spring forks.
    It's kind of off topic, but Marzocchi does the same thing of mixing air with coil, and I just don't like it. It seems like you're getting the worst of both worlds, with the weight of a coil, and the seals/maintenance/stiction of air. Plus, the system is more complicated than either air or coil.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    It's kind of off topic, but Marzocchi does the same thing of mixing air with coil, and I just don't like it. It seems like you're getting the worst of both worlds, with the weight of a coil, and the seals/maintenance/stiction of air. Plus, the system is more complicated than either air or coil.
    I don't have any riding time on my new-to-me Marz 44 yet, but I was just working on it last night and I found the spring side internals far less complicated than the RS Dual Air and Solo Air systems.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Thank you very much, you gave me lots of information! So ACT would be perfect for me, since I weigh 154 lbs and the medium range is just right.

    The only thing I should consider is the fork's weight, but I see that Minute Expert has the option of aluminum steerer (like Pro), instead of steel. Expert 80 mm weighs 4.37 lbs w/Steel Steerer while 4.1 lbs w/Aluminum Steerer.

    Do you know how much it weighs the 100 mm?
    I have a 2010 130mm Drake, Which is the exact same fork as a 2011 Minute expert. My 130mm weighs in on my scale at 4.15 lbs.


    Randomly, I weigh the same as you (155lbs). So I thought it may be helpful to tell you I run 25-30psi in my fork. I Run a slightly high pressure to help with bottom out resistance. The fact that my fork has longer travel may have an effect on what pressure you would run, but 20ish would be a good starting point for you.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    I have a 2010 130mm Drake, Which is the exact same fork as a 2011 Minute expert. My 130mm weighs in on my scale at 4.15 lbs.

    Randomly, I weigh the same as you (155lbs). So I thought it may be helpful to tell you I run 25-30psi in my fork. I Run a slightly high pressure to help with bottom out resistance. The fact that my fork has longer travel may have an effect on what pressure you would run, but 20ish would be a good starting point for you.
    Thanks again for your tips! Your fork is pretty light, is it with aluminum steerer?

    At first I thought I would change my current Manitou Slate Super 2007 80 mm with an R7 Pro 100 mm, but you've convinced me to opt for Minute Expert instead. I think its better for the kind of hard XC I do--I enjoy the bit technical single-track after a long uphill ride, rather than the quick fireroad. And it's cheaper as well.

    Just hope to find a good deal for a version with V-Brake bosses.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Thanks again for your tips! Your fork is pretty light, is it with aluminum steerer?

    At first I thought I would change my current Manitou Slate Super 2007 80 mm with an R7 Pro 100 mm, but you've convinced me to opt for Minute Expert instead. I think its better for the kind of hard XC I do--I enjoy the bit technical single-track after a long uphill ride, rather than the quick fireroad. And it's cheaper as well.

    Just hope to find a good deal for a version with V-Brake bosses.
    That is with an aluminum steerer cut to the length I needed with a star nut installed

    http://www.bikesonline.com/manitou-m...r-w-bosses.htm

    weight claimed by that site is 4.2 lbs with full length steerer

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone


    Just hope to find a good deal for a version with V-Brake bosses.

    I actually don't want the bosses but couldn't find anywhere that had the disc only in stock for a similar price.

    You shouldn't have a problem.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    http://www.bikesonline.com/manitou-m...r-w-bosses.htm
    weight claimed by that site is 4.2 lbs with full length steerer
    Their fork has an aluminum steerer as well.

    BTW, they sell it at a super interesting price, but unfortunately they ship from the US, while I am in Italy, so I would have the issue of VAT, customs fees & charges

  30. #30
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    New question here. Manitou Minute Expert 2010?

    But when Minute Expert was released? In 2011 or in 2010? I thought in 2011 (in 2010 the very same fork was called Drake, wasn't it?), but a guy from an e-shop is telling me the Minute Expert he has on stock is probably a 2010...

    Here is his item. I don't see any difference with the 2011 model.
    Last edited by solitone; 05-06-2011 at 08:28 AM.

  31. #31
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    Downloading manitou's service guides

    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled
    From the service doc (here, if Numbtoyou or anyone else is interested) [...]
    Did you manage to download recent years' service guides? After several minutes of download, I'm always getting an error telling me the input file cannot be read...

  32. #32
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    I was able to download the recent service guide with no issue.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    But when Minute Expert was released? In 2011 or in 2010? I thought in 2011 (in 2010 the very same fork was called Drake, wasn't it?), but a guy from an e-shop is telling me the Minute Expert he has on stock is probably a 2010...

    Here is his item. I don't see any difference with the 2011 model.

    The picture shows a 2011. Like you said, The fork was called a Drake in 2010. See if you can get a deal since they are claiming its a 2010

  34. #34
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    Manitou Minute: Expert vs. Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by dundundata
    there is also the minute pro which is a good deal lighter than the expert.
    Apart from the spring (MARS vs. ACT), the crown is different in the 2 models.

    The specs say that Pro has a Forged Deep Bore Hollow Crown, while Expert has a Forged I-Beam Crown.

    what's the difference in other words?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlouder
    I have an 06 r7 with tpc and a 10 drake (same as '11 min expert)
    Does anyone have either a 10 drake or 11 minute 100 mm?

    i'd be interested to know how much is the axle-to-crown height. i have a 07 slate 80 mm and i wonder how the new 100 mm fork would change my bike's geometry.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Does anyone have either a 10 drake or 11 minute 100 mm?

    i'd be interested to know how much is the axle-to-crown height. i have a 07 slate 80 mm and i wonder how the new 100 mm fork would change my bike's geometry.

    http://www.manitoumtb.com/index.php?...discipline=all

    478mm Its the 3rd to last category on the page.

    As for the crowns. The "I-beam" Is new for 2011. Its a solid piece of aluminum shaped like an I-beam. Should be very strong, but slightly heavier since its a solid piece. The Hollow crown is similar to aluminum tubing, but its one piece. Still strong, But lighter since less material is used.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    http://www.manitoumtb.com/index.php?...discipline=all

    478mm Its the 3rd to last category on the page.
    Thanks, i didn't notice I see Pro is about 20 mm heigher than Expert, I didn't know that..!

    thanks for the crown details also!

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Thanks, i didn't notice I see Pro is about 20 mm heigher than Expert, I didn't know that..!

    thanks for the crown details also!
    The Pro and Expert are the same 478mm height for 100mm travel. The shorter number that is first under the Expert is for the 80mm travel version

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    The hollow crown is lighter and as stiff, but of course more expensive to manufacture.

  40. #40
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    Idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    The Pro and Expert are the same 478mm height for 100mm travel. The shorter number that is first under the Expert is for the 80mm travel version
    Yes, that's defenitely right, i looked at those numbers carelessly..

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    Tower / Minute Expert: OEM vs aftermarket

    i've read on twentinineinches that aftermarket Manitou Tower Expert forks have aluminum steerer tubes, while OEMs have steel ones.

    First, do you know whether this is in fact the case? Do aftermarket expert forks have always aluminum steerers?

    second, is this true also for Minute Expert? minute is very similar to tower, but for 26ers

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    i've read on twentinineinches that aftermarket Manitou Tower Expert forks have aluminum steerer tubes, while OEMs have steel ones.

    First, do you know whether this is in fact the case? Do aftermarket expert forks have always aluminum steerers?

    second, is this true also for Minute Expert? minute is very similar to tower, but for 26ers
    That wouldn't be unusual. Fork manufacturers (not just manutou) build oem forks to a bike companies specs. Bike companies pinch pennies where they can. Sad that they put the same name on each fork. I've read that some oem tora's came with cheaper internals as well. Tough for a consumer to figure it out with these practices. Best bet would be to ask the seller about the specs of an oem fork.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    i've read on twentinineinches that aftermarket Manitou Tower Expert forks have aluminum steerer tubes, while OEMs have steel ones.

    First, do you know whether this is in fact the case? Do aftermarket expert forks have always aluminum steerers?

    second, is this true also for Minute Expert? minute is very similar to tower, but for 26ers

    Its very possible that all aftermarket minutes have aluminum steerers. You are correct in saying the tower and minutes are similar. They are the same fork, but manitou wanted to give the 29'r forks there own name, so they started calling them towers rather then a minute 29'r.

  44. #44
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    We the people ...

    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    i've read on twentinineinches that aftermarket Manitou Tower Expert forks have aluminum steerer tubes, while OEMs have steel ones.
    I wrote to Manitou and they confirmed me that aftermarket Minute Expert forks come with aluminum steerers--not steel.

    BTW, I have to say Manitou's Dealer Sales & Tech/Warranty Support is great! I wrote them several times, first to ask about warranty validity issues and now to know these technical details, and they always answered me quickly.

    Now I only have to place the order for my new fork!

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone

    Now I only have to place the order for my new fork!
    Speedgoat has great prices on them... http://www.speedgoat.com/Catalog.asp...fg=1231&Page=1
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

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    Currently I have a 2005 Manitou Minute that has the dampening rod broke off.

    Does it make sense to try to get replacement parts (from who?) or should I just upgrade to something new.

    I have a 2005 Stumpjumper FSRXC. What would be a good comparable fork for it?

    Thanks

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlbarnab
    What would be a good comparable fork for it?

    Thanks
    Yeah, replace it... The new Manitou Minute Pro will blow it away.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  48. #48
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    Good job! Manitou Minute Expert

    Ordered! 220 Euro (around 310 $) including shipment, on bikepalast.com.

    Speedgoat.com has even better prices, but I live in Europe and didn't want to risk customs fees & expenses, VAT, and so on..

    Hope it'll arrive soon!

  49. #49
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    Update ( for those who care) Got it last week, installed. I've ridden it to work everyday since, and gone out on some of the same trails I was on before and I can say it was well worth the money.

    I didn't realize how much my old fork was bouncing back too sharply causing balance and control issues. Granted, I'm still no pro, but definetly more comfortable on the bike.

    I get a little brake dive down steep areas and bob going up, but I think those have more to do wtih my technique ( or lack) than anything else.

    Basically, its been great so far ( and finding it for just over $200 even better)

    Thanks for all the advice and help. Now I'm gonna put as many miles on it as I can.
    Last edited by Numbtoyou; 05-13-2011 at 09:25 AM.

  50. #50
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    Thats great news you liked your new fork!

    A tip on controlling dive:

    1) Be sure to get the correct PSI on your fork according to your weight.
    2) On most situations i run 3-4 clicks on low speed compression, which avoids all pedal bob, still some braking dive when going down really steep though.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    "Trail tuned" is nothing more then a different shim stack, designed for more aggressive riding.
    Have you got any idea what's the difference with the standard shim stack--that you find in the R7 for instance?

    Maybe it has some more larger shims, so that the HSC needs larger bumps to open??

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Have you got any idea what's the difference with the standard shim stack--that you find in the R7 for instance?

    Maybe it has some more larger shims, so that the HSC needs larger bumps to open??

    To be honest, I have never opened one up to know. Anything I would say would be nothing more then speculation. You can always shoot an email to [email protected] and I'm sure will be more then happy to answer it for you.

  53. #53
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    Trail tuned ABS+ damper

    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119
    "Trail tuned" is nothing more then a different shim stack, designed for more aggressive riding.
    I asked some details on this point to Manitou's technical support and they answered and helped as usual

    They told me that trail tuning adds a speed shim to the shim stack. The speed shim lays on top of the piston, after the 2 platform shims (aka blow-off shims) and the smaller clamp shim.

    Thanks to the speed shim, the damping curve gains velocity dependency--i.e. it responds to stroke velocity. This should result in better bottoming control and reduced dive.

    With XC Series shim stacks, on the other hand, the wheel is allowed to travel more easily after the platform is exceeded, because velocity dependency is minimized.

    You can find furhter details hitting the link I posted in thread How to guide: Reshim your ABS+ HSC shim stack.
    Last edited by solitone; 05-19-2011 at 05:07 AM.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    I wrote to Manitou and they confirmed me that aftermarket Minute Expert forks come with aluminum steerers--not steel.
    Just arrived! Actually it has a steel steerer, so what they told me isnn't accurate.

    It weighs 2060 grams uncut--it's the 100 mm.

    Now i just have to mount it! How is it the best way to cut the steer tube?

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    whoops!

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone
    Just arrived! Actually it has a steel steerer, so what they told me isnn't accurate.

    It weighs 2060 grams uncut--it's the 100 mm.

    Now i just have to mount it! How is it the best way to cut the steer tube?
    A pipe cutter works best, but if you can cut a straight line with a hack saw or sawsall, they will work in a pinch.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    A pipe cutter works best
    A friend told me that the pipe cutter can leave a burr around the inside of the tube. Does this represent a problem when installing the star nut inside the steerer tube?

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    A friend told me that the pipe cutter can leave a burr around the inside of the tube. Does this represent a problem when installing the star nut inside the steerer tube?

    If the pipe cutter has a dull cutting wheel, it can leave a small burr, mostly on the outside of the tube. If this happens, you can easily just file it down. Its the best way to cut it because its the easiest way to make a clean, straight cut. I have used a saw a few times before, its just harder to make a straight cut.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    Just arrived! Actually it has a steel steerer, so what they (Manitou Technical Service) told me isnn't accurate
    Well, perhaps they sold me an OEM fork, as it arrived in a Rockshox box.

    Anyway, I mounted on my bike and tomorrow I will eventually try it

    The only thing, I'm not sure about sag. It's just 1 cm and my fork's travel is 100 mm. Even without air I don't have 2 cm. But maybe I didn't manage to take an accurate measurement...

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    Well, perhaps they sold me an OEM fork, as it arrived in a Rockshox box.

    Anyway, I mounted on my bike and tomorrow I will eventually try it

    The only thing, I'm not sure about sag. It's just 1 cm and my fork's travel is 100 mm. Even without air I don't have 2 cm. But maybe I didn't manage to take an accurate measurement...
    The ACT Air spring in that fork is primarily a coil spring but with air assist to dial in the right feel and sag. Because it's primarily a coil spring you still have to make sure you have the right weight spring for you, and in this case it sounds like the stock spring is too heavy

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn View Post
    The ACT Air spring in that fork is primarily a coil spring but with air assist to dial in the right feel and sag. Because it's primarily a coil spring you still have to make sure you have the right weight spring for you, and in this case it sounds like the stock spring is too heavy
    Yes, that could be, although I weigh 154 lbs and so I though the stock spring would be ok. I'll double check tomorrow.

    In case, is it tricky to change the spring?

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    Yes, that could be, although I weigh 154 lbs and so I though the stock spring would be ok. I'll double check tomorrow.

    In case, is it tricky to change the spring?
    I don't know actually. Manitou customer service is supposed to be good for help, but there might even be something in the documentation on their website

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    Yes, that could be, although I weigh 154 lbs and so I though the stock spring would be ok. I'll double check tomorrow.

    In case, is it tricky to change the spring?
    Changing the spring would be super easy. But I weigh 155 as well and the stock spring on mine was a little stiff at first, But after a few rides, it was super soft and I needed to run 25-30 psi. I say give it a few rides.

    Also, make sure your checking your sag with the ABS+ fully open

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    But a stock coil is soft, med or firm?

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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    But a stock coil is soft, med or firm?
    Medium for all forks except the circus, which comes stock with a firm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    Medium for all forks except the circus, which comes stock with a firm.
    Thanks! I saw it is specified at Minute's webpage.

    It is the final part of this article that confused me--the list has soft, med, firm and also stock coils, all having different product codes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    Changing the spring would be super easy. But I weigh 155 as well and the stock spring on mine was a little stiff at first, But after a few rides, it was super soft and I needed to run 25-30 psi. I say give it a few rides.
    Yes, I read it takes about 20 riding hours to break in.

    Anyway, yesterday I tried it for the first time and it was awesome! It's far better than my old 2007 Manitou Slate Super 80 mm, it is a thouroughly different riding experience!

    And when I came home I even saw I had mistakenly inflated it at a too high pressure--I'd had a problem reading the scale of my pump. I thought I had inflated at 0,5 bar, while actually pressure was 50 psi, the maximum allowed for ACT air forks!

    Now I have deflated at 10 psi and will try it again.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    Yes, I read it takes about 20 riding hours to break in.

    Anyway, yesterday I tried it for the first time and it was awesome! It's far better than my old 2007 Manitou Slate Super 80 mm, it is a thouroughly different riding experience!

    And when I came home I even saw I had mistakenly inflated it at a too high pressure--I'd had a problem reading the scale of my pump. I thought I had inflated at 0,5 bar, while actually pressure was 50 psi, the maximum allowed for ACT air forks!

    Now I have deflated at 10 psi and will try it again.
    I bet it will feel a lot more plush today!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    I bet it will feel a lot more plush today!
    With 10 psi, sag is almost 1,5 cm, which probably is not ideal, but should be appropriate for a hard-tail. Anyway, considering current sag, I reckon the fork will be perfect when it breaks in.

    I haven't had time to try it again on the trail--can't wait and see how it behaves now that I have reduced pressure. Before it was a bit stiff in the second half of the travel and I didn't manage to take advantage of the whole 100 mm.

    Now it should be much better

  70. #70
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    Last week Chainreactioncycles had a great deal on the R7, so yesterday mine arrived and I got it all setup. Since this is my first fork with a decent damper, what's the best approach?

    Do people adjust the ABS+ setting as they're riding - ie. generally keep it near fully open, but then switch it to platform if there's a long climb coming up? Or is tuning the shimstack the better way to get the best of both worlds?

    Haven't had it on the trails yet - so far just the boring ride to work (and I broke off my front fender with the reverse arch. doh. Although it was a crappy fender anyway). But I've got a lot of experimenting to do at lunch and after work.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Last week Chainreactioncycles had a great deal on the R7, so yesterday mine arrived and I got it all setup. Since this is my first fork with a decent damper, what's the best approach?

    Do people adjust the ABS+ setting as they're riding - ie. generally keep it near fully open, but then switch it to platform if there's a long climb coming up? Or is tuning the shimstack the better way to get the best of both worlds?

    Haven't had it on the trails yet - so far just the boring ride to work (and I broke off my front fender with the reverse arch. doh. Although it was a crappy fender anyway). But I've got a lot of experimenting to do at lunch and after work.
    I say set it and forget it. Don't worry about tuning the shim stack unless you're extremely picky, ride in non-typical terrain every day or just really like to tinker. Keep in mind, unless you really know what you're doing and keep good notes, you're more likely to screw up your compression rather than make it better.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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    I adjust my ABS+ to be close to 'locked out' at the beginning of most my rides, but most of my rides are about an hour climb up to a 'flater' area where I take a breather ( since I'm still out of shape and will be for a while) and soften it up a bit to go along the rockier areas and for the decent. It takes all of 2 seconds to turn the knob, don't have to get off the bike or anything.

    The change in the fork has also been the best thing I've done. I'm far more confident on the bike, better at decents, not almost going over the bars everytime I need to brake ( the dive was terrible on my prev. fork)

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Last week Chainreactioncycles had a great deal on the R7, so yesterday mine arrived and I got it all setup. Since this is my first fork with a decent damper, what's the best approach?

    Do people adjust the ABS+ setting as they're riding - ie. generally keep it near fully open, but then switch it to platform if there's a long climb coming up? Or is tuning the shimstack the better way to get the best of both worlds?

    Haven't had it on the trails yet - so far just the boring ride to work (and I broke off my front fender with the reverse arch. doh. Although it was a crappy fender anyway). But I've got a lot of experimenting to do at lunch and after work.
    I TRY to set it and forget it. I look for running just enough LSC (ABS+) to keep most pedal bob and brake dive to a reasonable amount while still keeping most the small bump compliance.

    As for the shim stack tuning, IMO, Its VERY important to have a proper shim stack. Running a stack thats to stiff or not stiff enough can greatly effect the overall feel of a fork. Solitone posted a GREAT link in the ABS+ shim tuning thread that shows many different stacks with dyno graphs showing how they change the oil flow, and it does a decent job at explaining how it effects the feel of the fork.

  74. #74
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    Yeah, that Manitou document with all the information on the stacks is terrific. I just need more time to digest all of it. But in there it says "The best ride quality will be achieved when the platform force is just enough for the needs of the rider." And that sounds like what you're saying mullen119 - to run just enough ABS+. So basically the starting point for tuning is to run fully-open, and then add a few clicks from there (as opposed to starting fully locked-out, and dialing down a few clicks)?

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Yeah, that Manitou document with all the information on the stacks is terrific. I just need more time to digest all of it. But in there it says "The best ride quality will be achieved when the platform force is just enough for the needs of the rider." And that sounds like what you're saying mullen119 - to run just enough ABS+. So basically the starting point for tuning is to run fully-open, and then add a few clicks from there (as opposed to starting fully locked-out, and dialing down a few clicks)?
    What I would suggest is to start fully open, and add clicks until your happy with the effect it has on the brake dive and pedal bob. Once you find that setting, you can decide if you need to adjust the shim stack to allow it to blow off easier(weaker stack) or give a firmer feel(stronger stack).

  76. #76
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    might be old post but I looking at trading in my 09 Drake 80mm forks on a 26er in for the Manitou Trade in program
    but I was thinking of getting the Circus in 100mm but ive been reading on the Minute but they only have 120mm

    would 120mm be way to much of a jump or should I look for something closer to 100mm

    I ride mainly XC and some AM and some rock garden but im not a fast or lite weigh rider


    my last thought was to run 27.5 front wheel and fork

  77. #77
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    I'd stay on 100mm. Can't get a Minute 100 somewhere online?

  78. #78
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    New manitou 80-120mm is marvel, 120-140mm is minute now.

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