maintenance on an SPV fork- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    maintenance on an SPV fork

    I recently, broke the rebound adjusting knob off of my 3.5 year old Skareb Platinum (SPV). It looks like the metal knob is connected to a piece of plastic, and that plastic is what snapped. Yeah, I'm pretty strong.

    Now the fork is stuck in a position where the rebound is really slow. It needs to be fixed. Any idea what parts I'd have to buy? The fork could also use a general rebuild/overhaul, so I'd probably do that at the same time. Can an intermediate level mechanic such as myself work on an SPV fork, or am I better off just sending it to Manitou? If the latter, how much do you think it would cost and how long do you think it would take? Any first hand experience on the board?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by msugma
    I recently, broke the rebound adjusting knob off of my 3.5 year old Skareb Platinum (SPV). It looks like the metal knob is connected to a piece of plastic, and that plastic is what snapped. Yeah, I'm pretty strong.

    Now the fork is stuck in a position where the rebound is really slow. It needs to be fixed. Any idea what parts I'd have to buy? The fork could also use a general rebuild/overhaul, so I'd probably do that at the same time. Can an intermediate level mechanic such as myself work on an SPV fork, or am I better off just sending it to Manitou? If the latter, how much do you think it would cost and how long do you think it would take? Any first hand experience on the board?

    Thanks.
    That spot seems to be where most manitou's are broken. Cheap plastic innards are the culprit. My minute 1 also broke there but the knob stayed on, it just stripped the threads inside the rod. You need the entire spv piston rod assembly to fix it. You can fix it easily with an adjustable wrench and a few large sockets. I dont know if Manitou will send you the parts but you can call them and ask. They usually require you to take it to a shop. I think I checked into it and the cost was around $75.

  3. #3
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    Same experience

    Quote Originally Posted by msugma
    I recently, broke the rebound adjusting knob off of my 3.5 year old Skareb Platinum (SPV). It looks like the metal knob is connected to a piece of plastic, and that plastic is what snapped. Yeah, I'm pretty strong.

    Now the fork is stuck in a position where the rebound is really slow. It needs to be fixed. Any idea what parts I'd have to buy? The fork could also use a general rebuild/overhaul, so I'd probably do that at the same time. Can an intermediate level mechanic such as myself work on an SPV fork, or am I better off just sending it to Manitou? If the latter, how much do you think it would cost and how long do you think it would take? Any first hand experience on the board?

    Thanks.
    I had the same thing happen on my Minute 3 -- same reason as TheBronze mentioned in his post. Finally got the damper assembly a few days ago and will be finishing up the rebuild tomorrow. Go to the Answer Products site and click on the Tech Support link at the top of their homepage. Download the Service Manual for your fork. The instructions are well written and easy to follow. Here is the link: http://www.answerproducts.com/dynami...me=recall-main

    Also, go to the EnduroSeals web site for some excellent rebuild directions. They may not have instructions specificlly for the Skareb, but the Minute 1 directions have some good hints: http://www.enduroforkseals.com/

    Make sure that you have the correct SPV damping fluid for the upper fork leg. They spec Motorex semi-bath 5 wt. for the Minute SPV chamber -- it is pricey and somewhat hard to find, but you don't need much. It is very important to get the correct weight. The lower legs can be filled with pretty much any brand of synthetic motor oil. Here again, get the correct weight (Minute calls for 5-40W but the Skareb may be different). Just make sure that it says 100% Synthetic on the label. Also, pick up a tube of Manitou Prep M fork grease -- you will need it at several points during the rebuild. Cleaning the goo out of your lower fork legs (the oil tends to turn into a jelly-like consistency) may be problematic. A good degreaser plush a cheap nylon bottle brush will make the job a lot easier.

    It really ain't that bad of a job -- just go slowly and don't damage any O-rings. Good luck!

  4. #4
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    thanks

    Thanks for the replies guys. I think I'll man up and try to do these repairs myself.

  5. #5
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    I used Silkolene 5 wt with good results, so dont be stuck on the motorex brand. If you are doing the work yourself, be very carefull when installing the spv valve into the fork leg. Its almost a press fit. This is most noticeable on a new fork or one with a new spv valve seal. It helps to put the spv assembly in your refrigerator over night. It wont contract much but should be enough to help. Soaking the fork leg in hot water also might help. Greasing the fork leg to aid insertion might lead to gunking up the spv fluid and fouling the spv valve. I dont think its necessary, just dip the spv valve in the replacement fluid and make sure the inner fork leg is lubed with it too. Then rotate it as you push it up into the fork leg. If you are going to use the old spv valve, it might be smart to take it apart and grease it while the bike is down.

  6. #6
    pan
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    Mobil 1 5-40w

    Anyone tried or see any problems with using "Mobil 1" 5-40w synthetic for the oil bath? Its fully synthetic and available at Walmart cheap....but is designated as appropriate for diesel applications. Barring that, how about using the 5 weight fluid used for compression/rebound duties?

  7. #7
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    Yes -- I used it to fill the lower legs when I recently rebuilt my Minute 3 fork. I don't have too many miles on the bike since the rebuild, but so far/so good with the Mobil synthetic.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pan
    Anyone tried or see any problems with using "Mobil 1" 5-40w synthetic for the oil bath? Its fully synthetic and available at Walmart cheap....but is designated as appropriate for diesel applications. Barring that, how about using the 5 weight fluid used for compression/rebound duties?
    I just asked Manitou''s tech support about speeding up the rebound for my Min 2 SPVEvolve and they said that 2 or 2.5wt oil would speed it up.
    Too bad Push doesn't work on these, there are some things I feel better letting the pros do.
    Lou.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider
    I just asked Manitou''s tech support about speeding up the rebound for my Min 2 SPVEvolve and they said that 2 or 2.5wt oil would speed it up.
    Too bad Push doesn't work on these, there are some things I feel better letting the pros do.
    Lou.
    Changing the oil in you Minute's damper isn't all that difficult. All you need is a wrench, appropriate oil, something to measure the oil level and some great instructions provided by Enduro seals and you're set. Check out Ashwinearl's Manitou site, too. (link in my sig)


    Mobil1 - give 'er. No problem. You can also use a striaght 10wt synthetic if you want.
    I ..... need ..... DIRT!!!!!

    ... and cookies. :D

  10. #10
    pan
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    Naturally, a day after I spot Mobil 1 Syntec 5-40 oil at my local Walmart it's sold out. Luck was with me as they stocked Shell Rotella T 5-40 so I went with that. Test rode this evening with no issues (as expected), and according to the bottle I have some wicked "soot control" now which has buggered me for years.

    upstateSC-rider, I don't want to confuse you. I am only talking about using the 5-40 synthetic motor oil for the lower leg semibath fluid (16cc per leg). Your quote and post made me think you thought I was going to use the 5-40 as damper/shock oil, which I am definitely not.

    All this runaround stemmed from my LBS's becoming lazy and not stocking any shock fluids of any sort because it's easier for them to ship the fork back to the manufacturer for overhauls. Crock. And this because I decided to "devolve" my new Minute 3. The ride difference is awesome.

  11. #11
    SLX
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    Very good info here

    I was wondering if anyone has used 10w-40 oil or 20w-50 in an 05 spv evolve dampener. Would this be a bad Idea?

  12. #12
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    Bad idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by SLX
    Very good info here

    I was wondering if anyone has used 10w-40 oil or 20w-50 in an 05 spv evolve dampener. Would this be a bad Idea?
    If you are referring to the rebound damper located in the right (SPV) leg, then going to a higher viscosity oil of the weights you mentioned would drastically change your fork's performance. I suspect that the rebound damping would be so slow that the fork would pack up over stutter bumps. Manitou is very explicit about what oil to use in this damper (they recommend Motorex 5 wt., which is pricey). You should be able to use another brand of damping oil as long as it is the same weight. Just beware that a Motorex 5W may not have the same viscosity as a Torco or Redline 5W. For a very informative discussion of oils, go here: http://www.peterverdonedesigns.com/bikesuspension.htm

    You can probably get away with using the 10W-40 as a semi-bath oil in your fork lowers (Manitou recommends 5W-40) and the 20W-50 on top of the air piston in your LH fork leg -- as long as both are 100% synthetic.

  13. #13
    Harky
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    The problem with switching oil types on these Manitou SPV forks tis that the damping oil can bugger up the SPV valve. It's lubricated with a grease that can goo up in the wrong kind of damper oil. Then your SPV action turns to ****.
    The oil in the lowers can be any decent motor oil as its just for splash lubing the bushings... not involved in damping action...and on the Minute's and perhaps the Skareb..there is heavy grease on the coil spring to keep it from bangingh around inside the stanchion.
    For the poor guy that snapped the rebound control shaft...you will need to contact answer products and get a replacement damper assy (or live with it).

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