Fork Stiction & other stuff- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,001

    Fork Stiction & other stuff

    This past Monday we got caught in the pooring rain for the last 30 minutes of our ride, that was followed by a 45 minute drive home with my bike getting even wetter. Once home I dried the bike off as well as I could. I went out for a short ride on Wed. evening and the bike just felt like crap, the suspension was very stiff and the bike just felt off. Right now the bike is at the LBS getting the pivots lubed becuase I don't have a grease gun with a zerk attachment. I also plan on cleaning the drive train once I get the bike back tomorrow. What really concearns me is the newly devolped fork stiction. I am running a 145mm Manitou Nixon Super intrinsic that has been buttery smooth for the past year. But it now feels awful since all the rain on Monday. I am a bit worried that water or dirt may have gotten past the seal and into the fork. I am OK doing basic bike maintanance, but re-building a fork may beyond my abilities. Is there anything I can do without taking the fork apart that mat help or atleast diagnos the problem?

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,903
    taking forks apart is very easy. couple bolts and you're done.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by tomsmoto
    taking forks apart is very easy. couple bolts and you're done.
    ok, I undo a couple of bolts, then what?

  4. #4
    www.derbyrims.com
    Reputation: derby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,764
    Manitou has service manuals downloadable from their web site's Tech Support area.

    I'm not familiar with the air Nixon's, if like coil you'd have to first remove the rebound knob off the lower leg on one side then un-bolt both lower legs, one side is a bolt the other an allen which as I remember was reverse thread(?). Lay the fork horizontal to the ground to avoid spilling oil out and pull and slide the lowers away from the upper stanchions an inch or so, just enough to clear the inner rods you just unbolted. Pour out any remaining splash bath oil, and refill with about 16ml fresh oil using a large syringe or small plastc bottle with a very narrow neck to fit the holes (chain lube bottle?). Bolt back together and ride. The damper oil is removable from the top right cap (coil). Use multigrade 10-40w or there-about engine oil for the lowers and 5 to 7w fork oil for the damper (check specs for weight and specific amounts). The manual gives you pictures and better step-by-step.

    You should change your fork oil every 6 months if you ride very much, or more often if riding in dusty or wet conditions. So It's good to know how to do it to save time and money.
    Last edited by derby; 07-02-2009 at 11:49 AM.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,001
    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Manitou has service manuals downloadable from their web site's Tech Support area.

    I'm not familiar with the air Nixon's, if like coil you'd have to first remove the rebound knob off the lower leg on one side then un-bolt both lower legs, one side is a bolt the other an allen which as I remember was reverse thread(?). Lay the fork horizontal to the ground to avoid spilling oil out and pull and slide the lowers away from the upper stanchions an inch or so, just enough to clear the inner rods you just unbolted. Pour out any remaining splash bath oil, and refill with about 16ml fresh oil using a large syringe or small plastc bottle with a very narrow neck to fit the holes (chain lube bottle?). Bolt back together and ride. The damper oil is removable from the top right cap (coil). Use multigrade 10-40w or there-about engine oil for the lowers and 5 to 7w fork oil for the uppers (check specs for weight and specific amounts). The manual gives you pictures and better step-by-step.

    You should change your fork oil every 6 months if you ride very much, or more often if riding in dusty or wet conditions. So It's good to know how to do it to save time and money.

    Thanks, I found this on the Manitou site, see page 14 of the 2006 service guide
    http://www.manitoumtb.com/index.php?...service-guides

    My fork is a 2006 Nixon and uses the Intrinsic or CID damper. It looks as if service of the CID damper is a pain in the ass. But from what I read I think I should atleast be able to open the fork up and replace the semi-bath oil without messing with the damper catridge. If thats the case then I think I could handle that.

  6. #6
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,412
    Dont let disassembly instructions scare you. It's basic just like other forks once you start working on it. Sounds like the dust covers and seals got dry and need some lube. Moto dealers should have or can order the RaceTec seal lube or Rock Shox red rum. The Race Tech stuff is awesome. When replacing the fork fluid I suggest a Synthetic fluid like Maxima, Red Line or Showa. These fluids have the least amount of foaming which helps keep the fork consistent, no packing up.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    225
    I have been using the RaceTech stuff for years and it rules. Hands down a great investment.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,001
    I just received an email from Manitou telling me to us 5W40 synthetic oil for the semi-bath oil in the fork. Is that just standard motor oil?

    I just called my local MX shop and they have 5W40 oil that is a motor oil. As was also informed that fork oil is labled as 5W,7W, 10W.....no second number.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dougal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,424
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Mailloux
    I just received an email from Manitou telling me to us 5W40 synthetic oil for the semi-bath oil in the fork. Is that just standard motor oil?

    I just called my local MX shop and they have 5W40 oil that is a motor oil. As was also informed that fork oil is labled as 5W,7W, 10W.....no second number.
    Any good clean motor oil works fine. I've used 5w30 and 15w40 with equal success. The 5w30 gets spread around more easily.

    If your seals are worn, enduro make great replacements. I've ridden my nixon submerged (river crossings) and found no water inside afterwards.
    Owner of www.shockcraft.co.nz, Mech Engineer, Tuner, Manitou, Motorex, Vorsprung EPTC, SKF, Enduro
    www.dougal.co.nz

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dascro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,149
    Yeah that is motor oil. I use a full synthetic 5w40 motor oil designed for diesel engines. Since its just lube oil I don't think what you use matters all that much. Any reasonable quality synthetic oil should work. I use this same oil in all my semibath forks(RS and manitou) and have been very happy and the price is unbeatable.

  11. #11
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,412
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Mailloux
    I just received an email from Manitou telling me to us 5W40 synthetic oil for the semi-bath oil in the fork. Is that just standard motor oil?
    Sounds like it's time to do a oil and filter replace on the car.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,001
    I received an email back from Manitou stating that the most likely fix for my fork stiction problem was to replace the semi-bath oil. My fork is a 2006 model that I purchased last year and it was explained to me in the email from Manitou that the oil could have gone bad while the fork spent years sitting on a shelf somewhere. It was explained that the oil may have congealed over time. The Manitou Tech (Shannon) also typed out some simple instructions on how to go about changing the oil. So last night I decided to give this a try.

    The instruction I received were to undo the bolts on the bottom of the fork legs, drain the oil, and replace with 16cc of new oil in each leg. I was also told to pull the uppers out about half way before putting in the new oil. This all seemed pretty simple. When it came time to drain the semi-bath oil, the only oil that came out was from the rebound leg side and it was thin but a very dark color. Absolutely nothing came out from the air side of the leg. I shined a flashlight into the small bolt hole in the air side of the fork leg and could see that the inside was covered in a thick jelly like substance. Looks like the Manitou tech was right on the money, the fork oil had congealed. It was also the air side of the fork that had the worst stiction. So it looks like I found the source of the problem. I knew that I needed to clean this stuff out of the fork leg, but had no idea how to go about doing so without completely removing the fork lowers. So that is what I did. It took a bit more effort that I thought it would to separate the two half’s of the fork (upper & lowers). Using a flash light again I could see that the rebound side of the lower fork leg was nice and clean, while the air side was just nasty! I used some disposable lint free shop towels wrapped around the end of a wooden dowel to clean out both side of the fork lower legs. This took more time than anything. I must have gone though half a roll of shop towels on the gunked up air side alone. I also spent a few minutes cleaning up the bottom end of the air side fork stanchion and what I think was a the lower end of the air spring. They were both covered in congealed oil. I then cleaned and lubed the fork seals and reassembled the lower and upper half’s of the fork. It was a bit tricky getting the upper half of the fork legs through the lower fork seals. Using a plastic syringe I injected 16cc of fork oil in the lower half of each leg. I picked up a large syringed used to give kids medicine orally from the drug store, but it only had markings for tea spoons, and milliliters (ML). For those that don’t know, 1cc equals 1ml. After putting in the new oil I closed up the bottom of the fork, pumped the air chamber back up and put the fork back on the bike. The fork feels much better than it did, but still not as good as it has been. I am hoping that the new oil just needs a few rides to get worked in, so I am going to wait a couple of rides for final judgment.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,056
    Turn the bike upside down to get oil up into the sponge wiper and lube the seal. That should help with the stickiness. If there was not oil in the air side, I'm sure the seal is pretty dry.

  14. #14
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,412
    Those guys at Manitou are awesome!!!

    Good ride will help clear things up usually.
    Formotion Products
    http://www.formot

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FrankinMich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    334
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Mailloux
    ......I shined a flashlight into the small bolt hole in the air side of the fork leg and could see that the inside was covered in a thick jelly like substance. Looks like the Manitou tech was right on the money, the fork oil had congealed. ..........I used some disposable lint free shop towels wrapped around the end of a wooden dowel to clean out both side of the fork lower legs. This took more time than anything. I must have gone though half a roll of shop towels on the gunked up air side alone......
    Helpful hint -- If the fork oil has congealed, spray a liberal amount of a citrus degreaser (e.g. Zepp or Goo Gone orange gel) into the fork lowers and let it sit for a few minutes. Flush the lowers with hot water (hot water evaporates quicker) and turn the lowers upside down to drain. Repeat as necessary. I also use a bottle brush ($2 at your local hardware or grocery store) to scrub any stubborn lumps. Works great, with minimal effort.

  16. #16
    iBanGeDYoUrmOm,sOwHat?
    Reputation: ride.like.u.got.a.pair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    41
    hi guys; from reading your posts it sounds like we have some knowledgeable minds in here.
    ok, so i just bought a set of manitou nixon super 145 intrinsic forks, they are all black with black lowers and 20mm qr hex. (i cant tell if they are 05 or 06)
    i bought them off a budy who claims that they were just recently serviced and that he never had any problems with. the seals look fresh and there is that mushy goo residue on the fork when they actuate, my marz forks had the same stuff for the first couple rides after service and then they stayed dry.
    after reading the reviews on this fork, i am scared to say the least. it seems the 05s had a ton of problems. hopefully mine are the 06s....
    my problem is as follows; after installing them and riding up and down the street, they feel outstanding. but one thing i did notice is that when you sit on the bike, the fork slightly compresses (sag) and when you get off the bike, it extends like it is supposed to except for the last like 10mm if that. it kinda just sits there until you pick up on the bars. my marz forks did the same thing before service and after they fully extended when weight was removed.
    does this mean that the seals or foam rings are a bit dry?
    would the RaceTech stuff work to remove this problem?
    manitou tech support has always been great but they do take some time to reply so i figured this was a quicker consultation.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,001
    I am pretty sure that 2006 was the first year of the intrinsic forks. And you fork looks just like mine which is a 2006.

    Had my first ride since the oil change, fork feels so much better!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.