Changed from Fox RL to RLC and still feels harsh. Help & advice appreciated.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Changed from Fox RL to RLC and still feels harsh. Help & advice appreciated.

    Hey,

    I have a 2011 Giant Trance X2 which came with Giant specific 125mm Fox Float RL forks. I never got on with them and felt like they weren't doing much in the way of being a suspension fork for being out on the trails.

    I ended up getting 2011 Fox 140mm RLC FiT with Kashima coating and although I can feel they are better, I'm still not getting them to be "plush".

    I've tried altering pressure as well as compression and rebound but nothing that's made a dramatic difference. All alterations still make it feel like the forks don't take away any of the hit and transfer a lot of load through to my hands when riding harsh terrain.

    I'm 6"2 and 215 lbs and I've tried spring pressures from 80-120psi and I've also replaced the fluid with genuine Fox green oil 30cc both sides.

    Any help of advice would be really good as the weather here in Scotland is so good just now so I'm planning on getting out as much as I can

    David

  2. #2
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    Maybe a bleed of the fit damper would help. You could also try inverting the fork prior to rides so the foam rings can absorb some of the bath oil.

  3. #3
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    Even the RL's should have been fine.Especially on Giant OEM as they don't increase comp damping like some OEM's. If it came off Fleabay, make sure your RLC is not an OEM with a strange Comp tune. If it's not new get the oils changed and check it's not pumping oil from the lowers to above the air piston. I just got a 2nd hand RLC and it had no bath oil left. It was all above the air piston and it looked like engine oil in the fit cartridge. It rode like you desrcribed. It is now butter smooth. Too smooth, now I've got used to how my rev's ride.
    What air pressure are you running. I'm 160 lbs[nett] and on 2011 fox forks I run about 55 on 100mm forks and about 60 psi on 150's. On 2009 I run about 50 psi. So at 215 lbs I suspect you should be running about 75 to 80 psi. You need to do very small air pressure changes at a time with Fox forks. Needle width for the fine tune.

    Stick with it. The Tx is a great bike with a 140 on the front, especially running 650B.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davey G View Post
    I've tried altering pressure as well as compression and rebound but nothing that's made a dramatic difference. All alterations still make it feel like the forks don't take away any of the hit and transfer a lot of load through to my hands when riding harsh terrain.

    'Taking away the hit' is high speed compression. The only way to do that on Float 32 forks is with lowering the air pressure.

    Load into the hands through harsh terrain is actually low speed compression, since it is body feedback. You want to see your fork with as little low speed compression as possible for this, but the lower you go, the more you will also experience brake dive and squat when pedaling. Chances are, though, that it isn't really a low speed compression issue, and really more that you are riding choppy areas too tense/rigid in your body.

    So here is my suggestion for you:
    * Forget about sage percentages and PSI #'s. Lower your air pressure as low as you can until you start to bottom out your fork.
    * After setting this, you may need to increase the LSC setting to something so that your fork doesn't squat too much when pedaling.
    * Rebound is going to be tricky to set until you have some experience of how you want the fork to feel. The rule of thumb is as fast as you can stand before it feels like a pogo stick. Ride with it all the way out, and all the way in, to understand the feel, and then tune to what you like from there. Finding a drop into a choppy section to session would be the best for this, since you get to see how it reacts to a big hit, and then successive harsh hits.
    * Stay loose, off the brakes, over the BB, and let the bike do what it wants. This is probably the most important thing to do.

    If you still have issues after this, get a bike with a longer travel fork; ideally one with a high speed compression setting.
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  5. #5
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    Well this goes back to my rant about crappy Fox forks. Unless you want to spend more money and send them off to be modified or at the very least take them apart and check it has the correct oil levels etc and possibly modifying the air volume they will never feel good. I would suggest doing what I did and sell off the Fox and get something else. I have two X Fusion forks and they are worlds better than Fox at a fraction of the price. I have also had better results with RockShox. Imagine a fork that is good out of the box? it does exist just not with Fox

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevehollx View Post
    'Taking away the hit' is high speed compression. The only way to do that on Float 32 forks is with lowering the air pressure.

    Load into the hands through harsh terrain is actually low speed compression, since it is body feedback. You want to see your fork with as little low speed compression as possible for this, but the lower you go, the more you will also experience brake dive and squat when pedaling. Chances are, though, that it isn't really a low speed compression issue, and really more that you are riding choppy areas too tense/rigid in your body.

    So here is my suggestion for you:
    * Forget about sage percentages and PSI #'s. Lower your air pressure as low as you can until you start to bottom out your fork.
    * After setting this, you may need to increase the LSC setting to something so that your fork doesn't squat too much when pedaling.
    * Rebound is going to be tricky to set until you have some experience of how you want the fork to feel. The rule of thumb is as fast as you can stand before it feels like a pogo stick. Ride with it all the way out, and all the way in, to understand the feel, and then tune to what you like from there. Finding a drop into a choppy section to session would be the best for this, since you get to see how it reacts to a big hit, and then successive harsh hits.
    * Stay loose, off the brakes, over the BB, and let the bike do what it wants. This is probably the most important thing to do.

    If you still have issues after this, get a bike with a longer travel fork; ideally one with a high speed compression setting.
    Good advice the only rub is that to get these forks to feel anything close to plush you have to run such low pressure that it sags 50% or more, steepens your head angle and lowers your BB. I feel that is just unacceptable. It's a crap fork, no offense to the OP. Again this is very good advice and may be your only hope unless you spend more money and have them modded

  7. #7
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    How many rides have you had on the new fork? It needs a few to break in. I have a 150 RLC and have found the Fox-recommended pressures to work best with zero to 2 clicks of low speed compression. I think the rebound is ~8 clicks from full fast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shift96 View Post
    Good advice the only rub is that to get these forks to feel anything close to plush you have to run such low pressure that it sags 50% or more, steepens your head angle and lowers your BB. I feel that is just unacceptable. It's a crap fork, no offense to the OP. Again this is very good advice and may be your only hope unless you spend more money and have them modded
    Rubbish. I'm pretty sure I'm only running 25 to 30% sag.
    Learn how to weight shift if your worried about fork dive.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by shift96 View Post
    Well this goes back to my rant about crappy Fox forks. Unless you want to spend more money and send them off to be modified or at the very least take them apart and check it has the correct oil levels etc and possibly modifying the air volume they will never feel good. I would suggest doing what I did and sell off the Fox and get something else. I have two X Fusion forks and they are worlds better than Fox at a fraction of the price. I have also had better results with RockShox. Imagine a fork that is good out of the box? it does exist just not with Fox
    Sounds like you've only ever used 08 Fox forks. That's the only one I've ever had that needed an air chamber mod. Wish my RS Rev's were as smooth as any of my Fox forks.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevehollx View Post
    'Taking away the hit' is high speed compression. The only way to do that on Float 32 forks is with lowering the air pressure.

    Load into the hands through harsh terrain is actually low speed compression, since it is body feedback. You want to see your fork with as little low speed compression as possible for this, but the lower you go, the more you will also experience brake dive and squat when pedaling. Chances are, though, that it isn't really a low speed compression issue, and really more that you are riding choppy areas too tense/rigid in your body.

    So here is my suggestion for you:
    * Forget about sage percentages and PSI #'s. Lower your air pressure as low as you can until you start to bottom out your fork.
    * After setting this, you may need to increase the LSC setting to something so that your fork doesn't squat too much when pedaling.
    * Rebound is going to be tricky to set until you have some experience of how you want the fork to feel. The rule of thumb is as fast as you can stand before it feels like a pogo stick. Ride with it all the way out, and all the way in, to understand the feel, and then tune to what you like from there. Finding a drop into a choppy section to session would be the best for this, since you get to see how it reacts to a big hit, and then successive harsh hits.
    * Stay loose, off the brakes, over the BB, and let the bike do what it wants. This is probably the most important thing to do.

    If you still have issues after this, get a bike with a longer travel fork; ideally one with a high speed compression setting.
    On a F140 ,I'd leave up to 3/8" of travel on most trails. The extra 3/8" for extreme drops over the bar type experience or hitting the lip of a tabletop.Should still have plenty of smooth mid range. Yes and a bit of brake dive. On a F100 I'd be looking to use all the travel.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gvs_nz View Post
    Even the RL's should have been fine.Especially on Giant OEM as they don't increase comp damping like some OEM's. If it came off Fleabay, make sure your RLC is not an OEM with a strange Comp tune. If it's not new get the oils changed and check it's not pumping oil from the lowers to above the air piston. I just got a 2nd hand RLC and it had no bath oil left. It was all above the air piston and it looked like engine oil in the fit cartridge. It rode like you desrcribed. It is now butter smooth. Too smooth, now I've got used to how my rev's ride.
    What air pressure are you running. I'm 160 lbs[nett] and on 2011 fox forks I run about 55 on 100mm forks and about 60 psi on 150's. On 2009 I run about 50 psi. So at 215 lbs I suspect you should be running about 75 to 80 psi. You need to do very small air pressure changes at a time with Fox forks. Needle width for the fine tune.
    I bought the 140 new from Merlin cycles here in the UK. They are a large reputable company. When i got the fork i checked and changed the oil levels as I've heard about the issue with fox forks and their oil levels.

    I run about 95psi on most days now. Down from 110 on the old RL fork.


    Quote Originally Posted by stevehollx View Post
    'Taking away the hit' is high speed compression. The only way to do that on Float 32 forks is with lowering the air pressure.

    Load into the hands through harsh terrain is actually low speed compression, since it is body feedback. You want to see your fork with as little low speed compression as possible for this, but the lower you go, the more you will also experience brake dive and squat when pedaling. Chances are, though, that it isn't really a low speed compression issue, and really more that you are riding choppy areas too tense/rigid in your body.

    So here is my suggestion for you:
    * Forget about sage percentages and PSI #'s. Lower your air pressure as low as you can until you start to bottom out your fork.
    * After setting this, you may need to increase the LSC setting to something so that your fork doesn't squat too much when pedaling.
    * Rebound is going to be tricky to set until you have some experience of how you want the fork to feel. The rule of thumb is as fast as you can stand before it feels like a pogo stick. Ride with it all the way out, and all the way in, to understand the feel, and then tune to what you like from there. Finding a drop into a choppy section to session would be the best for this, since you get to see how it reacts to a big hit, and then successive harsh hits.
    * Stay loose, off the brakes, over the BB, and let the bike do what it wants. This is probably the most important thing to do.

    If you still have issues after this, get a bike with a longer travel fork; ideally one with a high speed compression setting.
    Thanks for the advice. I'll be sure to check all that out when I'm next heading out on the bike and post back the experience.

    I understand suspension is a individual thing for people on bikes but it's hard to believe that Fox would be able to produce a poor fork. I know the service intervals are short but it's all the in best interest in keeping a performance part in the best possible condition. Coming from an automotive field i know this as I've dealt with Ohlins.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheatgerm View Post
    How many rides have you had on the new fork? It needs a few to break in. I have a 150 RLC and have found the Fox-recommended pressures to work best with zero to 2 clicks of low speed compression. I think the rebound is ~8 clicks from full fast.
    I've had about 5 or 6 rides on the forks, can't remember exactly. Those rides being between 3-4 hours and i've been trying different settings throughout.

    I will try what's been mentioned above and see how i feels after a few more rides.

    I don't mind sending the fork away to be custom valved if it makes them feel how they are described in magazines but i just feel that with all the adjustments it has, it shouldn't need it.

  13. #13
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    Your pressure looks to high to me. I try and eliminate one thing at at time. Your fork will compress more when you eliminate compresson damping. To do that do a roll in off a 2 to 3 foot ramp.Most learner areas have some ramps. Have all your weight forward. Push, but don't pump fast with your arms. You should be close to bottoming the fork. Don't do it off a drop you will actualy use less travel and probably end up over the bars. Usually that wil be the closest you will ever get to bottoming out your fork. I bet it's lower than what you are running now and should be close to 30% sag. Don't go any lower. Low pressure can actually get harsher as high speed compression kicks in more with higher shaft speed. Striking the happy medium is what it's all about. Midstroke of a fork is the workhorse. Running over rough ground and sucking up sharp edge hits all happens in the midstroke. It's usually slow hits and drops or picking your way down step technical DH which pushs you in to the top end of the travel.

    Set your rebound about 1/2 way is a good start and back off all low speed comp damping. On any fork it will introduce some level of spiking compared to tweaking the air pressure.

    Give it a run.If it still too harsh then just try a run with higher or lower rebound to eliminate that.

    Tweak the pressure down or up 5 psi or less at a time to fine tune it. Try not to introduce any low speed compression at all. Just use air pressure initially. Try dialling in some at some stage and see how they react.

    If its not a kashima coated RLC then it is a OEM fork and could have a higher compression damping than normal. You may have to try lighter oil or revalving. One of my 2011 OEM RLC 140 forks actually runs smoother with a 09 aftermarket RL damper.

    Don't forget it's a mtb and not a motorcycle. Plushness is relative.
    Last edited by gvs_nz; 05-25-2012 at 11:15 PM.

  14. #14
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    Davey G, how was the oil level in your new fork?

    I just received my Fox 34 Talas 140mm 29er fork and I always check oil levels.

    It had only 15mm (should be 30mm) in the damper side and Zero

    oil in spring side (should be 10mm).

    The oil was way off also in my 2009 Fox 36 Talas 160 RC2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    Davey G, how was the oil level in your new fork?

    I just received my Fox 34 Talas 140mm 29er fork and I always check oil levels.

    It had only 15mm (should be 30mm) in the damper side and Zero

    oil in spring side (should be 10mm).

    The oil was way off also in my 2009 Fox 36 Talas 160 RC2.
    I never measured it exactly when it came out but thinking back i would say it was lower than 30cc. When i first did the change i thought there should be 160cc inside so at that point i thought it was mega low.

  16. #16
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    Sounds like you wanted a coil.

    Another recommendation on lowering the air pressure about 10psi and see how it feels.

  17. #17
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    Another thing to check is the air chamber. Make sure the fork fluid hasn't migrated into the air chamber increasing the amount of (float Blue fluid) this is pretty common and will screw with your setting and eliminate full travel etc.

    Happened on my 2012 F120, the chamber had 10cc of fluid after replacing the fluid with 3cc's of the blue stuff the fork was like night and day!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davey G View Post
    I never measured it exactly when it came out but thinking back i would say it was lower than 30cc. When i first did the change i thought there should be 160cc inside so at that point i thought it was mega low.
    I could be wrong (won't be the first time) but I think you should only have 30mm
    of oil for a Fit cartridge damper. The table is confusing tho.
    Look at #27.

    Here's the link:WebHelp
    Need to scroll to the bottom to find oil volumes.

  19. #19
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    Well, I'll throw in my considerations anyway even though there are already many posts on the subject.

    Since you migrated from two forks and keep complaining about similar issues I would bet to rule out hardware issues. They are possible indeed, but first you should eliminate all other possibilities and only then look into the hardware.

    Lets suppose however that the fork has been following service interval recommendations.

    Needless to say things should be done following an order. Going and changing stuff randomly only adds to the confusion.

    Opposed to what many say, I find that sag values should be upmost respected. They are the first tuning line of a fork and at the same time one of the general recommendations of manufacturers for proper enjoyment of a suspension. Also, they can help you have the general ideia if everything is working as it should.

    So, what sag are you running? Being sure of the value would help. Betting it is around X value just isn't right. For a 140mm Float and if you wish for a plush ride you should be running 35mm sag.

    After certifying that the sag is correctly set, it would help when setting it having the fork other options at factory setting just for the sake of debugging. Afterwards I would set all the other options to their softer settings, hop in the bike and I would cycle the fork, harshly, a few times just to be sure that I would be able to get full travel. Full travel obviously isn't right at the limit of the stanchions. Common sense dictates it. If you can't get it, then some thing internally has to be changed..

    But let's suppose you can.

    Set the LSC and rebound to their factory settings once again and go for a ride. I've found that the best way to check for those adjustments is to ride on a bumpy road with the sun creating some lateral shade and looking into the shade gap that the tire sometimes leaves when it loses contact with the ground.

    There should be some dive, therefore LSC should be kind of soft. Otherwise the fork will just feel like it has poor terrain reading abilities. You'll notice that especially on hard-packed roads. Rebound has no secrets, dial it in so the wheel makes the best contact to the ground without being to active or packing up. Compress the fork, stationary, at the side of the bike, and quickly release it. The rebound speed should be around somewhere when the tire almost comes off the ground because of the rebound being to quick. That obviously is a general guideline and on the terrain usually one/two clicks either way are necessary for a better adjustment.

    If all this fails, then you should look into the internals but now with proper knowledge and a better ideia of which behavior you are looking into tuning.

    Just my 0.02 cents!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    I could be wrong (won't be the first time) but I think you should only have 30mm
    of oil for a Fit cartridge damper. The table is confusing tho.
    Look at #27.

    Here's the link:WebHelp
    Need to scroll to the bottom to find oil volumes.
    I think you wanted to post this link:

    Oil Volumes

    According to the table, nš27 forks should have nowhere near 160cc of oil. 33.6 red for the damper, 30 green for the damper and spring oil bath and 5cc float for the air chamber.

    If too much oil was added its perfectly comprehensible that the fork will perform poorly, especially compression wise.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    I think you wanted to post this link:

    Oil Volumes

    According to the table, nš27 forks should have nowhere near 160cc of oil. 33.6 red for the damper, 30 green for the damper and spring oil bath and 5cc float for the air chamber.

    If too much oil was added its perfectly comprehensible that the fork will perform poorly, especially compression wise.
    I'm thinking the OP's fork would be fork #32 according to your link and #27 with my link.
    160mm would be way to much oil then!

    Like I said, it can be confusing . lol

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    I'm thinking the OP's fork would be fork #32 according to your link and #27 with my link.
    160mm would be way to much oil then!

    Like I said, it can be confusing . lol
    Correct. Since Fox overhauled their site that haven't properly dealt with duplicate pages, contact address and such.

    27 or 32 depending which page you're looking at. You just have to things with calm and pay attention. Keeping some personal notes also helps, at least prevents having to re-check data online often.

  23. #23
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    its an air fork, they all pack up, feel harsh, and chattery in rough terrain. Deal with it. At 215 pounds I would recommend 75-80psi with 3-4 clicks of compression for a plush ride. Also about 30 psi in the front tire(should have a little give when squeezing the sidewall with your hand, not too squishy, not too firm)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    its an air fork, they all pack up, feel harsh, and chattery in rough terrain. Deal with it. At 215 pounds I would recommend 75-80psi with 3-4 clicks of compression for a plush ride. Also about 30 psi in the front tire(should have a little give when squeezing the sidewall with your hand, not too squishy, not too firm)
    Eye-o-meter configurations never work right unless they are done for the self with prior knowledge of personal taste and correlation between settings and hardware behavior.

    You don't know how he rides the bike nor how he his seated, you don't know in what temperatures or elevation he is riding and to an air fork even though minimal, it makes a difference. Also you don't know what tires he is using and optimal tire pressures vary a lot according to models.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    Eye-o-meter configurations never work right unless they are done for the self with prior knowledge of personal taste and correlation between settings and hardware behavior.

    You don't know how he rides the bike nor how he his seated, you don't know in what temperatures or elevation he is riding and to an air fork even though minimal, it makes a difference. Also you don't know what tires he is using and optimal tire pressures vary a lot according to models.
    blah blah blah blah. No need to over analyze things. He's complaining its harsh, its a mountain bike fork, not a space shuttle. He needs to bump the air pressure down a bit to get it plusher. Nobody can give exact advice over internet. He has to figure all those details out for himself. All we can do is give parameters and guidelines.

    He gonna spend more time scratching his head with all these intricate examinations when its not that complicated.

    Ride more, think less.

  26. #26
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    And oversimplifying often leads to people ranting about how shitty their product feels just because they haven't taken the time to properly understand how stuff works and configure it accordingly.

    There are two schools on how to use and ride stuff. We're obviously on opposite sides. I'm just tired of people around me, in real life, complaining that this fork or that shock suck just because they didn't dialed them properly. Heck, extreme cases didn't even knew stuff had such configuration possibilities.

    Tune it up once and well and then you're set.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    its an air fork, they all pack up, feel harsh, and chattery in rough terrain. Deal with it. At 215 pounds I would recommend 75-80psi with 3-4 clicks of compression for a plush ride. Also about 30 psi in the front tire(should have a little give when squeezing the sidewall with your hand, not too squishy, not too firm)
    Some day get yourself a better fork and you will start to see things differently...

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davey G View Post
    I never measured it exactly when it came out but thinking back i would say it was lower than 30cc. When i first did the change i thought there should be 160cc inside so at that point i thought it was mega low.
    If it's a 2011 RLC it should have a FIT cartridge. In which case it should have only 30cc in each leg. If it hasn't got a fit cartridge than it is a OEM mongrel fork and it could have any sort of OEM spec compression damping.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    Well, I'll throw in my considerations anyway even though there are already many posts on the subject.

    Since you migrated from two forks and keep complaining about similar issues I would bet to rule out hardware issues. They are possible indeed, but first you should eliminate all other possibilities and only then look into the hardware.

    Just my 0.02 cents!
    Common link seems too much air pressure. All fork mfg recommended air pressures are too high. I suspect it's a litigation issue. Don't recommend too low an air pressure or they may OTB and sue our ar**.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gvs_nz View Post
    Common link seems too much air pressure. All fork mfg recommended air pressures are too high. I suspect it's a litigation issue. Don't recommend too low an air pressure or they may OTB and sue our ar**.
    Is it time to get my tin foil hat?

    Mfg recommendations are guidelines. As a rider it's your duty to follow the procedures to determine whats your proper, in which personal preference also plays a part, air pressure.

    People that follow recommendations like, double your weight in PSI and go ride are bound to have poor experiences. Only a small percentage are lucky enough for that formula to work nicely.

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    Like recommended tire pressures . Once again that's to do with rating specifications rather than real world riding. Don't think there's too many tire mfg's recommending letting them down till they nearly squirm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gvs_nz View Post
    Like recommended tire pressures . Once again that's to do with rating specifications rather than real world riding. Don't think there's too many tire mfg's recommending letting them down till they nearly squirm.
    That wouldn't even be a good idea since they would get torn to shreds too fast. Imagine what that would do to a brands rep, everyone saying that their tire doesn't last for crap. Not even mentioning the dangers of a tire coming of the rim.

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    The fork does have 30cc in it, not 160.

    I've set sag upper and lower to what it should be and i've only ever went down to 80psi so i will try even lower than that.

    Thanks for everyone's input.

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    What's the point in doing so if you're already going under the recommended values. I seriously don't understand such point.

    How much do you weight? And as someone already asked earlier, where is your fork from? Its a valid question as it may have influence regarding compression tune.

    And by harshness what do you mean? Could you be more precise? LSC or HSC bias or overall?

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    Well when you read about people running Fox forks with less or more sag/psi than stated by the manufacturer be it on the forums or magazines why would i not want to see what happens?

    Quote Originally Posted by Davey G View Post
    I bought the 140 new from Merlin cycles here in the UK. They are a large reputable company.
    Quote Originally Posted by Davey G View Post
    I'm 6"2 and 215 lbs
    I mean by harshness that the forks doesn't appear to be taking away the feel of a rocky section by absorbing the bumps and even with the rebound set to fast it still packs up.

  36. #36
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    80psi is about the magic spot for your weight. go under 70psi and that thing is gonna blow thru the travel like no other. Do you have a picture of the Bike from the side angle? The oil mitigation issue is valid, but that usually cause the fork to get harsh farther into its travel.

    Check the sag as well, if you stand off the pedals and lean forward you should be shooting for about %30.

  37. #37
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    People may run with less or more air pressure than the one recommended for their weight because of riding style, bike and many other variables. However I wouldn't go too far from the recommended sag values. Those are an indication of how the fork should sit on its travel while stationary with your weight. Having more not only takes some mm from your travel as it will create a bigger rebound cycle and a tougher time to stabilize. Having less, it will just make harder to get full travel and overall the ride will be very firm. Under normal conditions any of those options should be avoided. Obviously there are personal preferences that should be taken into account and some people may prefer to ride in those manners.

    I feel compelled to point that you may be a kind of guy that enjoys coil forks more. But thats just a supposition. You're on the heavy side, that poses some issues but then there are heavier people riding. You can't expect a cushion feel. The fork dampens irregularities but you will always feel some to some extent.

    What are your shock tuning options? May it be too soft and it doesn't balance out with the front of the bike?

    Even with the fork being harsh, can you achieve full travel?

    If I were you I would do one thing though. Swap the oil once more, Green and Red have the same wattage however red is slightly heavier, but not that much. Thats why you haven't noticed anything different. If you're not worried about warranty you can always check the forums about the oil threads and choose one with a higher viscosity and try it out in the damper. From what you're saying you're problems are only related to damping. But thats quite a drastic measure to be taken just yet.

    How would you describe your rebound speed?

    Take a look at this video. This similar fork seems to be nicely dialed in.

    Fox 32 Float RL Working - GoPro 960 - YouTube

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    80psi is about the magic spot for your weight. go under 70psi and that thing is gonna blow thru the travel like no other. Do you have a picture of the Bike from the side angle? The oil mitigation issue is valid, but that usually cause the fork to get harsh farther into its travel.

    Check the sag as well, if you stand off the pedals and lean forward you should be shooting for about %30.
    Sag is measured sitting in a normal riding position. Applying weight to the front of the bike will one result in an improper reading.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Davey G View Post
    I mean by harshness that the forks doesn't appear to be taking away the feel of a rocky section by absorbing the bumps and even with the rebound set to fast it still packs up.
    This makes it sound like you are running too much rebound. If that's the case, the fork will take initial hits well, but will feel harsh over following bumps - like on a rocky downhill section.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    Sag is measured sitting in a normal riding position. Applying weight to the front of the bike will one result in an improper reading.
    Nope. Wrong. Sitting in a seated pedaling position works for rear sag but not the front. Standing off pedals in attack position, neutrally balanced, is the way to check front sag. Im not an internet hero, i know how to setup bikes and ride them. Trust me on this.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    Nope. Wrong. Sitting in a seated pedaling position works for rear sag but not the front. Standing off pedals in attack position, neutrally balanced, is the way to check front sag. Im not an internet hero, i know how to setup bikes and ride them. Trust me on this.
    I don't mean to embarrass you but there is no difference on how to measure front or rear sag. Procedure is exactly the same in order to guarantee that the bike gets and even and balanced feeling. I'm sorry but I can't trust you. Your previous posts already let me know that we're worlds apart on how we approach fiddling with our bikes.

    Your procedure to determine frontal sag will turn out flawed since you're not evenly distributing the load through the bike. I don't blame you though. This is one of the things were there are the most misconceptions on how to properly do it.

    FWIW, taken directly from Fox, specifically for the 2012 Float 32 line of forks and if your search for other mfg recommendations I reckon they won't be far off. Depiste the OP fork being a 2011 fork the manual states exactly the same thing.


  42. #42
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    You keep following all ur manufacturer recommendations and have fun with that. I rarely ever measure sag, i go by feel and psi comparisons, but whe i do check sag thats how i do it. Same on my motorycles. Im all done with the internet semantics.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yody View Post
    You keep following all ur manufacturer recommendations and have fun with that. I rarely ever measure sag, i go by feel and psi comparisons, but whe i do check sag thats how i do it. Same on my motorycles. Im all done with the internet semantics.
    There are standardized ways to do stuff and not so standardized ways to do stuff. But in the end opinions are like asses, everyone has one.

    Keep cool.


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