Body geometry and fork travels- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    579

    Body geometry and fork travels

    Just some comments regarding forks, lengths and fork angles. I bought a 105mm Marz Comp ETA for building up on an NRS. I found the issue wasn't that it changed the angle appreciably from the standard 80mm...adding an inch to the fork height doesn't change the angle much at all. The issue was how "plush" it was. The front end felt very different from the back of the bike, which has that stiff, HT feeling until you hit a serious bump. I swapped the Bomber for a 80-100mm Manitou Black Elite and found it to be a much better match. The Black is stiff and firm. With the Black, the NRS doesn't bob up and down at the front like the Bomber did. I've got a plusher FS, an older GT i-drive which I think will be a better fit for the Bomber.

  2. #2
    Jm.
    Jm. is offline

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,131
    Quote Originally Posted by Disaster
    Just some comments regarding forks, lengths and fork angles. I bought a 105mm Marz Comp ETA for building up on an NRS. I found the issue wasn't that it changed the angle appreciably from the standard 80mm...adding an inch to the fork height doesn't change the angle much at all. The issue was how "plush" it was. The front end felt very different from the back of the bike, which has that stiff, HT feeling until you hit a serious bump. I swapped the Bomber for a 80-100mm Manitou Black Elite and found it to be a much better match. The Black is stiff and firm. With the Black, the NRS doesn't bob up and down at the front like the Bomber did. I've got a plusher FS, an older GT i-drive which I think will be a better fit for the Bomber.
    The NRS is sort of unique though. It is very stiff as you say, because it's made to be ridden with zero sag, so that it won't bob. Even the SPV or fox TIV shocks are not going to be a good match, because while they'll pedal excellent, you can't match the over-sprung suspension of the NRS unless you simply put a much stiffer spring in there.

    This doesn't apply to most bikes though, because most bikes are active suspension designs and they have sag designed into them. The "hardtail like" efficiancy of the NRS can be it's downfall easily, when you are climbing a rough ascent and you can't get enough traction because the rear wheel simply spins out from a lack of traction.

    Those people with shorter travel active designs like FSRs and such will simply use similer travel forks that should generally feel pretty close to the rear.

  3. #3
    just along for the ride
    Reputation: Brown_Teeth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,033
    You can try tuning in the zoke with differnet oil weight/level but if the black works just slapped on well ride it. I found using a bike that has both adjustable travel and height that I prefer riding a heavily raked front ( ~65 degrees) with a stiffer rear spring set at maximum travel. Trick now is to find a shock that can handle more travel on a dropping shock rate yet still be stiff enough to ride uphill. Enjoy!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-23-2004, 01:00 PM
  2. 5Spot/Maverick fork?
    By Deano in forum Maverick
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-31-2003, 02:11 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.