Air shock paired with Coil Fork???- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8

    Air shock paired with Coil Fork???

    Anyone out there that could shed some light on this matter.

    I recently purchased a totem (still in the boX), but afraid to use it quite yet.

    I have read a lot of posts pertaining to coil shocks and air fork, but not vice versa.
    If there is a forum that I have seem to have overlooked, please direct me!

    I have a new vivid air with new totem. PS(Too good of a deal to pass up on the totem, had to get it).

    Thanks

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,055
    Quote Originally Posted by Skibeejeebees View Post
    Anyone out there that could shed some light on this matter.

    I recently purchased a totem (still in the boX), but afraid to use it quite yet.

    I have read a lot of posts pertaining to coil shocks and air fork, but not vice versa.
    If there is a forum that I have seem to have overlooked, please direct me!

    I have a new vivid air with new totem. PS(Too good of a deal to pass up on the totem, had to get it).

    Thanks
    What's exactly your question ? Doesn't matter what type of spring system you run as long as you have the proper rate for your weight and riding style.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by keen View Post
    What's exactly your question ? Doesn't matter what type of spring system you run as long as you have the proper rate for your weight and riding style.
    Being relatively new to the sport, I haven't experienced anything other than an air fork and small coil in the rear. Ive read numerous threads that express importance in keeping both air, or both coil, or in some cases coil in rear, air in front. But nothing really on air in the back, coil in front.

    So i guess it got me thinking... Maybe it's because no one really prefers coil in the front and air in the rear, in which case maybe I shouldn't either.

    It makes perfect since that as long as the suspension is dialed in, it shouldn't make a difference really.

    Just thought Id address the issue.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    And I'm out.
    Reputation: TheBikeMechanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    500
    Hm... interesting question.... I've never ridden both spring types at the same time but I don't see why having both types on the same bike is going to make that much of a difference.... to a very experienced rider with a lot of riding time...maybe yes...but for most people just riding: set it up balanced and to suit your riding style / level / terrain type and weight. Keep notes of your settings and what you liked about the suspension settings and what you didn't like and make adjustments from there to where you want it to be!!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,055
    Quote Originally Posted by Skibeejeebees View Post
    Being relatively new to the sport, I haven't experienced anything other than an air fork and small coil in the rear. Ive read numerous threads that express importance in keeping both air, or both coil, or in some cases coil in rear, air in front. But nothing really on air in the back, coil in front.

    So i guess it got me thinking... Maybe it's because no one really prefers coil in the front and air in the rear, in which case maybe I shouldn't either.

    It makes perfect since that as long as the suspension is dialed in, it shouldn't make a difference really.

    Just thought Id address the issue.

    Thanks
    I prefer to treat the front and rear suspension as two completely independent systems. I have read this term "balance" in a few threads now and it still makes me scratch my head. Get the spring rates correct for your weight / riding style then adjust the dampers for the best control. I doubt any tuner would detune the front or rear to get a "balance". When it comes to rear shocks frame manufactures will spec. custom tunes or say they are better suited to the progressive nature of the air shock. My current bike has a coil fork and air rear and it performs great.

  6. #6
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,716
    I've been riding air rear/coil front since '05 or so. I have no complaints. Sometimes net talk is just that. I guess my point is don't fret mix and match....many many many of us do it. There are valid reasons for choosing one over the other (air vs. coil) but compatibility is really one of them imo.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    9,286
    Quote Originally Posted by Skibeejeebees View Post
    Being relatively new to the sport, I haven't experienced anything other than an air fork and small coil in the rear. Ive read numerous threads that express importance in keeping both air, or both coil, or in some cases coil in rear, air in front. But nothing really on air in the back, coil in front.
    I think you might have misread those threads, or people are just talking BS!

    The only advantage to air at either end is weight, but if you're not concerned about weight, coil really does ride better.

    I ride a coil fork and air shock. I like it. Id rather have a coil shock too.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8
    Loving the feedback, my conscience is now clear.

  9. #9
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,716
    Quote Originally Posted by Skibeejeebees View Post
    Loving the feedback, my conscience is now clear.

    If that Totem is anything like the coil Lyrik your gonna love it!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: trailbildr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,818
    What matters is the spring RATE, not what it is made of. Rear shocks have either a progressive (exponential) or linear (linear) rate. Coil is always linear in the bike world in the rear (VERY few exceptions) and air can be linear or progressive. In the front, it's all about the design (with coil being always progressive.

    Vivid Air and Vivid (coil) have the exact same spring RATE, even though one is air and one is coil. As mentioned, the big difference is weight.

    A Totem has a large volume of air when it starts out and a comparatively large volume at the end of the stroke (compared to SID or Revelation, for example). This means that the spring rate ramps up less as you compress it, leading to a more linear rate. It ramps up, sure, but less than forks designed for different types of riding. For the coil version, it ramps up based on the coil spring only, and only slightly. Set up and maintained properly, the coil and air version of this fork do not feel significantly different when riding, only in weight.

    I prefer air shocks (front and rear) so you can get them dialed as compared to a coil spring where adjustment means you have to buy a new spring. Preloading a coil spring does not affect the spring rate at all, it just makes your rebound circuit work that much harder.

    mk

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    744
    I've noticed that coil forks and shocks are generally cheaper than their air counterparts. The difference is usually enough to be able to buy 1 replacement spring. This at least allows you to select a proper spring rate and end up at a relatively similar cost to air. If you're buying coil then you already accept the weight penalty. You'll take a hit on the used market though as air seems to sell better.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3,048
    I disagree with those saying that most people can't tell a difference mixing and matching air and coil suspension. I am an experienced, but ultimately average rider, in my opinion. I have riddenn a Pike Dual Air with a Fox DHX5.0 coil, a Lyrik coil with a Rockshox Monarch RT3 air shock, Sektor Solo Air with both a Monarch and Fox Float rear, and various other forks and shocks, and a coil has always felt more plush and reactive than air, especially while rebounding. Yes, I spent a lot of time adjusting and dialing in the rebound, but it is very difficult to get a coil and air suspension balanced. I hate having a rear end that's more reactive than the front, which is why I rarely prefer a coil shock. Coil fork and air shock is great, in my opinion.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mullen119's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    4,681
    I agree with Keen and One Pivot. You can use any type of spring you want, it really doesnt matter as long as they are set up properly. I prefer coil, but have have mixed set ups in the past. As long as you take the time to properly set up your suspension, you will get good performance.

  14. #14
    Trail Gnome
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4,165
    Quote Originally Posted by Skibeejeebees View Post
    Anyone out there that could shed some light on this matter.

    I recently purchased a totem (still in the boX), but afraid to use it quite yet.

    I have read a lot of posts pertaining to coil shocks and air fork, but not vice versa.
    If there is a forum that I have seem to have overlooked, please direct me!

    I have a new vivid air with new totem. PS(Too good of a deal to pass up on the totem, had to get it).

    Thanks
    I haven't run that combo before but, just be glad you have an oil/coil fork. I haven't had good luck with air forks. I wish Fox still made the Vanilla

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ihaveagibsonsg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    970
    Stick it on the bike and start smiling. I love coil forks but I'm a lightweight. I can get a better tune out of air sprung shocks and forks for my weight, so I ride air front and rear. Coil rides far better but the setback is weight. I've ridden an air shock with a coil fork, its no different than run air all around.

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.