Considering the Nomad - Any other alternatives for my riding style?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Considering the Nomad - Any other alternatives for my riding style?

    I've currently got a Blur LT2 and since getting into riding at a local bikepark, the frame has started feeling a little unsuitable for what I've been doing there - small drops, steep rockgardens and jumps, basically light DH stuff. Before this, I did mostly technical trailriding.

    Now I've been looking at the Nomad with a 170mm Lyrik-fork. I want a bike that would be good for both, technical trails and light DH. I do XC-style riding very rarely, but quite a lot of climbing in technical terrain. Would a Nomad be OK for climbing with a 170mm fork and a DHX rear shock? Optimally, I'd like the bike to be below 32lbs and still be able to take some beating in the downhill.

    Do I have any other viable options from SC besides the Nomad?

  2. #2
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    How about a 180mm Fox 36 Talas on a Nomad?

    You could lower it to 140mm and it should feel a lot like your LT2 - if you engage the propedal on the shock.

    Then put it to full travel and shred your local park.

    If you had 2 wheelsets - one light and one really durable - you´d probably end up with "almost" two bikes.

    Or you could keep your LT2 and get a real parkbike.
    Might be cheaper, because it could be heavier and therefore a lot less pricey.

    Greetings Znarf

  3. #3
    I fix choppers
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    Butcher

    I was in a similar place, grasshopper. I loved my old Heckler, but sought more. I dug my Nomad 1.0, but it was too much. The Butcher rides (pedals) like the Nomad and handles like the Heckler. The perfect bowl of porridge. Plus it's $500 less than a Nomad (AL). I have mine set up with a Lyrik SA and a Pushed Float R. It weighs in at 33 lbs and I cannot find anything I don't like about it except that it was not delivered by nude Asian chicks along with bags of money and cocaine.
    Last edited by HELLBELLY; 07-07-2011 at 12:06 PM.
    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
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    Thanks for that tip on the Talas, Znarf. That sounds like just what I need. I plan on keeping the Blur LT too probably, but gonna put her on a diet as soon as I get another bike. As for the wheels, I was thinking about Hope Pro2 Evo hubs on Spank Rubrosa rims. A little heavier than my current Mavic 819 discs on the Blur, but not that much. Another set of wheels wouldn't be a bad idea too, just need to rake in the extra cash for those somehow

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kreal View Post
    I've currently got a Blur LT2 and since getting into riding at a local bikepark, the frame has started feeling a little unsuitable for what I've been doing there - small drops, steep rockgardens and jumps, basically light DH stuff. Before this, I did mostly technical trailriding.

    Now I've been looking at the Nomad with a 170mm Lyrik-fork. I want a bike that would be good for both, technical trails and light DH. I do XC-style riding very rarely, but quite a lot of climbing in technical terrain. Would a Nomad be OK for climbing with a 170mm fork and a DHX rear shock? Optimally, I'd like the bike to be below 32lbs and still be able to take some beating in the downhill.

    Do I have any other viable options from SC besides the Nomad?
    I have a BLT2 and Nomad 1. I find these two bikes overlap a fair bit. I ride the Nomad on really rocky trails and it works really well for that. But, for most of my riding, I'll take the Blur.

    Luckily, the DH parks in Ontario aren't that great, so the Nomad with a 180mm fork can handle it all for now. But, in a few years, I may pick up a dedicated DH rig.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    . . . cannot find anything I don't like about it except that it was not delivered by nude Asian chicks along with bags of money and cocaine . . .
    Wow thats really weird . . . mine came like that.

  7. #7
    I fix choppers
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    Quote Originally Posted by OO7 View Post
    Wow thats really weird . . . mine came like that.
    Dammit!!! What a rip off!!! Oh well, I will just go for a ride to get over it.
    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    Dammit!!! What a rip off!!! Oh well, I will just go for a ride to get over it.
    Yeah, I wouldn't worry too much . . . we did all the blow and amidst my stupor, the chicks took the money, punched me in the balls and ran. I woke up in the bathtub with some duct tape on my back over what seems to be a pretty brutal "surgery" clutching several pieces of my new bike. Apparently I put up a fight.

    I had to put the bike back together, and can't find the rear wheel or the left pedal, but at least they left (most of) the bike . . . . so much for a happy ending.

  9. #9
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    I have a BLT1 and a Nomad 2. I actually went with a Nomad to use everywhere - including lift assisted downhill. Note the Nomad did fine - my Lyrik 2step fork blew out once a season for 2 seasons - while downhilling. For trail riding the Lyrik is fine. (I've been chastised by my LBS guy that the Lyrik works fine for downhilling - it's probably because I am not that good and not that smooth) Anyway I had a choice of getting a new fork, or a used downhill bike - I went with a used downhill bike for lift assisted riding. DH just beats on the bike too much - and I go almost every weekend. But if you are truly only using the Nomad for light DH - then it should be fine. Again, let me emphasize, I used the Nomad almost every weekend for 2 DH seasons in Colorado (almost every weekend) and the only problem I had was with the fork.

    Most rides in my area are a tech slog up, and tech down - I've been quite pleased with the Nomad as a pedal bike - but I have not tried any of the APP bikes. I agree with the other posts - if you have a lot of climbing get some kind of adjustable fork so you can drop the travel for the climb.

    I've started riding the BLT1 in the Parks as the smaller travel and lighter bike are easier to pop - but the Nomad does fine as well.

    TL ; DR - get a Nomad if you have the cash.

  10. #10
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    Ibis mojo HD ! Get it you won't be sad.
    Trek T1 . MOJO SL 2011 Fox 32 Talas 1X10 FTW

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ikilledkenny2 View Post
    Ibis mojo HD ! Get it you won't be sad.
    I rode a Mojo. I really liked the bike a lot, except it seemed too light to be used for a lot of my riding. It climbed like a banshee, but seemed very unstable in the downs. I guess if I had it for longer than a 3 hour demo, I might be able to get used to it bouncing all around underneath me.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by woahey View Post
    I rode a Mojo. I really liked the bike a lot, except it seemed too light to be used for a lot of my riding. It climbed like a banshee, but seemed very unstable in the downs. I guess if I had it for longer than a 3 hour demo, I might be able to get used to it bouncing all around underneath me.
    With a shorter stem and perhaps a 170mm or 180mm fork that bike can be set up for very aggressive riding. I don't know how the bike you were riding was set up but I assure you a bike like that can handle just as much as a nomad.
    Trek T1 . MOJO SL 2011 Fox 32 Talas 1X10 FTW

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ikilledkenny2 View Post
    With a shorter stem and perhaps a 170mm or 180mm fork that bike can be set up for very aggressive riding. I don't know how the bike you were riding was set up but I assure you a bike like that can handle just as much as a nomad.
    I wasn't saying that it couldn't. It's just that it didn't fit my riding style and my preferences...that's all.

    Edit: FWIW, I think it was a 160mm...
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

  14. #14
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    Been thinking about this for a while now. I'm probably gonna leave the Blur as my trailbike, and get a Transition TR250 for playing around in bikeparks. No point in having 2 bikes (Nomad and Blur) that overlap so much.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OO7 View Post
    Yeah, I wouldn't worry too much . . . we did all the blow and amidst my stupor, the chicks took the money, punched me in the balls and ran. I woke up in the bathtub with some duct tape on my back over what seems to be a pretty brutal "surgery" clutching several pieces of my new bike. Apparently I put up a fight.

    I had to put the bike back together, and can't find the rear wheel or the left pedal, but at least they left (most of) the bike . . . . so much for a happy ending.
    Is it just me or did we leave the most useful information for the original poster?

    Just remember empty beer frequenters the moral here is to do all of the blow, protect your organs (the ones you can and cannot see!) and most importantly ride a Butcher.
    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

  16. #16
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    People who usually approach the DH spectrum end up getting a DH bike. I'm not much of a DH guy but I gave in eventually. No bike will do it all, I'm finally convinced. You're gonna have fun looking around, that's for sure.

  17. #17
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    What do you guys think about a Knolly Vtach? My Nomad does OK at the local DH runs, think the Vtach can handle DH well enough? Would a V10 be better than a Vtach?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by macming View Post
    What do you guys think about a Knolly Vtach? My Nomad does OK at the local DH runs, think the Vtach can handle DH well enough? Would a V10 be better than a Vtach?
    DH questions, especially if they're non-SC bikes are better answered in the Freeride/DH forums. People here do have good feedback on VPs, Driver 8s and V10s. From what I've been told, the older V10s may be super-fast but since they have so much rear travel, it's more difficult to make the bike pop. The new carbon ones that adjust from 8.5-10 seem to be more responsive. Again, based on other people's feedback.

    Even DH riding has several different flavors... technical, rocky, fast, flowy, jump-laden... or a combination of all. You don't always need a DH bike to do well in a good portion of them. I read that in this year's Sea Otter, the best times were on trail bikes (maybe freerides). Go figure.
    Last edited by ron m.; 07-11-2011 at 02:35 PM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ron m. View Post
    DH questions, especially if they're non-SC bikes are better answered in the Freeride/DH forums. People here do have good feedback on VPs, Driver 8s and V10s. From what I've been told, the older V10s may be superfast but since they have so much rear travel, it's more difficult to make the bike pop. The new ones that adjust form 8.5-10 seem to be more responsive. Again, based on other people's feedback.

    Even DH riding has several different flavors... technical, rocky, fast, flowy, jump-laden... or a combination of all. You don't always need a DH bike to do well in a good portion of them. I read that in this year's Sea Otter, the best times were on trail bikes (maybe freerides). Go figure.
    Ahhh excellent. Those are some very good points. I think I came across a possibility to trade my Nomad frame for a Vtach with comparable and necessary parts (rear wheel, cranks, FD) straight up! I know the Vtach is more capable than the Nomad, and considering I have a nice Blur LT as well, the Vtach should have less overlap than the Nomad right now

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