Tubeless question

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  • 11-20-2012
    xxxxx
    Tubeless question
    Hi All,

    Riding along on a tubeless setup, a leak occurs during this long ride that the stans sealant can't seal. You decide it is time to put in the emergency tube. Will the residual sealant cause the tube to bunch up, fold on itself and not sit in the tire correctly?

    Will this cause the tube to fail prematurely? How much harder will it be to put the tube in if the tube won't slide around inside the tire?

    Thanks,
    Josh
  • 11-20-2012
    Motivated
    Good question. You can use fix-a-flat to seal or even repair the cut in the tire and re-air. So its not like flat tubeless = insert tube. I've been running tubeless off and on for ~7 years. I've never had to install an emergency tube, but I always carry one as I'm sure I could get it to work no matter how messy. I've only had flats with tubes installed (not counting a few flats close enough to home so I just walked back - due to broken glass cutting a hole in the tire which failed to seal). Once on the way to work I got a flat due a huge nail right through a knobby and touching the rim - left the nail in, I aired it up, sealed enough to make it to work, then aired up again before riding home.
  • 11-20-2012
    Crudcake
    I too, have been running tubeless for years and would never go back. I've had to pop a tube in one time on my gravel grinder, not due to a fat, but the tire started delaminating and the sealant produced a bubble in my tread the size of a golf ball. To answer your question, the tube was un affected by any remaining sealant. I took the valve stem out of the wheel and reused it after I replaced the tire.

    Remember, they make plug kits that can help you with larger punctures on tubeless. Mist bike shops have them.
  • 11-20-2012
    xxxxx
    Thanks for the info. Tubeless sounds great but for some reason losing the tube makes me worried.
  • 11-20-2012
    ATBScott
    After you shake the excess fluid out of the tire (more as a "try to not make such a mess of things" practice than any real functional process) putting a tube in will let you ride out just fine. I've had a couple of non-sealable flats over the last 7 years or so - one 'cause I hadn't refreshed my Stan's fluid in 8 months or so, and nothing was left to seal the puncture. Another was a sidewall cut that wouldn't be sealed by anything but a casing boot and I used a tube to ride out - another was a rock impact that bent the rim badly enough that the bead barely seated with the tube in it - after I "massaged" the rim with some tools to try to pry the bead edge back up to re-install the tire. That one was such a hard hit my neck hurt for a few days... Don't worry about tossing a tube in if you need to - most of us tubeless riders have done it at one time or another. I can't count how many times I have pulled a thorn, nail, etc... out of the tire only to have it seal up on me in a few seconds.
  • 11-21-2012
    xxxxx
    This is the exact info I was after. I'm going to build up a tubeless set and make the jump. Thanks guys. Have a fun Turkey Day!

    JOsh
  • 11-21-2012
    c0nsumer
    For what it's worth, since going tubeless back in May I've only had one failure, which tubeless couldn't have helped with. I got an unexpected flat while out riding, and unable to find the source or get it to re-seal I fitted a tube. It worked fine for about six miles, when the sidewall fully gave way and the tube exploded with what sounded like a gunshot.

    This wasn't the fault of tubeless sealant as I had the exact same failure mode happen to another tire purchased at the same time on a tube-only wheel, except I caught this one before it burst. (Photos: Failure 1 w/ Tubeless - Failure 2 w/ Tube Only)

    I blame the tires on these occasion. The tube worked fine as for fixing the tubeless issue until the sidewall fully gave way.