Deadwood travel increase- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Deadwood travel increase

    So after a little internal debating I decided to lengthen the travel of the fork on my Deadwood to 140mm from 120mm. I saw that Levity had done it and liked it, and I was due for a lower fork service anyway so I figured a $40 airspring would be cheap enough to play around with and see if it suited me and yet easy enough to swap back out if it didn't feel right. I had about an inch of spacers under my stem to play with to get the front end back in position with the longer travel. Well, I finally got it out to ride it yesterday and WOW!!!! It is completely a different bike. It is lively and responsive and yet it just eats up everything in front of it. I have a park near me that has a few miles of trails but most notably it has a loop that is about 1/2 mile long that has some climbing with some mild switchbacks, a little rough stuff thrown in, a flow line with berms and jumps, a little rock drop and a boulder that you ride over and down the back side of. This is a perfect place to dial suspension in so I went out there with a Shockwiz to do just that. I rode that loop probably 15 times, dialing in the suspension a little more with each time and by the end, the bike felt absolutely AMAZING! Catching air in the jumps, clearing tabletops, super stable at speed and yet flicked its way through the tight tree slalom at the end. I've only got a few hours on it so far, but I am REALLY digging it so far ... more so even than having a matched longer travel bike. Just the precision of the back end and efficiency when climbing that just feels so good and yet having the confidence that the front end can handle anything I throw at it is such a great combination.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Deadwood travel increase-img_0843.jpg  


  2. #2
    rth009
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    Cool. A sweet ride like that needs a dropper post.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    Cool. A sweet ride like that needs a dropper post.
    Everyone keeps saying that LOL ... Iíve tried 3 different ones in the past and never could get along with them. Iíve got one more on the way to give them one last chance so weíll see

  4. #4
    rth009
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    You will get you used to it. I demoed a bike with one 5 years ago, but didn't see the benefit because I kept forgetting it was there, but 3 years ago I got a new ride with one and will never have another-off road bike without one.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    You will get you used to it. I demoed a bike with one 5 years ago, but didn't see the benefit because I kept forgetting it was there, but 3 years ago I got a new ride with one and will never have another-off road bike without one.
    One of my worst crashes in recent times came when using a dropper. It was a high speed descent with fairly rhythmic "slaloming" ... front wheel washed in a sandy corner and I went flying .... almost broke my wrist and was out for about a month. As for using it in other situations, I typically don't stand when pedaling and the undulating terrain I typically ride makes the motion of activating the post, pushing it down while trying to pedal, taking advantage of it for 10 seconds, having a little 10 second roller that needs to be pedaled over awkwardly because i am almost assuredly not in the right gear, but if I put the post back up, then I need to pause my pedaling to put it back down and if it is a tricky somewhat technical transition at the top of the hill, I am constantly looking for a "safe" place in the descent to drop the post. I know there are TONS of people who ride the exact same trails and type of terrain as me who swear by droppers, but for me, the benefits rarely justified the frustration. By the end of every single "trial" I had with them, I was using it exclusively for getting on and off the bike. Don't get me wrong, I WANT to like it. After hearing so many people extolling the virtues of droppers, I feel like I am doing something wrong and missing out. I am going to give it one more try and see if I can make this work out for me

  6. #6
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    In rolling terrain just dropping the seat an inch when stuff gets twisty and fully extended when climbing is nice. You dont need to spend the money on a long travel dropper if that's all you do.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    In rolling terrain just dropping the seat an inch when stuff gets twisty and fully extended when climbing is nice. You dont need to spend the money on a long travel dropper if that's all you do.
    It's one reason I've always like 3 position droppers more than infinite.
    Ripley LS v3
    OG Ripley v2 handed down to son

  8. #8
    rth009
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    what droppers/levers have you used? I had a reverb with the plunger dropper and that was terrible. I later upgraded that to a 1x lever and it was an improvement. Now Im on a Bike Yoke Revive on my Horsethief and a PNW Cascade with their cheapest 1x lever on my fatbike. both are much easier to operate, especially the Bike Yoke. you get to the point where you dont even think about it. adjusting the post 1" up or down the same as dropping a couple gears.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    what droppers/levers have you used? I had a reverb with the plunger dropper and that was terrible. I later upgraded that to a 1x lever and it was an improvement. Now Im on a Bike Yoke Revive on my Horsethief and a PNW Cascade with their cheapest 1x lever on my fatbike. both are much easier to operate, especially the Bike Yoke. you get to the point where you dont even think about it. adjusting the post 1" up or down the same as dropping a couple gears.
    I started with a Reverb. I had a fair amount of hydraulic issues with it (mainly to do with cold weather operation), so I felt like that soured my opinion right off the start ... so I sold it and went back to a rigid post. Then I felt like I just didn't get a decent post with the Reverb so I went with a KS Lev Integra which functioned better overall, but developed a little bit of a suspension feel which really annoyed me. Tried rebuilding it but it just never felt right. I probably would have kept it just for the few times I ended up using it except that it didn't really perform well for the times when I wasn't using it ... so I sold it and went back to a rigid post. Then, my current bike came with a KS ETen Integra so I felt like I would give it another try. It felt sort of cheap in the lever and had a really slow rebound and just didn't really feel right. I tried upgrading the lever to a Raceface Turbine lever which helped the ergonomics but the super slow rebound just didn't work. I gave it to a friend and thought I would try another KS Lev Integra thinking that maybe I got a bad one earlier. This one actually worked fantastic. No play at all. Fully rigid when locked out and functioned flawlessly. But I still was struggling with my form and the actual usage of it. I tried and tried to use it as much as I could, but found that it was more frustrating than useful. I got to the point where I was using it in the parking lot only to get on and off the bike and when I went through a simplification kick, I got rid of it altogether. So now, as a last ditch effort, I bought a secondhand Thomson Elite Covert. Being used, I am prepared to deal with any functionality issues it may have, but I am really just wanting to focus on the form and usage than anything else. I REALLY hope this sticks and I can make it work out for me. There were points on yesterday's ride in the mountains where a dropper would have been REALLY helpful because I felt I couldn't get back and low enough on the big descents. We'll see how it all works out though. It is arriving today so I should have it installed by later tonight

  10. #10
    rth009
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperUltraKel View Post
    I started with a Reverb. I had a fair amount of hydraulic issues with it (mainly to do with cold weather operation), so I felt like that soured my opinion right off the start ... so I sold it and went back to a rigid post. Then I felt like I just didn't get a decent post with the Reverb so I went with a KS Lev Integra which functioned better overall, but developed a little bit of a suspension feel which really annoyed me. Tried rebuilding it but it just never felt right. I probably would have kept it just for the few times I ended up using it except that it didn't really perform well for the times when I wasn't using it ... so I sold it and went back to a rigid post. Then, my current bike came with a KS ETen Integra so I felt like I would give it another try. It felt sort of cheap in the lever and had a really slow rebound and just didn't really feel right. I tried upgrading the lever to a Raceface Turbine lever which helped the ergonomics but the super slow rebound just didn't work. I gave it to a friend and thought I would try another KS Lev Integra thinking that maybe I got a bad one earlier. This one actually worked fantastic. No play at all. Fully rigid when locked out and functioned flawlessly. But I still was struggling with my form and the actual usage of it. I tried and tried to use it as much as I could, but found that it was more frustrating than useful. I got to the point where I was using it in the parking lot only to get on and off the bike and when I went through a simplification kick, I got rid of it altogether. So now, as a last ditch effort, I bought a secondhand Thomson Elite Covert. Being used, I am prepared to deal with any functionality issues it may have, but I am really just wanting to focus on the form and usage than anything else. I REALLY hope this sticks and I can make it work out for me. There were points on yesterday's ride in the mountains where a dropper would have been REALLY helpful because I felt I couldn't get back and low enough on the big descents. We'll see how it all works out though. It is arriving today so I should have it installed by later tonight

    Wow. You certainly cant be faulted for lack of trying. Get the Thompson installed and adjusted and leave it on. I bet you will learn to love it.

  11. #11
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    As I suspected, the post that was supposed to be "in perfect working order" came and the very first thing I noticed was the suspension effect. I could feel it just holding it in my hand ... about a 1/2" or so just pushing it in my hands ... probably a lot more if it was installed with my body weight on it. No worries though. I figured it might take some work considering the price I paid. So I didn't even bother installing it yet. I set to work on stripping it down so I could service it. I know that supposedly Thomson posts are not serviceable but I found a very useful guide on here that kind of walks you through the procedure and I am pretty much through it all except the airing it it back up ... apparently it needs a special air adapter that I don't have. Quick visit to Amazon and it's due to arrive on Wednesday

  12. #12
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    So the dropper is installed now. Took a little bit to service the seatpost. I can see now why Thomson says that all service should be sent to them LOL .... but it's done and functioning flawlessly. Installed on the bike. Since it didn't come with a lever, I decided to go with a Cane Creek Dropt lever. Pretty adjustable and it matchmakered right up to my brake levers. I also played around with saddle position a bit. I moved it slightly forward from where it was ... I had it set back a good bit for better position on descents but was always riding the nose pretty hard on the climbs ... since I can now drop it out of the way for the descents, I brought it forward a bit for more comfort and efficiency while climbing. Now to wait for the rain to stop and the trails to dry out a bit before taking it out and playing
    Deadwood travel increase-img_4455.jpg

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