Syncros Crank Model?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Syncros Crank Model?

    I recently acquired this Syncros crank. I've scoured the online resources but don't see it listed anywhere. Anyone know what model it is? Thanks in advance!
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  2. #2
    All 26.5" all the time!
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    Near net forged.

  3. #3
    He be a moose too.
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    It's not on the bike pro site, but there is a mtbr review of them:

    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/oldercra...ct_20793.shtml

    I've seen them before. Not that common, but not that unusual. Syncros crank in general are relatively uncommon. Pretty pricey stuff.

    'Guin

  4. #4
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    Pretty interesting. I used to see their tubular welded chromoly cranks a lot around Vancouver in the mid '90s, but never saw those.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by robinmiller
    Pretty interesting. I used to see their tubular welded chromoly cranks a lot around Vancouver in the mid '90s, but never saw those.
    I saw more of these than the steel cranks. I do not remember the model name.

    Seems like not many of the steel cranks (Revolution?) reached the general distribution channels.
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  6. #6
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    I have a set on my dekerf. 8 years and counting, I have weighed as much as 210. They have been plenty stiff enough for me.

    A few cautions, they are really picky about torque when installing. It is better to not rely on a torque wrench and do it by feel so they are tight, but not too tight. After a year of riding them with torque by hand, a mechanic used a wrench on mine and nearly wallowed the arm. Fortunately, he stopped when he saw them "creep" past what is "normal" on a BB spindle.

    Also be careful with the Stress Transfer Device (plastic spacer/carrier), I have heard they break, mine is OK

    The best thing about them is how shiny and nicely polished they are when new.

    Here are mine after 8 years of use..
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  7. #7
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    The forged ones were alot cheaper than the steel ones, but still expensive compared to others in their day. They also came in black.
    IIRc, the steel cranks were for standard (26/36/46) size rings, and the forged ones were compact.

  8. #8
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    I've got a set of black ones

    Syncros Near Net Forged Alloy cranks, in compact drive. I got them when I cracked the bolt mounts on my Cooks Bros E-Cranks and these have been fine since. I've got them on my Strong Ti Hardtail and ruuning 20 and 30T Boone Ti rings and 42T Spec TA big ring and they're performing sweetly.

  9. #9
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    BCD's

    The revolutions were available in several bolt patterns, 94/58, 110,74 and 130 road pattern. I have an old set (vintage 96 or so) that are 94/58. You used to be able to get different 'power ring' attachments from syncros to change.

    AFAIK, the forged ones are compact BCD only, 94/58. I don't know what length BB they take, the revolutions take a little longer for geared drivetrains (118 reportedly), and I'm running a 127mm spindle in a SS setup with a freewheel hub to get the right chainline.

    Best thing about the forged sets are that there are no proprietary bolts to misplace, break or lose, unlike the revos.

    Plum

  10. #10

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    Great info!

    Wow! Thanks for the great information, guys! I added a new term to the vocabulary today: "near net forging".

    Plum wondered about BB length. The shop guy I got these from said they were taken off a 107mm spindle.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by donk
    I have a set on my dekerf. 8 years and counting, I have weighed as much as 210. They have been plenty stiff enough for me.

    A few cautions, they are really picky about torque when installing. It is better to not rely on a torque wrench and do it by feel so they are tight, but not too tight. After a year of riding them with torque by hand, a mechanic used a wrench on mine and nearly wallowed the arm. Fortunately, he stopped when he saw them "creep" past what is "normal" on a BB spindle.

    Also be careful with the Stress Transfer Device (plastic spacer/carrier), I have heard they break, mine is OK

    The best thing about them is how shiny and nicely polished they are when new.

    Here are mine after 8 years of use..
    Thanks for these words of warning. I'll be sure to keep them in mind when it comes time to assemble. So far I've only gotten to running my fingers all over the curves of this beautiful object, sicko that I am!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by xinapray
    Plum wondered about BB length. The shop guy I got these from said they were taken off a 107mm spindle.
    That sounds about right. I am pretty sure that is the size currently in my bike.

  13. #13
    hhh
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    problem with these

    The problem I had with my set of these is that the machining of the chainring seats (or the little black mounting thing referred to in the post above) seemed to be off, so when I tightened the chainring bolts the big ring would warp slightly. I ended up having to shim the big ring so that it would run straight.

    Also the stock rings weren't too great. They were very thin and this meant that the chain could slip down between the rings and get jammed. Also, the middle ring sat closer to the big ring that to the little.

    Mine came in an anniversary box set that was beaing sold very cheaply some years back. It included the cranks, ti bb, headset, front hub, ti seatpost, stem and bar.

    FYI, I still run them on a 107mm bb, but with race face rings. They work Ok.

  14. #14
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    I'm running a 108mm BB

    a Phil Wood Ti BB with alloy cups. Works very well.

    I previous ran a 107mm RF BB on my old Bontrager with this crank set.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by donk
    Also be careful with the Stress Transfer Device (plastic spacer/carrier), I have heard they break, mine is OK
    Donk, the stress transfer device on my crank appears to be metal -- steel or aluminium, I'm not sure. This is the part that bolts onto the back of the drive side arm, right? I'm guessing that it would have been too difficult/impossible to cold forge the whole arm with the intricate shape required by the two chainring bolts nearest to the arm, so they left this bridge to be bolted on onto the final shape. Neat.

    Xinaspray, IIRC, the arms were cold forged, then machined to final shape. The sides of the crank arms and the back side certainly bears machine tool markings. I've used mine since 1998 (the first review on mtbr was mine), and they've held up well. As for bottom brackets, I ran them with 107mm UN-90/71/72, Phil Wood 108mm and now a 107mm WTB Momentum. There's probably enough clearance on my frame to run a 103mm BB spindle.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plum
    You used to be able to get different 'power ring' attachments from syncros to change.

    Best thing about the forged sets are that there are no proprietary bolts to misplace, break or lose, unlike the revos.

    Plum
    I've heard there is a company in Switzerland that sells different power rings. I've sent them an email, but lost the address. Does this ring a bell with anyone?

    Also, if anyone out there needs the proprietary bolts, here is a fix:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=159591

    Pinguwin

  17. #17
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    I'm currently running a set of these in a 177mm on my Race Lite with Race Face rings and a Race Face adjustable chainline BB...They're awesome! I believe the BB is a 107mm...maybe 113...not sure.

    -Rb

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by joeadnan
    Donk, the stress transfer device on my crank appears to be metal -- steel or aluminium, I'm not sure. This is the part that bolts onto the back of the drive side arm, right? I'm guessing that it would have been too difficult/impossible to cold forge the whole arm with the intricate shape required by the two chainring bolts nearest to the arm, so they left this bridge to be bolted on onto the final shape. Neat.
    I think there may be a secondary reason for not trying to build in that part of the spider. If you're familiar with Campy Nuovo/Super Record style arms, they were well known for failing at the juncture where the spider looped in to meet the arm. This was due to the fact that the alloy at those junctures (one on each side of the arm) had nice sharp edges, leading creation of stress risers. In envisioning this crank with alloy in place of the stress tranfer device, I realized that those perfect little stress risers would exist here also, if Syncros had created a "complete" arm. Perhaps that's why the little gizmos are known as stress transfer devices?

    Quote Originally Posted by joeadnan
    Xinaspray, IIRC, the arms were cold forged, then machined to final shape. The sides of the crank arms and the back side certainly bears machine tool markings. I've used mine since 1998 (the first review on mtbr was mine), and they've held up well. As for bottom brackets, I ran them with 107mm UN-90/71/72, Phil Wood 108mm and now a 107mm WTB Momentum. There's probably enough clearance on my frame to run a 103mm BB spindle.
    Thanks for the scoop! I noticed the perfectly parallel machine tool markings as well.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GT_guy
    the steel cranks were for standard (26/36/46) size rings, and the forged ones were compact.
    There were some Revolution (steel) cranks that were compact design. Got a pair a few feet away.

    Penguin

  20. #20
    Carsten
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinguwin
    I've heard there is a company in Switzerland that sells different power rings. I've sent them an email, but lost the address. Does this ring a bell with anyone?

    Also, if anyone out there needs the proprietary bolts, here is a fix:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=159591

    Pinguwin
    www.velo-direct.ch i guess

    http://www.velo-direct.ch/01_shop/list.php?marke=29

    Carsten

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