88 Ritchey Ascent- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4

    88 Ritchey Ascent

    Hi there,

    I'm new to the board and would like some opinion on this bike.
    I stopped riding about 10 years ago after I moved to the suburbs, and I have this bike sitting in my in-law's basement collecting dust.

    I recently moved back into the city and thinking about biking to work.

    Should I sell this bike, and get a lighter hybrid bike that's more suited for city riding?
    How does this bike compare to what's out there now?
    If I do decide to sell it, what would be a fair value?
    What is so special about this bike that it's considered a collectable?


    It's near mint condition
    Purchase new in 1988
    19" frame (Red and Orange)
    Shimano Deore XT group

    Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    689
    Very classic bike. I would ride it. If there is a chance of theft, store it and get a more replaceable newer bike to commute on.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fillet-brazed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,696
    Quote Originally Posted by Free Willy
    Hi there,

    I'm new to the board and would like some opinion on this bike.
    I stopped riding about 10 years ago after I moved to the suburbs, and I have this bike sitting in my in-law's basement collecting dust.

    I recently moved back into the city and thinking about biking to work.

    Should I sell this bike, and get a lighter hybrid bike that's more suited for city riding?
    How does this bike compare to what's out there now?
    If I do decide to sell it, what would be a fair value?
    What is so special about this bike that it's considered a collectable?


    It's near mint condition
    Purchase new in 1988
    19" frame (Red and Orange)
    Shimano Deore XT group

    Any help would be appreciated.

    I wouldnt say the Ascent model is really a collectible bike. These were TIG'd in Asia whereas the "real" or collectible Ritcheys, atleast in my opinion, are the frames that Tom fillet brazed himself. You can check out oldmountainbikes.com for lots of info and old Ritchey catalogs.

    That said, it still does have some decent value, I would guess around $300-400 if its mint... It would make a fine city/commute bike. I use an old Ascent Comp for that very thing.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kb11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,213
    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    I wouldnt say the Ascent model is really a collectible bike. These were TIG'd in Asia whereas the "real" or collectible Ritcheys, atleast in my opinion, are the frames that Tom fillet brazed himself. You can check out oldmountainbikes.com for lots of info and old Ritchey catalogs.

    That said, it still does have some decent value, I would guess around $300-400 if its mint... It would make a fine city/commute bike. I use an old Ascent Comp for that very thing.

    Just to clarify, the Ascent is a "real Ritchey", the main triangle and chainstays were tig'd in Japan and then sent back to TR's shop where TR personally set the alinement, brazed the seat stay bridge, fillet brazed the seat stays to the seat tube and added all the braze ons, then the bike was finished at his shop. Certinally not as collectable as one of the fully fillet brazed models but this was still mostly made in the US. Some time in '88 all the tig'd bikes were made in TR's shop and TR personally did many of those. TR had a hand in every Ritchey that went through his small shop from Supercomps to Outbacks, Thats why his production was fairly low compaired to other small builders

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fillet-brazed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,696
    Quote Originally Posted by kb11
    Just to clarify, the Ascent is a "real Ritchey", the main triangle and chainstays were tig'd in Japan and then sent back to TR's shop where TR personally set the alinement, brazed the seat stay bridge, fillet brazed the seat stays to the seat tube and added all the braze ons, then the bike was finished at his shop. Certinally not as collectable as one of the fully fillet brazed models but this was still mostly made in the US. Some time in '88 all the tig'd bikes were made in TR's shop and TR personally did many of those. TR had a hand in every Ritchey that went through his small shop from Supercomps to Outbacks, Thats why his production was fairly low compaired to other small builders
    Yes, sorry KB, I guess one could say "still mostly made in the US".

    The seatstay to seat tube junction and the seatstay bridge are done by Tom. The rest was TIG'd by Toyo in Japan. But ya, its a Ritchey for sure, its just not one that Tom did from start to finish and its just not one you'd likely hang up on your living room wall.

    By the way, theres a cool Ritchey Ultra on ebay right now! Great seller too!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kb11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,213
    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    Yes, sorry KB, I guess one could say "still mostly made in the US".

    The seatstay to seat tube junction and the seatstay bridge are done by Tom. The rest was TIG'd by Toyo in Japan. But ya, its a Ritchey for sure, its just not one that Tom did from start to finish and its just not one you'd likely hang up on your living room wall.

    By the way, theres a cool Ritchey Ultra on ebay right now! Great seller too!



    how about pics of your living room wall?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kb11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,213
    At least TR worked on every bike going out the door. Thats more than you can say for some other builders. I doubt Chris Chance touched every Fat and I know that in '88 at least, Mountain Goats were made by the employees and not Jeff Lindsey, a close friend of mine worked there that year.

  8. #8

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1

    Keep it!

    I would definately keep it. However, based on the condition you describe I wouldn't use it for commuting for long.

    I have a '91 Ascent (maybe a "Comp" version...can't tell for sure) that I presently commute on (I just started riding again too after a few years away from the saddle). I commuted this bike before back in the mid-1990s when it was closer to new as well. The Ascent may not be a wall-hanger, but it is a very nice bike worthy of keeping in good shape. I am presently building up an old yardsale scored steel Stumpjumper to become my main commute steed so the Ritchey can be preserved.

    A couple of notes in this thread, it was my understanding that sometime in the late 1980s the Japanese tig'ed main triangles went away and all frame construction was in Ritchey's shop. Can anyone confirm this?

    Great bike that is worthy of preservation.

    Value is hard to say. I paid $500 for mine in 1994 in virtually new condition. The original owner was a SF Bay Area racer who had it custom assembled so the components don't exactly match what catalogs of the era indicate should be on the bike (things like Dura-Ace hubs, Avocet seat, etc.). What are they worth today???? Probably not much to the younger MTB set, but to us old nostalgic types perhaps there is still some value. I know I wouldn't sell mine cheap.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kb11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,213
    Quote Originally Posted by msvphoto
    I would definately keep it. However, based on the condition you describe I wouldn't use it for commuting for long.

    I have a '91 Ascent (maybe a "Comp" version...can't tell for sure) that I presently commute on (I just started riding again too after a few years away from the saddle). I commuted this bike before back in the mid-1990s when it was closer to new as well. The Ascent may not be a wall-hanger, but it is a very nice bike worthy of keeping in good shape. I am presently building up an old yardsale scored steel Stumpjumper to become my main commute steed so the Ritchey can be preserved.

    A couple of notes in this thread, it was my understanding that sometime in the late 1980s the Japanese tig'ed main triangles went away and all frame construction was in Ritchey's shop. Can anyone confirm this?

    Great bike that is worthy of preservation.

    Value is hard to say. I paid $500 for mine in 1994 in virtually new condition. The original owner was a SF Bay Area racer who had it custom assembled so the components don't exactly match what catalogs of the era indicate should be on the bike (things like Dura-Ace hubs, Avocet seat, etc.). What are they worth today???? Probably not much to the younger MTB set, but to us old nostalgic types perhaps there is still some value. I know I wouldn't sell mine cheap.

    Yes, In the late 80's early 90's the tig'd frames were made in TR's shop. In a conversation I had with him a few months ago he mentioned that he personally tig'd many of the frames during that period but couldnt remember models or serial #'s. Some time in the early 90's the tig'ing was done back in Japan at the Toyo factory where I believe its still being done today

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.