Your favorite trails: What do they have that the others don't have?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Your favorite trails: What do they have that the others don't have?

    I don't know quite where I'm going with this, but we'll see how it plays out. I've been reflecting on this for the last 12 hours because yesterday I finally went way out of my way to ride a trail that has been recommended and hyped to me for the last few years or so. To make a long story short, I was very disappointed in the trail, but glad that I finally crossed it off my list.

    To be clear -- my point of view is that every ride is a good ride, but not all trails are created equal. I'd suspect that everyone has a small personal list of trails that never fail to deliver; the ride is always ended with a huge smile, and they reminisce about that ride for days afterward. Whatever the factors are that make those trails great, if they're absent from a trail, the ride ends with more of a "that was swell" feeling.

    The trail I rode yesterday featured a 2300' climb in about 5 miles, followed by a fast descent back the way I came. There were lots of twisty turns, and notably very few sharp turns, so you could maintain a very high average speed on the whole descent. It was a ripping, high speed descent, in fact. By all accounts, I should have been hooting and hollering all the way down the trail -- and I can really see why some would have a ball with this trail. So what was missing?

    There were no bumps, no technical features, and nothing for my suspension to do. Given adequate brakes and tires, I think I could have descended this trail just as fast or faster on a fully rigid bike. The tread was just smooth as glass from top to bottom. And I need more than that to be stoked. The presence of high speed alone just doesn't do anything for me anymore.

    Thinking about my favorite trails, and what makes them my favorites, I've compiled a list of features that make them great for me:

    • Large, embedded rocks/boulders/roots. I need something for my suspension and body to do.

    • A variation in pitch from time to time; some very steep sections followed by more moderate angles

    • Line options, not just a narrow, single choice. Give me a puzzle to solve.

    • My tires must leave the ground every once in a while, and not just because I bunny hopped.

    • Undulating terrain; rollers, g-outs, and transitions -- so that a creative eye can see opportunities to jump, land in a pocket, and repeat. Forward momentum can be generated not just by pedaling, but by pumping the terrain.



    If a trail has all or most of the above, there's a great chance I'll love the trail. What factors do your favorite trails have? What puts an ear-to-ear smile on your face?
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  2. #2
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    Over time my needs have evolved from what a trail *has* to have: chunk, rocks, slabs, ledges, features, all making it very, very difficult to clean for any rider on any bike at any speed,

    Into what it mustn't have: Cheater lines, braids, crowds.

    I mostly crave having a non-crowded experience on a trail that the crowds haven't found and effed up yet.

  3. #3
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    CookieMonster, you described perfectly what kind of trails I love. I generally feel the same way too about the fast/smooth. I don't hate it, but it doesn't give the that big ol' poopy eatin' grin that I can't wipe off my face hours later.

  4. #4
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    It depends on several factors for me but especially how I feel on a given day. I typically run more than I bike because of limited time so my bike fitness is usually lacking.

    Most of my best local trails are still an hour away but only one is really challenging. It has one section that is a "flow" trail but still has enough tech to it that you have to pay attention and select lines. A mistake or too much speed could be disastrous.
    The rest of it, especially the very first section/loop is very technical and slow with various large rocks and roots to navigate, many including an incline. I rarely clear it without dabbing a foot somewhere. Gets my heart rate up quick too. I have to be clear in my mind that it's what I want to do that day when I go there.

    Really though, it's some of the best riding to me. It always makes me feel like I accomplished something.

    Sadly, this is the same trail that, no matter what I use, I pretty much always get chigger bites.

  5. #5
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    Ditto for me...I want challenge vs a smooth ride. Went and tried a new spot for the first time Friday at a place we had heard about. It's only about 5 miles but rumored to be very technical. Normal loops we ride are 8-15 miles / 2 hrs and we wondered if it was going to be too short. Very hot day...started at 1pm it was 90+ and very humid so we went into it with an 'exploration' mindset vs speed. Nobody at trail head (not surprised).

    Never got out of the lowest 4 gears of my GX12 cassette the whole ride. It was super tech, boney, tight singletrack with lots of short steep ups and downs...very challenging. Awesome workout and just kept coming at you...in many spots there were consequences if you fell. It was one of those places you would need to ride 4-5 times to learn the best lines and what's on the other side of some of the obstacles so we took our time. Fork and shock O-rings showed I used full travel on my Kona. Was only 1.5hrs but one of the best rides I've done in a long time...can't wait to go back.
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  6. #6
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    Rather than compile a giant list, I might be able to boil it down to a small list:

    - The trail needs some challenge (going fast, going slow, going down, going up... in all directions, if you know what I mean).
    - The trail can't be too dangerous.
    - The trail can't be too flat.
    - Minimize man-made stunts and groomed dirt features.
    - I like scenery.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  7. #7
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    I hear you on the crowd thing. We have experienced a population explosion where I live, and with that came not only more mountain bikers, but more people using trails for every other purpose as well. My town has an extremely outdoorsy/active culture, so much that we're all loving the trails to death.

    Some of my favorite all-time trails are unrideable anymore. Not because they're closed to bikes, but they are simply so over-crowded I can no longer enjoy the experience. Trails on which I used to be alone even on a weekend now feature full parking lots on a Tuesday at 6 am. My wife and I took our daughters for a hike a few months ago on such a trail, and ended up just driving past the trailhead because both parking lots were full and there were cars parked for half a mile leading up to them. We didn't want any part of that.

    New trails are being built for biking, but sadly they are more of the variety like I described in my original post -- smooth, polished, and lifeless. None of them hold a candle to the older trails that were built before mountain biking even existed, in my opinion.

    Regrading the cheater lines thing -- that is certainly rearing its ugly head. There is one on my "backyard" trail that our trail crews have finally just accepted. We've put logs and debris across its path probably 50 times -- but a few days later the debris is gone and there are fresh bike tracks cutting the bermed switchback. I don't know who takes it upon themselves to cut a switchback or why, but some people just feel entitled to re-route a trail, apparently.
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  8. #8
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    Certainly, I don't hate fast/smooth. It just doesn't make me want to come back again and again.
    Bikes belong in Wilderness areas.

  9. #9
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    I always feel unsatisfied after riding flat trails. Ok, for a casual ride sometimes but I need at least some short punchy hills for it to feel like I went mountain biking.

  10. #10
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    I agree- all those are qualities that make for a stellar riding experience.

    The one thing IMHO that detracts from any great trail is the Frikkin amateur brake bumps (divots) that most popular trails seem to wind up with


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  11. #11
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    Sounds awesome!
    Bikes belong in Wilderness areas.

  12. #12
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    I prefer alpine trails devoid of other people.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    I prefer alpine trails devoid of other people.
    This, with everything from fast flow to some chunky challenging sections. I have to have some fast downhill flow single track through the woods to complete me though.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  14. #14
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    My favorite trail system is my favorite due to location. I love the fact I can ride my bike out my front door and be on the trail in five minutes. It makes getting in rides so much easier than if I had to pack up the car and drive to a trail head. There is something satisfying for me to get home from work and not have to sit in more traffic.

    It also helps that said trail system has some small jumps, drops, tech and flow so I can hit whatever my mood fancies.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoingNowhere View Post
    My favorite trail system is my favorite due to location. I love the fact I can ride my bike out my front door and be on the trail in five minutes. It makes getting in rides so much easier than if I had to pack up the car and drive to a trail head. There is something satisfying for me to get home from work and not have to sit in more traffic.

    It also helps that said trail system has some small jumps, drops, tech and flow so I can hit whatever my mood fancies.
    That's fortunate, especially the not sitting in more traffic. To me that is the worst part of mountain biking and having trails so far from the house. Probably the main reason I also run.

  16. #16
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    As far as my favorite trails go, I enjoy good scenery. I know it's a favorite trail when I care more about getting to a certain lookout point to enjoy the view than I do about my Strava time.

    My favorite trails let me feel alone in the woods. I might see one or two groups of riders at most. If I stop for a break, I love only being able to hear the woods around me. No highways and cars. No other bikes. No bluetooth speakers. Just the wind blowing through the trees and the occasional squirrel crashing through the pine needles that sounds like a bull moose.

    Feature-wise, I like rocks and roots. Speed is fun and my challenge of picking my way through a section when there is no perfect line.

    But I agree with OP though, any time spent riding is a good time.

  17. #17
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    I ride a singlespeed, so I looove rolling trails, with stuff to pump and jump, technical stuff that makes me work to keep my momentum, but the thing I love the most is a tough climb. Thatís where my rush comes from...
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  18. #18
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    My favorite trail is the one I just got down without falling off for the first time.

  19. #19
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    My favorite trail is one I think a lot of others find a little boring.

    It's old school, it doesn't have a lot of elevation gain/loss (only about 100' per mile), there are no jumps or drops. There are really no steeps.

    While I love steeps, jumps, drops, etc. this trail just does it for me. It has soft loamy sections, it's really rooty, but not technically all that difficult, but by no means easy, there are a lot of rocks and twisties. Average speed is pretty low unless you are super fit and can pedal your ass off.

    But... it isn't ridden heavily, the location is kind of remote, and the forest is scenic. There are technically better trails nearby, with bigger descents and more "bike features" but for some reason I find this trail more fun. It might be because it's almost all natural and that it has some nice loamy sections.
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  20. #20
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    I prefer riding in the woods on trails neither created for or groomed for mtbing. I like trails that give the impression of riding to somewhere or over some distance rather than tightly weaving around to hit every possible "interesting" feature in 100 square meters. I like trails that are more or less deserted, largely devoid of hikers, mtbrs, equestrians, etc.. I like equal parts climbing and descending, with the climbing being more challenging.
    Do the math.

  21. #21
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    It's evolving as I become a better rider, but for now:
    *Scenery, including big views earned through a challenging climb.

    *Mostly devoid of other people.

    *Variety of ups and downs, roller-coaster style, although one big up and one big down is okay too, and is the norm around my neck of the woods.

    *Sections of tech to challenge myself, mixed with some fast and flowy.

    *Shade is nice in summer, or shelter from the wind in the spring.
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  22. #22
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    I prefer ups in single track that has a gradual non punishing incline that I can sustain that has curves that twist through areas.

    On the way down I prefer much the same with some fun smaller jumps and rolling features that I can pump through. I'd say that I'd rather have 5% down for 3 milers over 10% down for 1 mile. I want to enjoy my time and measure it with smiles.

  23. #23
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    Backcountry alpine rides with mind bending terrain, not particularly designed for bikes, committing mountain passes with no bail out options: Where poor decisions have consequences and adventure is at a premium.


  24. #24
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    I prefer rocky technical trails with drops, ledges, climbs, also big rocks, smaller rocks are fine with me and throw in some elevation changes. Add some some short flowing sections and I would be happy.

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 101 View Post
    Backcountry alpine rides with mind bending terrain, not particularly designed for bikes, committing mountain passes with no bail out options: Where poor decisions have consequences and adventure is at a premium.

    You definitely should take up mountain climbing as well. There are plenty of what's you are looking for.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    My favorite trail is one I think a lot of others find a little boring.

    It's old school, it doesn't have a lot of elevation gain/loss (only about 100' per mile), there are no jumps or drops. There are really no steeps.

    While I love steeps, jumps, drops, etc. this trail just does it for me. It has soft loamy sections, it's really rooty, but not technically all that difficult, but by no means easy, there are a lot of rocks and twisties. Average speed is pretty low unless you are super fit and can pedal your ass off.

    But... it isn't ridden heavily, the location is kind of remote, and the forest is scenic. There are technically better trails nearby, with bigger descents and more "bike features" but for some reason I find this trail more fun. It might be because it's almost all natural and that it has some nice loamy sections.
    ^^^Exact description of one of my favorite trails ever, except it has some steep ups/downs. It meanders along, then you might follow a ridgeline down into a ravine, or a rocky creek crossing, then it's a grunt up the other side - all while negotiating roots and logs. Some is fast, but mostly slow. Jumps and drops are usually off roots. Rinse. Repeat.

    -F
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  27. #27
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    My favorite trails? Anything not paved? MA rider here, North of Boston. So much, so good, really close. I can pedal all day in three directions, with some short paved connections. Not lacking for tech at all, here we have ridges and short punchy up, repeat as needed. Often times my favorite trail of the day is one I had a hand in building or fixing. Almost 20 years of that, great to see how the shape, flow and route has evolved. Bonus stuff, swimming hole or ice cream nearby post ride, several options for those.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoingNowhere View Post
    My favorite trail system is my favorite due to location. I love the fact I can ride my bike out my front door and be on the trail in five minutes. It makes getting in rides so much easier than if I had to pack up the car and drive to a trail head. There is something satisfying for me to get home from work and not have to sit in more traffic.

    It also helps that said trail system has some small jumps, drops, tech and flow so I can hit whatever my mood fancies.
    Yep. That plus feeling alone in the woods and 2-3 hour loops with 2000+ feet of elevation.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    ^^^Exact description of one of my favorite trails ever, except it has some steep ups/downs. It meanders along, then you might follow a ridgeline down into a ravine, or a rocky creek crossing, then it's a grunt up the other side - all while negotiating roots and logs. Some is fast, but mostly slow. Jumps and drops are usually off roots. Rinse. Repeat.

    -F
    Eastern OH and Western NY are pretty similar

    There are definitely steep ups and downs, but they are really short. One section has really tight switchbacks and not long traverses, so it's slow steeper terrain, and there is one small ravine crossing.

    There are jumps and drops, but like you say, they are off of roots and downed logs.

    The only man-made features are couple small bridges over wet spots, a few stacked logs to help over larger downed logs, and a little rock work to reinforce another wet area. Other than that, natural goodness.

    That's not to say we don't have some other trails around with bigger natural root drops, but they lack some of the other stuff this place has.
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  30. #30
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    Trails with elevation drop, steeps, features, etc. Tech that requires all around precision bike handling and brake control are what I like... the kind you wouldn't want to ride an XC bike on (queue "everyone's over-biked" nerds).

    https://scontent-lax3-1.cdninstagram...34545408_n.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Your favorite trails:  What do they have that the others don't have?-29737429_2037369586481366_1999328742534545408_n.jpg  


  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieMonster View Post

    • Large, embedded rocks/boulders/roots. I need something for my suspension and body to do.

    • A variation in pitch from time to time; some very steep sections followed by more moderate angles

    • Line options, not just a narrow, single choice. Give me a puzzle to solve.

    • My tires must leave the ground every once in a while, and not just because I bunny hopped.

    • Undulating terrain; rollers, g-outs, and transitions -- so that a creative eye can see opportunities to jump, land in a pocket, and repeat. Forward momentum can be generated not just by pedaling, but by pumping the terrain.

    These all hit a lot of what I like in a trail. Bonus if a trail can achieve all of those things "naturally" without having to manufacture the tech or flow.

    I'm civil/environmental engineer (profession) and trail builder (hobby/passion) who has been digging in the dirt since I was 8 years old, so soil type and tread surface is something I notice. I like trails with good traction and good dirt. I don't much care for dry dusty conditions, or kitty litter/marbles over hard pack. I like slippery muddy conditions provided the trails can handle it without damage.

    I like rough chunky trails, but prefer the chunk to be larger amplitude rather than small annoying chatter that just robs your speed. I'd much rather have to manual or lunge up onto/over/off of a series of ledges or embedded boulders than just be pounding along a section of annoying chatter that makes you feel like you are riding down a set of railroad tracks.

    I like trails that have just enough flow to reward a rider for carrying momentum into/over that larger/more challenging technical features.

    I prefer trails that have variable yet moderate speeds, spending most of my time bouncing between say 5 mph and 20 mph. I still like trails or sections that are slow rock crawlers that require trials skills, and I also like balls out high speed sections with big jumps, but my favorite trails are not 100% one or the other, nor are they generic flow trails designed to maintain a constant 15 mph or whatever top to bottom.

    I like steep sections (bonus for rock slabs/rock rolls), but not stupid steep continuous fall line trails that never allow you to let go of the brakes because you'll never get your speed back under control before the next turn.

    I like technical climbs provide there is good enough traction that one slip of the rear tire doesn't result in extended hike a bike.

    Off the top of my head, the only type of trails that I really hate are the continuous/pointless/no skill required speed robbing chatter type, and narrow overgrown trails that have lots of logs and rocks hiding in the vegetation waiting to clip your pedal on.
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  32. #32
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    Big mountains

  33. #33
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    My favorite trails are the ones that are rideable from my house.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatsDirt View Post
    Trails with elevation drop, steeps, features, etc. Tech that requires all around precision bike handling and brake control are what I like... the kind you wouldn't want to ride an XC bike on (queue "everyone's over-biked" nerds).

    https://scontent-lax3-1.cdninstagram...34545408_n.jpg
    Where the eff are you aiming?!

    Do I see 2 possible landings?
    And is there a bypass in the left background?

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  35. #35
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    Your favorite trails: What do they have that the others don't have?

    Proximity. I have little interest and even less time to load up the bike and haul it any significant distance. I like being able to ride the bike to the trails.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Your favorite trails: What do they have that the others don't have?

    Proximity. I have little interest and even less time to load up the bike and haul it any significant distance. I like being able to ride the bike to the trails.
    After having traveled thousands of miles to ride including Alaska, I came to your conclusion that traveling long distance to ride 100 miles has grown old and expensive. I drive about 10 minutes to reach a 34 mile trail that ends on a beautiful sandy beach on Lake Michigan (10 foot waves today). Mostly flat (a few longer climbs) with some 25 mph runs but I spend almost no time or gas to get there and I average 17 mph for 68 miles round trip. So I always get my workout and play at the beach in between. Not heart stopping stuff but with great tunes in one ear and faster sections keeps me going. I rode a new trail yesterday designed by some expert and #*$:%.?!~ crashed. So now I am a bit sore taking off today which most likely would not have happened on ďmy trailĒ. At 64, crashes may take longer to recover from. Safe Travels All.

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    ^^^ 17 MPH? Dirt road? Ok.

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    Not really, the Kal Haven trail. Some years ago you had to pay to ride it. No more. It is mostly crushed limestone. Longest climb is about 3.5 miles with 7% largest grade. Look it up. My Di2 XT double with synchro shift handles it all with just one shifter. On your left....safe Travels!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    Where the eff are you aiming?! Do I see 2 possible landings?And is there a bypass in the left background?-F
    There's a narrow dirt strip that kind of intersects the bottom left corner of pic... plants die off around this time of year so the landing will become wider then it is here. The climb to get here and challenging terrain kinda sorts out riders so that p-line you see to left is ok in my book.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    Where the eff are you aiming?!

    Do I see 2 possible landings?
    And is there a bypass in the left background?

    -F
    Who cares, as long as heís upright and typing the story out, itís all good. Of course he could be doing that from a hospital bed.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  41. #41
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    I share the preference for natural/tech/chunk (especially if I I can ride out my door to it). However, I am coming around to appreciating new school/flow trails, as I hate to miss out on enjoying both sides of things. While people here might not be pitting natural feeling vs constructed flow exactly, I have seen this debate play out in person and on the forums enough to find it interesting to think about. Here are the positives I see for less natural trails so far:

    * Berms can be fun. (I have more fun when I don't feel the berm was created by riders that kept pushing off a natural trail, and it was constructed on purpose on a trail designed for it, but that is probably less of a deal to some)

    * Fall line trails, while often steep and techy, pack less riding time into the real estate than a trail that twists down the mountain. Also, the purpose built trail can be planned to reduce erosion by water, and can be more sustainable, maintenance wise.

    * Swooping turns without major technical trail features allow riders of varying abilities to push as fast as they want to (or not) to see how much traction they can find in the turn, how far they can lean the bike, how well they can place their center of gravity through the turn, how fast they can come out of it.

    It's weird to me that there are all these blending sub categories of trail styles and rider preferences for dirt jumping, bmx, pump tracks and technical (natural or constructed) mountain bike trails now, but it adds some variety I suppose.

  42. #42
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    Well, I don't like trails where I feel like I'm going to die if I make a mistake! That automatically rules out trails with a sheer drop on either side of me.

    As for what I do like, descents with some technical stuff, a few moderate drops thrown in, some manmade features that aren't eight feet off the ground, some berms, armoured turns are fine, a few climbs (assuming I've done a big climb to get where I'm going) and no skinnies narrower than a foot! :-)

  43. #43
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    I've never found a trail I hate, but my favorite trails have these elements:

    Variety: ups, downs, fast, slow, smooth, techy, easy, hard.

    Beautiful scenery: This takes in a lot of varied scenery too. Mountains, desert, beach, lots of trees, no trees, dry, lush.

    Challenging/rewarding: I pride myself on being a decently competent rider and a trail that challenges my skills either on the climbs or the descents (or even in the flats) moves me.

    Bonus points for any trail with perfect/hero dirt.

    Examples of some of my favorites: High Roller (Cave Lake SP, Ely, NV); Gold Bar ST (Blue Dot); Portal; TWE, Moab; Cowboy trails, LV; South Mountain Phoenix; Lemon Drop, Tucson; Treasure Trail, Squamish BC; Micro Climate/Crazy Train, Whistler; Top of the World/Khyber Pass/Babylon/Business Time, Whistler; Wasatch Crest from PCMR to Canyons. You get the idea.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Dave View Post
    That's fortunate, especially the not sitting in more traffic. To me that is the worst part of mountain biking and having trails so far from the house. Probably the main reason I also run.
    Same here except that's why I started road-riding, in the couple of hours it takes me to load up and ride 15 miles of single-track and get back home I could do 40 on the road. It's boring but the fitness it brings makes mt biking more enjoyable to me.

    My favorite trail system has much lower traffic than the closer ones, I gladly drive further to avoid hikers that don't pay attention.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatsDirt View Post
    Trails with elevation drop, steeps, features, etc. Tech that requires all around precision bike handling and brake control are what I like... the kind you wouldn't want to ride an XC bike on (queue "everyone's over-biked" nerds).

    https://scontent-lax3-1.cdninstagram...34545408_n.jpg

    He is clearly over-biked.
    Bikes belong in Wilderness areas.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Dave View Post
    ...To me that is the worst part of mountain biking and having trails so far from the house. Probably the main reason I also run.
    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Same here except that's why I started road-riding, in the couple of hours it takes me to load up and ride 15 miles of single-track and get back home I could do 40 on the road...
    When I lived too far from the trails for easy access, I felt like taking up running or road biking were solutions that were far too extreme for me, so I just moved closer to the trails.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieMonster View Post
    He is clearly over-biked.
    An XC bike could jump up that.

  48. #48
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    While your thoughts on your trail preferences are fresh in your mind, you might want to fill out the national mountain biking survey: National Mountain Biking Survey Launches - Mountain Bike Review- Mtbr.com

  49. #49
    Keep on Rockin...
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    Cool thread OP

    The best trails...


    Can't be cleaned

    Raw, rugged, natural featured

    Are lonely, "out there", epic, remote.

    Have lots of techy climbs

    Have easy access to a swimming hole


    I guess my favorite bike trails are not bike trails at all, but have turned out to be remote hiking trails

  50. #50
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    Your favorite trails: What do they have that the others don't have?



    Beware the old man in a profession where men die young.

  51. #51
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    Favorite

    This was the most favorite ride I've ever done! Do yourself a favor and plan a trip to New Mexico!

    View in Chrome browser or YouTube for 360 VR video.


  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Over time my needs have evolved from what a trail *has* to have: chunk, rocks, slabs, ledges, features, all making it very, very difficult to clean for any rider on any bike at any speed,

    Into what it mustn't have: Cheater lines, braids, crowds.

    I mostly crave having a non-crowded experience on a trail that the crowds haven't found and effed up yet.
    This exactly.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Over time my needs have evolved from what a trail *has* to have: chunk, rocks, slabs, ledges, features, all making it very, very difficult to clean for any rider on any bike at any speed,

    Into what it mustn't have: Cheater lines, braids, crowds.

    I mostly crave having a non-crowded experience on a trail that the crowds haven't found and effed up yet.
    I also agree with this pretty much...a little snow would also be added to my fav trail...or a lot

    to me, crowds are the thing I hate the most...not lots of people riding, but lots of people NOT riding...
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

    15 Surly Krampus
    LET IT SNOW!

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