Your dream bike. How do you dream you'd get it?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Your dream bike. How do you dream you'd get it?

    I'd wager a good percentage of the people on this forum have a pretty sweet bike that they love to ride. But I'd guess a smaller percentage have the absolute ultimate ride they'd have if money were no object—I know I'd have a different one. I fantasize about my ultimate bike, but because I can only daydream about a bike for so long, I find my mind wanders even further to HOW I'd get the bike. Lottery. Etc. Anyone else have that train of thought?

    Here's my latest Mt Shredward piece on the subject. By the way, thanks so much everyone for all the clicks and nice emails I've been getting to the blog! It's been a blast and incredibly inspiring.

    Ride Mt. Shredward! - How to get your dream bike

    Andy

  2. #2
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    Nice.

    I always hope I get lucky during tax season and the government decides I need an extra couple bucks to spend on a bike

    Still waiting on that to happen...
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  3. #3
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    I'll make do with what I have right now, which actually fits me perfect and rides awesome. But theres a couple of bikes I have my eye on if I get a windfall. Specifically a Ibis Mojo.
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  4. #4
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    I don't really fantasize about dream bikes. I tend to "adjust" my dreams downwards to what I can afford. This is a tough year, so my "dream" bike this year is an El Mariachi frame that I bought lightly used at end of last season. I have the color-matched fork, which is very cool and lends a distinctive touch. I will build the bike rigid using mostly parts I already have that I strip from some other frame.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyb_aka_shredward View Post
    I'd wager a good percentage of the people on this forum have a pretty sweet bike that they love to ride. But I'd guess a smaller percentage have the absolute ultimate ride they'd have if money were no object—I know I'd have a different one. I fantasize about my ultimate bike, but because I can only daydream about a bike for so long, I find my mind wanders even further to HOW I'd get the bike. Lottery. Etc. Anyone else have that train of thought?

    Here's my latest Mt Shredward piece on the subject. By the way, thanks so much everyone for all the clicks and nice emails I've been getting to the blog! It's been a blast and incredibly inspiring.

    Ride Mt. Shredward! - How to get your dream bike

    Andy
    I have to say that I've dreamed about bikes ALL my life, and dreaming about my 'Ultimate Bike' has taken up an inordinate amount of my waking moments...

    The conclusion that I came to (fairly recently) is that the bike industry is full of Marketing people, but VERY few engineers... most of the 'fancy' stuff out there is really just flash, designed to separate you from your Benjamins. The other reality is that ANYTHING that you really want, anything that you've dreamed of, will be on sale at some point, and paying anything CLOSE to retail prices for components is silly (Frames MIGHT be the exception).

    For the past 4 years or so, I have dreamed of Turner 5.Spot, and lo-and-behold there was a huge sale last season on these frames and I bought mine for 35% off! Same has been true for ALL my major components (wheels/fork/etc.)

    In the end, the best way to get your DREAM bike is to save diligently, shop carefully, and take your time. My rig is finally built (not EVERY part is drool worthy, only the important ones) and its everything I always wanted it to be.

    And in my experience, ANY part that Shimano makes is very good, and anyone that makes a competative product should be evaluated carefully. It's rare that I've found a non-shimano part that is truly inferior to anything. My ride is almost all SLX/XT/XTR and each part works each and every time. I don't think ANYONE makes better components than Shimano XTR... they are LIGHT and work.

  6. #6
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    to get back to your original question..how. I won't buzzkill and talk of reality and responsibilities.

    i am sitting in a cozy chair on the porch of a nice alpine cottage while drinking a fine brew and eating a really good burrito while receiving a pre-ride massage as I lookout over the beautiful day of riding ahead. Then a heli lands nearby and brings me my bike of the day.

    the rest is kinda muddy as far as what bike(s) in particular but the "how" is dialled.

  7. #7
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    Im lined up to get my dream bike. Remedy 9. Im in the fortunate position of having most of my college paid for while having a fairly good income. I am livin the dream

  8. #8
    Surfin' da mountain
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    Stepping away from reality for a moment.

    It would be a 6.5" travel Turner All Mountain RFX with an internally geared (and perfected) rear hub and a Hammerschmidt like crank set up front. The chain device, just below & aft the front cog would be spring loaded to absorb chain stretch as the suspension strokes through its travel (i.e. elimination of derailers). The only other changes to whats pictured would be Hope V2 Brakes, XTR pedals, Azonic scandium bar, and the new Kronolog seatpost.

    Could you imagine how quiet it would be?

    And with the purchase of the bike, airline travel and accommodations covered to a Les Arcs bike vacation (once titled "Tour De Passport") as it is a fully lift supported 100KM loop through the ALPs on the French, Italian border. Uh! AND mother nature blesses us with sunny weather and agreeable temps for the week.

    How to get it? Win the Powerball, buy an established bike company and established small component company and hope to break even.

    If yer gonna dream big, make it a MONSTER!
    check out my user gallery to see how close I am to my dream bike now. Not bad...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Your dream bike. How do you dream you'd get it?-011rfx_proto_raw_bg.jpg  

    Last edited by Cucucachu; 03-12-2012 at 09:37 AM.

  9. #9
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    sold a couple race bikes.

    put a deposit down with a local custom builder (Rick Hunter).

    while waiting for my frame/fork i saved enough for the rest.

    ta-da...dream bike.


    currently being re-powdercoated..Rick was not happy with the finish and offered a new one done...i told him to pick the color scheme...

    curious to see what he comes up with..it's just gotta go with bright ass purple wheels.
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  10. #10
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    I'm fortunate in that I'm a VRC (vintage, retro, classic) guy, I already have my dream bike, three of them in fact (see my signature below). All I basically have to do is just wait for what I want/need to show up on ebay (it always does eventually) and get it.

    Only thing that might ever change is ditching the Richter for a Zaskar.
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  11. #11
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    I'm riding my dream bike every day. A 50th birthday present to myself.

    Custom built Black Cat
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  12. #12
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    Not a big "dream bike" guy at all. My thing is riding a frame for a season or two, and buying something completely different. Id like a real slack hard sprung 120mm bike next.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cucucachu View Post
    Stepping away from reality for a moment.

    It would be a 6.5" travel Turner All Mountain RFX with an internally geared (and perfected) rear hub and a Hammerschmidt like crank set up front. The chain device, just below & aft the front cog would be spring loaded to absorb chain stretch as the suspension strokes through its travel (i.e. elimination of derailers). The only other changes to whats pictured would be Hope V2 Brakes, XTR pedals, Azonic scandium bar, and the new Kronolog seatpost.

    Could you imagine how quiet it would be?
    Hammerschmidts are anything BUT quiet....


    I have close to my dream bike already.

    Frame: Already have a Santa Cruz Blur LTc (I would change my color to the white and black frame, or maybe a matte black)

    Fork: I have a Pushed Revelation 140 Dual Air. I prefer Fox forks, so I'd go with a Float 150

    Brakes: I haev SRAM XX brakes and I dont really care for them. Id switch them out for Formula The One brakes.

    Drivetrain: I have SRAM X0 RD and XT front derailleur with X0 shifters. Id probably switch to something 2X10 and durable. dont really caer that much

    Wheelset: I have Chris King hubs laced to DT Swiss XR400 rims. The rims are a bit lightweight. Id maybe switch the rims to something a little heavier duty.

    Rear shock: I have a RP23 and it works fine. dunno if a CCDB Air would work well on an LT, but it sounds like it could improve the ride. So Ill go with that

    Cranks: Dont care really. I have Truvativ Noir and theyre fine but kinda look beatup

    Seatpost: I have a Joplin and I would go with something else that is reliable. Not a big Joplin fan

  14. #14
    Monkey Junkie
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    Not a dream bike guy here either. Only interest in custom would be for the geometry, but doubt I could ever justify the price. I basically look at bikes as a tool to have fun with that you ride until it wears out or at least until another one comes along. I dream more about the places I want to ride them. Currently lusting after the thoughts of building another CX rig and getting some goodies for my hardtail. I also like the essence of simplicity that bikes offer, so super high-tech rigs don't interest me much. I look through magazines and see the $10,000, space age "dream bikes" and get a little disgusted to be honest. Not hating on technology, but like to keep it modest.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleAddict View Post
    I look through magazines and see the $10,000, space age "dream bikes" and get a little disgusted to be honest. Not hating on technology, but like to keep it modest.
    I hear ya. I wouldn't spend five figures on a bike no matter how much money I had. Nor do I really feel the need for a custom rig. I've never got on my bike and said, "Damn, if only I was 6 centimeters closer to the stem!" As far as geometry and performance goes, I feel like I've got close to my dream bike. However, if price was no object I'd fill the room for improvement I have in the weight department, especially since I love climbing. Upgrade from current Blur LT2 to LTc. XT to XTR and see what's doing as far as a lighter wheel set goes (I'm not really that knowledgeable as far as high end wheels goes).

    Andy
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  16. #16
    Weekend warrior aspirant
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    I have mine already - saved for a long while, then finally got it. I did charge a few of the accessories, but paid those off pretty quick.



    Already have thousands of miles on it - and it was worth every bit of scrimping

    /edit To be topical, I *am* building up a mtn bike, but I don't really have a "dream" mtn bike. Anything that gets me out and back will do

  17. #17
    Beer Me!
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    Mine gets shipped out next week!

    Here is what i did:
    Sold a couple bikes, saved up theoretical birthday and Christmas gifts from the wife for a couple years, asked for cash gifts from everyone else for a couple years, sold some of my art pieces. Bammo, Custom Ti Bike from FORM Cycles. Made a few sacrifices on components, but going to get EXACTLY what i want on the frame!

  18. #18
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    I think MTBiking is too diverse a pursuit to have one bike. Some days/rides you want to hot dog around, sometimes you wanna roll on big wheels. Et cetera. Even a pretty okay bike feels like a revelation in fun when you haven't been on it in awhile.

    I honestly could have any one bike I want, but that sounds boring and limiting to me. I'd rather get some strange now and again

    Mike

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    I think MTBiking is too diverse a pursuit to have one bike. Some days/rides you want to hot dog around, sometimes you wanna roll on big wheels. Et cetera. Even a pretty okay bike feels like a revelation in fun when you haven't been on it in awhile.

    I honestly could have any one bike I want, but that sounds boring and limiting to me. I'd rather get some strange now and again

    Mike
    That's an awesome point that I didn't even think of. The real dream would be to be able to have the means to have bikes—plural—that are a perfect match for all kinds of riding. I live really close to Pacifica in Nor Cal, which has some absolutely amazing downhill trail that frankly I'm afraid of. The main reason being that it's some crazy gnarly stuff that I don't have the skill to ride with my Blur. But if I had a freeride beast...I'd totally tackle those biatches! Then I'd have a 29er carbon hardtail to hit the Marin headlands and a cross bike...etc.

    Nice post

    Andy
    mtshredward.com

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyb_aka_shredward View Post
    The real dream would be to be able to have the means to have bikes—plural—that are a perfect match for all kinds of riding. I live really close to Pacifica in Nor Cal, which has some absolutely amazing downhill trail that frankly I'm afraid of. The main reason being that it's some crazy gnarly stuff that I don't have the skill to ride with my Blur. But if I had a freeride beast...I'd totally tackle those biatches! Then I'd have a 29er carbon hardtail to hit the Marin headlands and a cross bike...etc.
    mtshredward.com
    Roger, Roger! A dream quiver sounds more like it

    Hey, always good to have intimidating riding nearby you haven't done yet. There'll always be something. Wouldn't want things getting to bland, eh? Ride on, Andy...

    m

  21. #21
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    -Finish my Master's. (Engineering, incidentally. And post #5, very much agree with you.)
    -As long as I don't screw something up or ratchet up my lifestyle way too much all at once, I should be able to buy any production bike and any halfway reasonable custom bike as long as I'm not doing stupid stuff like this.



    -If I keep racing, that makes it easier.
    -I haven't ridden a FS I've liked, so that makes it easier too.

    EDIT: Speaking of quivers. I'd also like to either add, replace or revise a bike every year. I love my road bike but it's twelve years and has never quite fit me. I've had it too long and I'm too sentimental to finance its replacement by selling it. But retiring it to my wall and getting a new one with a shorter top tube would be cool. Would like to replace the MTB with a 29er that comes out of the box as a race bike. Etc.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
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    My dream bike doesn't even exist. I hope it will soon. A full carbon Devinci Wilson with Enve DH rims and a Dorado fork. It'd probably be over a $10k bike. Even if it existed, I don't think I would ever buy it. I'd never pay that much for a bike.
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  23. #23
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    As I get older, I notice that I get more pleasure out of the journey rather than the destination. So getting a ss titanium bike today would be cool, but only for a brief moment. But, having a plan for 6 months to a year or longer would fill every day with anticipation and every night of dreams of what I could have. I really enjoy the experience in wanting something, doing the research to make sure I get what I want, and putting in the work to see it take shape. The birthing process makes it that much more precious when I ride it. I have several bikes; road and mountain. Some bought complete, others built from frame up, often having to climb a steep learning curve. Every moment pure heaven as I look back despite many frustrating moments. I worked very hard all my life to afford to buy any bike I could want. To get a dream bike today would be the worse thing that could happen to me. Plus, the bikes I already have far exceed my abilities. Getting better a bike today would be just a waste and would deprive me from the many joys ahead. I started with a 26" HT that was too big for me, then bought a full carbon 29" HT. I enjoy riding it, but never really connected with it. I recently built a 26" FS that I absolutely love. I'll probably build a 29" FS around an Ibis or a Turner frame in the next couple of years. Then set my sight on that SS Titanium bike. Not any time soon.

  24. #24
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    whatever the dream, just go work your ass off to fulfill it.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooner518 View Post
    Hammerschmidts are anything BUT quiet....
    Ain't that the truth? At least when they're in overdrive. Sound like a deep-sea Penn reel with a 150 pound marlin running away from the boat.

    Mine is silent in the granny mode, though.
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  26. #26
    Surfin' da mountain
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cucucachu View Post
    Stepping away from reality for a moment.

    It would be a 6.5" travel Turner All Mountain RFX with an internally geared (and perfected) rear hub and a Hammerschmidt like crank set up front. The chain device, just below & aft the front cog would be spring loaded to absorb chain stretch as the suspension strokes through its travel (i.e. elimination of derailers). The only other changes to whats pictured would be Hope V2 Brakes, XTR pedals, Azonic scandium bar, and the new Kronolog seatpost.

    Could you imagine how quiet it would be?
    Quote Originally Posted by sooner518 View Post
    Hammerschmidts are anything BUT quiet....

    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Ain't that the truth? At least when they're in overdrive. Sound like a deep-sea Penn reel with a 150 pound marlin running away from the boat.

    Mine is silent in the granny mode, though.


    For those without the ability to comprehend what was implied or have the need to find fault in any statement, I love you man, but you're impossible.

    My dream bike would have a drive train with a single cog up front and a single cog in the rear but internal gearing to the best technologies available today and beyond like "anytime shifting (whether you are pedaling or not)", 2x10 speeds and reduced weight compared to derailers, cassettes and cogs.

    What made me think of this is, a friend rides a Spot Brand Longboard belt drive with a Shimano Alfine 11 Speed rear hub. Its as quiet as any SS yet can be shifted. Its his second Alfine - they're not real durable.

    I was thinking along the lines of a very durable Shimano Alfine "like" hub with reduced weight and a Hammerschmidt "like" crankset without the noise or feeling of drag applied to a very good long travel suspension bike. I really believe the days of 2 or 3 cogs up front and up to 10 in the rear are numbered.

    In reality what can I do to get it? Wait for SRAM and Shimano to perfect these ideas.

    'Til then I'll ride bikes of today's incredible engineering and advancement.

  27. #27
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    I learned something interesting in my machine design class the other day.

    There are two kinds of gears that are really common for gear trains. Spur gears, which are the ones everybody thinks of, with gear teeth that are at 90 degrees to the face of the gear, and helical gears, which have an angle.

    Helical gears are a lot quieter, but they're also a lot less efficient.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I learned something interesting in my machine design class the other day.

    There are two kinds of gears that are really common for gear trains. Spur gears, which are the ones everybody thinks of, with gear teeth that are at 90 degrees to the face of the gear, and helical gears, which have an angle.

    Helical gears are a lot quieter, but they're also a lot less efficient.
    Yep, I know that from dealing with performance cars. Factory car transmissions have helical cut gears, often coated with a nylon for quite smooth operation. This also increases wear and the ability to hold torque/power. Racecar built transmissions tend to have straight cut steel or billet gears. They tend to make alot of whining noises and shifts are kind of notchy but they dont wear as fast and hold alot more power.
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  29. #29
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    I am getting my dream bike, one part at a time.
    I have had my current bike for seven years, and when new, I did some component upgrades (including XTR cranks and carbon fiber bits) and shed nearly 4 pounds. Now in the recent years, I have upgraded the brakes and shifters to XTRs, and fork to Floats. The only remaining "big" change would be a new frame and rear shock. I would say that in the time to come, I will have attained my dream bike, parts and piece just how i like it. It would not be the ultimate weight weenie bike and that would not be my objective, because through my experience giving up weight sometimes gives up durability, e.g. race wheels vs training wheel set.

    For me, I am finding satisfaction in the "journey" and one day "the destination".
    Last edited by 40ncounting; 04-06-2012 at 06:48 AM.

  30. #30
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    I guess I would like to have a new Niner Air9 RDO, and I could go buy it if I were really serious about it. It probably wouldn't get ridden any more than my Rip9, and I could use that money for another vacation or house renovations (ugh)....

    Bottom line: for me it's a balancing act of fun stuff and what is better for me in the long run. Oh, and space in the garage!

  31. #31
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    I'd rub out my wife, make it look like an accident, and take the insurance money...
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glide the Clyde View Post
    I'd rub out my wife, make it look like an accident, and take the insurance money...
    haha ha...i like how this was the last post for 2 years

  33. #33
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    Custom Walt Works Singlespeed. No weight weenie parts, or at least nothing I'd have to worry about out in the boonies. Just bad ass, dialed for me, ready to go where I point it. Can I get some 18 year old legs and lungs thrown in for the custom build? Think it's about time to change out the 50 year old ones.
    I'm having more FUN than anybody!

  34. #34
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    Aloha, you ask a very good question. Here's my take and perspective.

    I guess this comes down to accomplishing goals in general. First part of it is it is all a matter of priorities. Mountain biking is a passion of mine. Therefore, it is HIGH on the list of priorities and wanting to put resources in that direction. There are others like family, food, daily securities, yada, yada..........

    With that said, I tend to "budget" and appropriate funds in that direction. I am always saving $$ because you never know when a rainy day will occur. But in the end, I know it's not going to be a quick thing. Therefore, I don't count on lottery etc. I work hard for my $$ and realize that far and few between people hit it big. Therefore, like mountain biking and climbing, we must pay our dues and be patient. In the end, with that plan and the image I have in my head, I actually build up a bike on a spreadsheet based on what I want from a bike with cost vs. performance.

    Eventually, the right deal comes up and the budget is there......I buy and build the bike I want. Often it's not exactly what I want because certain parts are just too expensive for what they return or the part I want just isn't available (yet). That means building the bike and then riding it and then fabricating/engineering what I want. So building up a dream bike often takes a few steps but the initial plunge of $$ occurs with that plan. Patience, planning, budgeting.

    Good luck with that.........

  35. #35
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    I think your time is better spent setting up the bike to perform optimally, be dialed in, etc.

  36. #36
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    I like my current 5010. A lot, I can't think of a better bike for me. My buddy got the fully pimped version with the 1x11, enve wheels, etc... so I guess that. Not really jealous about it though, there is always going to be something 'better', I just buy the best I can afford and enjoy it.

  37. #37
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    My dream bike is the one I am on while shredding up/down the trails.

    As of right now that is a Trigger and Scalpel.
    To have lived without passion, adventure, and thrill, is to never lived at all!!! YOU CAN'T FIX STUPID!

  38. #38
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    I'm on my dream bike ^^

    But dreams change...

    In a few years I'll be chasing a new dream :mwahahaha:
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  39. #39
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    I'm hoping for the orange Fatboy one day.

  40. #40
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    This is my bike. There are many like it, but this one is mine.

    My bike is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life.

    My bike, without me, is useless. Without my bike, I am useless. I must ride my bike true. I must ride faster than my friends who are trying to beat me. I must pass them before they pass me. I WILL…

    My bike and myself know that what counts on this ride is not the rock gardens we ride, the noise of our hoots, nor the dust we make. We know that it is the flow that counts. WE WILL FLOW…

    My bike is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weaknesses, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its gears and its tires. I will ever guard it against the ravages of weather and damage as I will ever guard my legs, my arms, my eyes and my heart against damage. I will keep my bike clean and ready. We will become part of each other. WE WILL…

    Before God, I swear this creed. My bike and myself are the defenders of my single tracks. We are the masters of our trais. WE ARE THE SAVIORS OF FUN THROUGHOUT LIFE.

    So be it, until victory is mine and there is no competition, only peace!


    I know I KNOW I'm a Dork :P
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  41. #41
    Reluctant Tree Hugger
    Reputation: Saladin's Avatar
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    I've been saving all year. $1 the first week, $2 the second, $3 the 3rd and so on. I have about $2,000 so far. If I keep that going til Spring, add my Christmas bonus and my tax return, and perhaps dip a bit into the checking account and/or a little bit of financing, I should be able to have a pretty sweet rig to start the new season.
    Live like there's no tomorrow. But pay your bills just in case there is.

  42. #42
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation: Osco's Avatar
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    I'm saving up for a faster rear tire...
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  43. #43
    mtbr member
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    I don't have a dream bike, i'm not experienced enough to know what that would be, but I still fantasize about a new ride regularly. There are quite a few on my list, and I hope to spend next season frequenting demo days and learning about FS bikes so I can invest in my first one. I'm budgeting around 3k for it (haven't saved a penny yet though...), but there are some components that seem very alluring and drive that price up quite a bit.

    How to pay for it? Hmmm. I like the idea of earning the money myself. if some really great paying work came along that would be perfect. If it fell in my lap, that just wouldn't be the same. I just made a large investment in my work and will be paying it off for a year or two, so the only way I will likely be able to buy a bike next fall will be to sell some of my music gear, which I have a lot of, as well as sequestering some money away. That will be a very hard choice to make but i'd say it is very likely I will go that way. I love my gear and instruments but some of it doesn't get used as much as it should. It's all about a balance of passions for me.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
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    Easy...


  45. #45
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
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    Work hard, save hard, and then buy what you want when you can afford it

    Oh, & no kids helps that plan go much quicker. (although after paying for dog boarding for a week over the holidays, I wonder sometimes....)

  46. #46
    mtbr member
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    I don't know if its because I'm new to mtbing and just don't know enough about the bikes... but when I dream about a bike... and I do daydream about bikes... I don't really get a focus on any one bike. mtb bikes are quite complicated, too many bikes for too many riding styles and situations. I'd have to have some serious cash to drop 5k or more on a dream bike anyway.

  47. #47
    mtbr dismember
    Reputation: Wherewolf's Avatar
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    Education, sacrifice, hard work, and patience

    Education, sacrifice, hard work, and patience.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
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    The $64 question!

    Dreams and perspective change with age. I've spent a lot of time riding for the past 20+ years and I dream more about places to ride than what bike I might be on. I do enjoy reading about all the new inovations and fancy new bikes and I ride some very nice demo bikes when I get the chance. I'm currently still enjoying my 2011 Remedy 9 and it compares nicely to the carbon fibre Devinci Troy I rode last month. I like to get a new bike when I feel the old one is holding me back. Usually 5 to 7 year intervals so the new bike just blows the old one out of the water. How to get it? Pay your bills, save money and don't live beyond your means. Mr Money Mustache is a good resource if you are looking for financial success.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MPX309's Avatar
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    Probably a Trek Session 9.9

  50. #50
    mtbr member
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    I had a strong feeling this spring(I've learned to listen to strong feelings)that I should start looking at new bikes. On my budget, this was illogical. One day I went to work, someone said to me"Did you know that even though you are part time you can still cash in your sick days?" I had 40 hours coming to me. I bought a nice Specialized Sirrus Sport. First bike I owned that didn't have friction levers. I converted my old bike to dial shift with some minor welding.

    Every time that I did a search trying to learn about components I would get linked to this website. However, I must mention that my LBS cracked up laughing when I told them that every component I asked about, they said the components are junk, "I hit a rock and the derailleur broke off".

    I think it is no mistake that I keep coming to this site. I borrowed my son in laws trek hybrid and am currently trying to explore Nassahegan State Park. I am expecting some money, not sure when or exactly how much, but I have ruled out buying a car(seems like a waste of money when I am capable of fixing old ones). I have been informed by almost everyone that I talk to that if I do not get a decent Mountain Bike I will be sorry in the long run.

  51. #51
    From my cold, dead hands
    Reputation: JayTee's Avatar
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    Dudes, have you ever heard of a credit card?? Go down to your local credit union and get a card with a really low rate and just pay it off month by month. I'm sure many will argue this isn't the most "responsible" way of doing things but what the heck, its no different than a car payment. Plus, life's way too short....get the bike of your dreams now!!

    It's how I got my dream bike a month ago and I'm LOVING it!!!



    It's also how I got my previous dream bike 5 years ago....


  52. #52
    mtbr member
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    Stumpjumper Evo All Black 2013 or 2014 model, wheel 26 or 29, i just like the model and i love the stumpy because i own a previous model.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
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    Making a decent living, driving a modestly priced car, living in a reasonable-sized house and not a mcMansion like most of my coworkers, generally not 'aspirational spending' or worrying about what others think of my finances.

    The most expensive bike in the world* doesn't seem totally out of reach, I don't dream about $10k bikes, but if I did, saving for a few months or a year isn't that hard. I'd argue most of us *could* afford most any bike we wanted, just that most want other things more.

    * I'm not talking the solid-gold foolishness, most like a $10k carbon whatever with enve rims that's constantly on the front page or pinkbike, that everyone is complaining about the fact that it exists.

  54. #54
    Trail Connoisseur
    Reputation: RIVER29's Avatar
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    I don't dream about getting it, I get it. Like others have mentioned I get some help from the use of a 0% interest credit card. But I have other strategies also. I buy my dream bike about every 2 or 3 years but I start planning for the next bike before I even know what it is.

    Here are some things I do to keep riding my dream:

    1. Sell your current bike before it's outdated. If your an early adopter, like me, you can buy the latest and greatest and sell it easy after a season of riding when the rest of the population catches on. Downside: there is risk if you early adopt a bad idea.

    2. Sell your old bike and parts when demand is high and buy your new bike when demand is low. It's like the stock market, it takes patients and research but it makes a big difference. This could be a seasonal thing or it could be a trendy thing but if you keep your finger on the pulse of what's "hot" it's easy to tell. It also helps if you live in a place where there are lots of people seeking bikes, I live in CO and this is not a problem.

    3. If your a gear head don't hold on to old bikes out of sentimental value. If you don't ride it regularly, then sell it and get your dream bike.

    4. When you do upgrades consider how that will effect the resale of the bike.

    5. Most importantly, the bike you ride is only a fraction of what creates the experience you have when you ride. If your caught up in thinking about the bike your on while you ride then you are doing it wrong. Dreaming about awesome bikes is what you do when your not riding. When you are riding you should only live in the moment.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
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    2013 Specialized Carve Pro. After Buying a 2013 Rockhopper Comp after not riding since I was 13 on a Dyno VFR and my ex gf was really into riding bikes. I was getting out of riding sport bikes and after missing two wheels I finally bought the Rockhopper. I saw that red and white Carve while buying my Comp and after a few months on the Rockhopper I had to have it. This bike is just perfect.

  56. #56
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
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    This is my dream fatbike. Built up with carbon wheels and nice hubs. Next cranks might be lighter, but I like the blue. I built it up slowly, ordering the frame and fork first, cranks next, other components slowly. Would be nice to outfit with XX1, but 1x10 is still pretty damn nice. Your dream bike. How do you dream you'd get it?-gedc0458.jpgYour dream bike. How do you dream you'd get it?-powerline2.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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