What is it with Roadies...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    What is it with Roadies...

    Although I don't know alot of "Roadies", in all my years of riding, I have only met two that weren't arrogant, rude, have nothing but distain for mountain bikes and, well you get the message. As for the six or so other road bikers I've met...see my description.
    Anyways, the weather is finally breaking here. Yesterday, it was a realatively warm, sunny 45 degree day. I put on some warm clothes and hoped on my mountain bike for a nice relaxing 12 mile ride around the neighborhood. I saw people walking, kids throwing baseballs with their dads, a couple of skateboarders of early teen ages. With everyone of these people I approached, hello's and such were exchanged.
    And then it happened, as I return home, standing beside my bike, a roadie comes cruising down the road, heading in the same direction as I was facing. No, I didn't hear him approaching from my behind. Before I realized it, he was about 50 or so yards down the road pedaling away. Then it hit me, this was the first person I had seen that day that didn't say "hi", "good day"...nothing. Anytime I see people when I'm riding, and especially cyclists, I always give a friendly wave and hello etc.
    What's up with that attitude ???

  2. #2

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    roadies

    I think it started with the damn French.

  3. #3
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    I passed 5 "roadies" yesterday. Every one of them waved and said Hi.

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    I don't think it's roadie-specific.
    I have met quite a few rude idiots on the trails. I think the disdain works both ways. Just as you have grouped all roadies as arrogant and hating mtb'ers a lot of mtb'ers feel the same about roadies.
    It's simply not true. It all depends on the person. I probably ride more on the road than trails but consider myself an avid enthusiest of both. I wouldn't hesitate to stop and help someone on the road or trail and try to say hello to everyone I encounter (hikers, bikers, equestrians, etc).
    I agree that there is a certain level of arrogance in the biking community but I don't think it's specific to one group.

  5. #5
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    Maybe theyre just jealous because theyre stuck on the road? I dont really pay attention to them, I only see them as Im driving to the trail. Although I do remember one encounter with a roadie. I was gearing up to go ride, slapped on the shin guards and I heard one of them giggle and say "Fukn kids..." I turned to him/her (a man with a bad case of gyno) and said "Go suck on Lances testicle, its lonely". Ill admit it was out of line but dont talk sh1t because Im putting on shin guards. Safety first ppl.

  6. #6

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    It's not a pleasure boat tour. There's no law or rule that says you have to wave to everyone. If I'm at mile 60 or so of a pretty climby ride, no-one is gonna be my best friend all of the sudden-like. It's about being in the zone. Cadence. Breathing. Heart rate.

    That said, I generally do try to acknowledge my fellow cyclists, as well as puppies and small children, but if I'm on my road bike and I wave to another road cyclists who doesn't repond, does that make all roadies jerks or all roadies friendly?

  7. #7

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    I like all styles of cycling...

    Right now I have two bikes, a road and a mountain bike. I enyoy myself anytime I'm on two wheels. Yea, I prefer to ride trials over road. And yes, I've even seen a few idiot mountain bikers...just without the attitude. You're probably right, some mtbr's are a**holes too.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nydave
    And then it happened, as I return home, standing beside my bike, a roadie comes cruising down the road, heading in the same direction as I was facing. No, I didn't hear him approaching from my behind. Before I realized it, he was about 50 or so yards down the road pedaling away. Then it hit me, this was the first person I had seen that day that didn't say "hi", "good day"...nothing. Anytime I see people when I'm riding, and especially cyclists, I always give a friendly wave and hello etc.
    What's up with that attitude ???
    I know the "attitude" of which you speak (not just roadies either) but I don't get it in this situation. You have your back to him and don't see him until he's passed you so I'm assuming you never even made eye contact? I live in a small, rural town and a friendly, wave-at-everyone neighborhood but I wouldn't wave or speak to someone I hadn't made eye contact with. So now you think he's got an attitude? That's a being a little over sensitive don't you think? It would be different if you had met the guy head on or were standing there watching his approach, spoke and got no response. But jeez, cut the guy some slack!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nydave
    Although I don't know alot of "Roadies", in all my years of riding, I have only met two that weren't arrogant, rude, have nothing but distain for mountain bikes and, well you get the message. As for the six or so other road bikers I've met...see my description.
    Anyways, the weather is finally breaking here. Yesterday, it was a realatively warm, sunny 45 degree day. I put on some warm clothes and hoped on my mountain bike for a nice relaxing 12 mile ride around the neighborhood. I saw people walking, kids throwing baseballs with their dads, a couple of skateboarders of early teen ages. With everyone of these people I approached, hello's and such were exchanged.
    And then it happened, as I return home, standing beside my bike, a roadie comes cruising down the road, heading in the same direction as I was facing. No, I didn't hear him approaching from my behind. Before I realized it, he was about 50 or so yards down the road pedaling away. Then it hit me, this was the first person I had seen that day that didn't say "hi", "good day"...nothing. Anytime I see people when I'm riding, and especially cyclists, I always give a friendly wave and hello etc.
    What's up with that attitude ???

    Stop it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singlespeedster
    It's not a pleasure boat tour. There's no law or rule that says you have to wave to everyone. If I'm at mile 60 or so of a pretty climby ride, no-one is gonna be my best friend all of the sudden-like. It's about being in the zone. Cadence. Breathing. Heart rate.

    That said, I generally do try to acknowledge my fellow cyclists, as well as puppies and small children, but if I'm on my road bike and I wave to another road cyclists who doesn't repond, does that make all roadies jerks or all roadies friendly?
    Six. It took 6 whole posts for the magic "in the zone" words to come up. I think that's one of the lamest things I see on here or other bike forums about why people don't wave. Kind of like people who don't smoke on a regular basis but can't pick up a beer with without lighting up. Both stupid lame excuses in my book.

    Personally, I don't care if they wave or don't and I don't think they're snobs or not based on whether they wave or not. Actually, if someone goes by and doesn't wave, I just don't think anymore about it at all. I have better things to do. I don't always wave at other bikers, either and I don't think I'm a snob in general.

    What I don't get is why people are so offended if someone doing the same activity doesn't wave at them. Are you offended if someone in a car goes by when you are driving your car and doesn't wave? OK, maybe just the same brand of car? What about if you're at the gym - do you expect every other weightlifter to wave or acknowledge you in some manner? Yeah, I'm being a little facetious here, but the point is why is someone a snob if they don't wave at you... just because they're riding a road bike?

    Sounds like you're more of the snob assuming he didn't wave just because he was on a road bike. Maybe the guy was just an ass in general. Probably won't wave to you when he passes you while he's riding his MTB either. Or driving his car. Or whatever.

    I wish bicyclists (and MTBers specifically) would quit whining when another biker doesn't acknowledge them. OK - I'll stop whining now myeslf.

  11. #11

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    Well...

    I too live in a small rural area. Let's turn it around, I'm cruising by another cyclist on my road bike, the other rider is on the side of a quiet flat section of road, taking a rest on his or her mountain bike, while passing I'd have at least given a wave or a quick "hi there". What's wrong about that or so hard to do ?
    This was like the first day in weeks of snowy wintery weather that people have been able to do something "outside". And the aforementioned roadie seemed to be the only unsocial person of the day.
    Okay, I'm a peaceable person, so I'll cut the guy some slack. But I bet if I was on my 04 Spechie Allez Comp in full road gear I'd have gotten a quick "hi there" or wave.

  12. #12
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    PM Melt...that guy will take care of them
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  13. #13
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    GAWD. Not this topic again...

    OK, Roadies are assh**es.

    Next topic please.

    p.s. yes, I'm a roadie.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nydave
    Although I don't know alot of "Roadies", in all my years of riding, I have only met two that weren't arrogant, rude, have nothing but distain for mountain bikes and, well you get the message. As for the six or so other road bikers I've met...see my description.
    Pot.

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  15. #15

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    point/counterpoint

    If you ride a road bike your mtbing getz faster.
    (Took me about 4 yrs to realize this)
    So what upgrade can you get to make your mtb the fastest it can be?
    A road bike.
    So get off the soap box,and get a road bike.
    Or maybe you just like going slow
    Last edited by Biopacebob; 03-20-2005 at 11:46 PM. Reason: Now I like it more

  16. #16
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    Seen it both

    in mountain bikers and roadies.I can't help but get a little ticked when they start giving that elitest type attitude.I see it more so in the guys who know they are fast.They try to set themselves away from the rest of the crowd and by refusing to acknowledge another rider who has given them a wave or nod,it makes them feel good about themselves at the expense of others and that's just plain wrong.I'm presently doing double century rides so I've been spending a lot more time on the road bike and I see this more often on the road,but have experienced it on the trail too.But the road more so. You have to work at being friendly.
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    My experience differs...

    I took up mtbing last March while my elbow was healing from 10+ years of rockclimbing.

    I only had the funds to buy one type of bike, so I chose a mountain bike to visit remote places.

    However, I do, on occasion, throw on some skinny slicks and ride on pavement for the mileage.

    Almost without fail, the roadies and I usually exchange a wave or some form of greeting.

    I was adjusting my seatpost once and, in the space of three minutes, I was offered help by two separate roadies.

    Hell, I even waved at some kid on a bmx and he waved back. (He was quite surprised that some grown-up would acknowledge him.) I think my profound respect for the athleticism bmx riders have must have shown through.

    Sometimes, of course, no form of greeting is exchanged. I know there were times when I didn't see them until it was too late for a quick wave. And there was this one time I was too winded to say anything because I was using alot of energy passing a roadie (the hill was steep enough that his 39 ring and my 32-15 combo made for a nice impromptu competition).

    I wave at joggers but they don't seem to wave back. Still, I wave at them anyway...

    Ironically, the only serious altercations I've experienced were mtb single track hogs who were less than courteous. Once, I even gave a guy an earful with the intent of starting a fist fight. Not my proudest moment; but I need to mention it to show that I am in no way a saint.

    On this, my second year of mtb'ing, there is still a sense of new-ness to it all. And I believe it's that very lack of cynicism that makes it so damn fun. I make it a point to remind myself to see things in a way that makes it new and fresh. With this mindset, even rockclimbing is fun again (I have the enthusiasm of a newbie yet the skills of a veteran bad-ass!)

    Bruce Lee said, "The conciousness of the self is the greatest hindrance to physical movement."

    That same "conciousness of the self" can hinder having the kind of absolute fun we experienced as kids on the first day of summer vacation...

    If others wave, then great; if not, that's okay because anyday you're doing what you love is a gift.
    Last edited by 514Climber; 03-21-2005 at 12:08 AM.

  18. #18
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    Most of the time when I'm on my road bike and encounter another rider they just stare at my bike. It might be a snobbish "gear check" but probably not. It's usually a gape of disbelief that anyone would ride such a POS.
    ever forward..., and sometimes kinda sideways

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh
    Six. It took 6 whole posts for the magic "in the zone" words to come up. I think that's one of the lamest things I see on here or other bike forums about why people don't wave.
    OK - I'll stop whining now myeslf.
    You have a lot of anger. You sem to be lashing out in every direction, at anything that moves.


    Good luck with all that.

  20. #20
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    ... and if we just ...

    The smoking analogy doesn't work because alcohol impairs judgement and ultimately will power. The saying "go ugly early to beat the rush" does not take into account the lack of judgement alcohol causes to make that leap. Smoking is much the same as one may fight the urge to smoke but when their guard is let down by the alcohol anything can happen.

    I could appreciate a roadie not being cordial if they are in the Zone. In the parking lot however it would be more enjoyable if they showed a little more humantiy to their fellow human beings.



    This is a legal disclaimer: this is not a sweeping indictment of all raodies, only the ones who are arrogant, pompous and rude. Loosen up on the spandex, it is constricting your better judgement.

  21. #21
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    Come on--REALLY. It's the Velodrome guys that are butts.

    They go round and round and round and dang near never wave at ANYbody!

    gEEEEEEEEEEEz

    But seriously--on the road around here (hill country TN) I wave at every vehicle. I get a LOT of waves back. I'm hoping that angst and mischief filled county boys---WON'T pitch a bottle or put a mirror on somebody who is friendly and doesn't spray their dogs.

    Most of the cyclist I see around here--are ME.
    I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. W.C. Fields

  22. #22

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    I don't say anything when I pass Amish buggies I'm affraid it will spook the horse, instead I make the sound of a wound out diesel. I figure it's something thier more conmfortable with
    Last edited by C.Savage; 03-21-2005 at 05:26 AM. Reason: spelling

  23. #23

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    I think a minority of roadies are snobs. I ride both on and off road and always wear my Giro Xen lid. On a few occasions I have met other roadies coming the opposite way with a mix of amusment and confusion across their faces when they see this amateur with, get this, a peak on his lid!! Then they realise that I'm actually on a top end race bike and only then do they think of acknowledging me.
    Have to say though that most people on the road in my experience are very friendly. Strangely enough, it's the 'husband and wife' teams that rarely seem to wave. I wave anyway, to anyone, even livestock.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biopacebob
    If you ride a road bike your mtbing getz faster.
    (Took me about 4 yrs to realize this)
    Or maybe you just like going slow
    Amen. I shaved something like 13 minutes off my time in the first race of our state XC series between last year and this one. The difference? Riding on the road.

    As for waving. I waved and said hello to a kid on the front porch of his trailer out in the country last week on my roadie. I guess his shepherd mix interpreted that as "that metal thing wants to kill my friend" because he took off after me like a slavering bullet. Did I mention this was on a climb? I hit 25 going uphill trying to beat that dog. Let's hear it for adrenal glands.

    I'm going to get suited up for a road ride now.

  25. #25
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    Just keep smilin'

    I ride the road quite a bit and have also experienced this phenomenon. The best thing to do is just keep smilin', wave, say hello, whatever you do. Some people just do not like to acknowledge others. Big deal.

    BTW - I wave at everyone when I am on two wheels and sometimes when in four. The best reactions are waving at the moped riders when you pass them or catching a roadie and passing them on a mountainbike.Too cool.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantB
    . Did I mention this was on a climb? I hit 25 going uphill trying to beat that dog. Let's hear it for adrenal glands.
    LOL....ain't that the ONLY time a dog will chase ya ?? seems that way in my experience

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by nydave
    Although I don't know alot of "Roadies", in all my years of riding, I have only met two that weren't arrogant, rude, have nothing but distain for mountain bikes and, well you get the message.

    What's up with that attitude ???
    They probably just don't like you.

  28. #28
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    its called training

    Hi there! I am a mountain bike racer and before I started training seriously, I had a similar take on the "roadie" situation. Now as I train on the road and the mtb I realize that not everyone is out on the road and trails for the same reason. When on a training ride one concentrates on many things including heart rate, power outage, pedal stroke, body mechanics, food/drind intake... The list goes on and on. For these reasons many bikers be it mountain or road don't have the luxury of saying "hi" and waving. Especially when they are bordering on the edge of puking.

    Hope this helps!


    QUOTE=nydave]Although I don't know alot of "Roadies", in all my years of riding, I have only met two that weren't arrogant, rude, have nothing but distain for mountain bikes and, well you get the message. As for the six or so other road bikers I've met...see my description.
    Anyways, the weather is finally breaking here. Yesterday, it was a realatively warm, sunny 45 degree day. I put on some warm clothes and hoped on my mountain bike for a nice relaxing 12 mile ride around the neighborhood. I saw people walking, kids throwing baseballs with their dads, a couple of skateboarders of early teen ages. With everyone of these people I approached, hello's and such were exchanged.
    And then it happened, as I return home, standing beside my bike, a roadie comes cruising down the road, heading in the same direction as I was facing. No, I didn't hear him approaching from my behind. Before I realized it, he was about 50 or so yards down the road pedaling away. Then it hit me, this was the first person I had seen that day that didn't say "hi", "good day"...nothing. Anytime I see people when I'm riding, and especially cyclists, I always give a friendly wave and hello etc.
    What's up with that attitude ???[/QUOTE]

  29. #29

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    Wow...

    I'll never mention this topic again...honest.
    Like I said earlier...I got a road bike last year, I like going really fast on it, I like taking longer rides to build up endurance etc., so yea, I like my road bike...it complements and improves my mountain biking also.
    That said, for me, an older slightly out of shape cyclist. Bombing thru trails on a mountain bike gives me more satifaction. I like the adrealine rush right before the occasional wipe out..lol !!
    Please forgive me for this trolling expedition, I live in a small world and wanted to hear other people's opinions...

  30. #30

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    [QUOTE=nydavey

    Please forgive me

    Oh come on now,don't be so serious either,I think we are all just doing this for fun.
    Definitly a core topic,with an opinion from everybody.
    Stop apoligizing (where's the spell checker Francis?) and ride your bike.

  31. #31

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    Orange ya glad ski areas don't have this custom? It'd get old having to wave to everyone else on the slopes.


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    You mentioned "ski"...

    okay...you better watch it now. My name ends in ski !!!
    Anyways, if this was a fishing expedition, which it was in a way...I caught alot of fish !!
    LOL

  33. #33
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    Ditto. Here in the rural SC foothills/mountains, I'm on a constant ambassador of goodwill mission. I'm waving at the cars, at the porch-sitters, other cyclists, the people telling me don't worry- the dog chasing me won't bite (but will he fit between my spokes?), the kids on bikes and trampolines, the 3-year-old standing by herself next to the road(WTF?), the guy crawling out from under that car up on blocks, you name it. If I can make some guy smile and wave, I figure he's less likely to run my ass over next Sunday. I have only had a couple of rednecks purposely get too close or give me the finger in the 4-5 years I've ridden. I can't really understand why a good 'ole boy would disrespect a woman wearing tight clothes...seems unnatrual.

    I work the same deal w/ hikers while mtn biking. Except that I'm worried they'll complan about mtb-ers to a ranger, not that they'll run over me (although some of them are big enough to.)

  34. #34
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    Someone has to start it then...

    I like APPLE PIE!



    This is the most un-passion oriented tired old tale that will not die.

    There are cool people, and less than cool people. Type of Bike? Car? House? Lifestyle? In all walks of life, 'tis the same!
    "It's better to regret something you HAVE done, than something you haven't..." -

  35. #35
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    mmmmmm

    Apple pie! That sounds so good right now. Thanks for increasing my hunger. LOL
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  36. #36
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    What the heck do you know? Those who eat apple pie cannot be trusted. It's a fact.


  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenzx
    I like APPLE PIE!



    This is the most un-passion oriented tired old tale that will not die.

    There are cool people, and less than cool people. Type of Bike? Car? House? Lifestyle? In all walks of life, 'tis the same!

    Having never chimed in on this one before, I'll put out my own ill-conceived theory:

    When you are down in the drops, head down, it takes a more concerted effort to raise a hand or elevate the eyes than it does if you are sitting up on an mtb looking forward with your hands free to wave.

    But you can always smile on your brother.

  38. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedchick
    Ditto. Here in the rural SC foothills/mountains, I'm on a constant ambassador of goodwill mission.
    Me too! Last year on the bike path (commuter to work) I flatted and my pump broke. It took me yelling and chasing down this bi... girl on a Guru (yeah, running in my road shoes, that was fun). I swore I'd help commuters and "cyclists" alike. The wierdest experience I had was when I stopped to help a guy sitting next to his bike, with a rag full of blood. I assumed he had had a crash (as he was bleeding!). He got really freaked out that someone would stop and started backing away from me... anyway, turns out he only had a bloody nose, but the fact he was so surprised that someone would stop (even when he was covered in blood) just goes to show about attitude around here.
    That said, sometimes there are so many people out that you can't acknowledge everyone...

  39. #39
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    Busted!

    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    What the heck do you know? Those who eat apple pie cannot be trusted. It's a fact.

    Guilty as charged!
    "It's better to regret something you HAVE done, than something you haven't..." -

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biopacebob
    So get off the soap box,and get a road bike.
    Or maybe you just like going slow
    So this begs the question....do you wave and if so, is it only to fast riders?
    People don't think it be like it is, but it do - Oscar Gamble

  41. #41

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    I've never found roadies to be particularly rude where I live. It seems to me this is a case of perceptions. If you have the pre-conception that roadies are a bunch of arrogant euro-wannabes(which they are ), then you are going to grab onto these trivial things to justify your view.

  42. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by nydave
    Although I don't know alot of "Roadies", in all my years of riding, I have only met two that weren't arrogant, rude, have nothing but distain for mountain bikes and, well you get the message. As for the six or so other road bikers I've met...see my description.
    Anyways, the weather is finally breaking here. Yesterday, it was a realatively warm, sunny 45 degree day. I put on some warm clothes and hoped on my mountain bike for a nice relaxing 12 mile ride around the neighborhood. I saw people walking, kids throwing baseballs with their dads, a couple of skateboarders of early teen ages. With everyone of these people I approached, hello's and such were exchanged.
    And then it happened, as I return home, standing beside my bike, a roadie comes cruising down the road, heading in the same direction as I was facing. No, I didn't hear him approaching from my behind. Before I realized it, he was about 50 or so yards down the road pedaling away. Then it hit me, this was the first person I had seen that day that didn't say "hi", "good day"...nothing. Anytime I see people when I'm riding, and especially cyclists, I always give a friendly wave and hello etc.
    What's up with that attitude ???

    I think it's got more to do with the type of people in your area. I live in a small tourist town and 99% of the locals wave when we see another rider. Roadie, mtb'er, ss'er, frerider or whatever. The tourists on the other hand never wave.

  43. #43
    Trail rider and racer
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    Roadies and mountain bikers = Much of a muchness = Cyclists = The same thing

    The whole separate attitude things and that "them and us attitude" is probably laughable at best - particularly when taken seriously. Roadies and mountain bikers are all the same, passionate, serious, not too serious, out to have fun etc. The difference if any is that on the road the etiquette is different.

    I passed one or two snobby roadies but so too have I passed snobby mountain bikers.
    Trev!

  44. #44

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    Well, a friend who has worked in bike shops for over 10 years did comment roadies are more "A-type" personalities. That doesn't mean they're rude people or anything, but there might be some personality differences when you take large enough groups.

    EDIT:

    The only real beef I have with roadies, now I'm thinking about it, is that every now and then there will be a group that rides 3 or 4 abreast in the middle of the street. I always accomodate roadies when I'm driving, but common sense has to prevail both ways. On a busy street with only 1 lane on each side you can't expect all the cars to swerve into the opposite lane so you can ride side by side.
    Last edited by Lighty_; 03-21-2005 at 03:03 PM.

  45. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantB
    As for waving. I waved and said hello to a kid on the front porch of his trailer out in the country last week on my roadie. I guess his shepherd mix interpreted that as "that metal thing wants to kill my friend" because he took off after me like a slavering bullet. Did I mention this was on a climb? I hit 25 going uphill trying to beat that dog. Let's hear it for adrenal glands.

    Hahahahah! I just had to acknowledge this, the same thing has happend to me on my mtb.

  46. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Weasel
    So this begs the question....do you wave and if so, is it only to fast riders?
    Today I waved.
    I waved to a portly lady riding a Roadmaster,she was certainly slow,and totally ignoring me.
    I stopped to ask a lady "can I pick your Grapefruit?" and she said "yes".I said "le pomplemousse!" she said "what does that mean?" I said "the grapefruit!"

    ...what a great cultural exchange this waving thing is!
    .

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    Good job! These days,the roadies are cool.

    I used to ride track bikes before I got into mountain bikes back in 1987. I used to think mountain bikes wouldn't last until I rode one.
    In 1989,I remember that roadies would always snub me if I gave them a wave from my mtb.When out on the trail I'd always run into another offroader and we'd talk bikes or whatever. Strangers would high-five me when we rode past each other. It was such an eightie's scene. Things were cool.
    2005,I'm riding along one of my favorite trails in Los Gatos where it's a mix of paved and single track,and I get snubbed by offroaders and get acknowledged by roadies.The only greatings I do get from offroaders are from guys my age. The younger riders have picked up the old roadie attitude. Not all young riders are snobs but I do see a change in attitude.
    One day last summer,I was riding my 1991 Ritchey and my rear tire blew.My spare tube had a damaged presta valve so I ended up walking the bike to my car roughly three miles away.
    Alot of new school mountain bikers and a couple of old farts rode past without even a look-see but five different roadies stopped in the middle of their ride and offered to help me despite the fact they didn't have a spare tube or a tool that I needed to fix my bike.
    Those five roadies convinced me that roadies today are ok people. I also know that if you can keep up with a hardcore roadie on a full knobbied mountain bike and you are willing to pull him instead of hanging off his rear wheel without switching,he or a group would know you're a serious rider and not just a poser on a mountain bike.
    Yeah,I wish for the old days sometimes but life goes on.
    To those five roadies,I'd like to say thanks.

  48. #48

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    Roadies make for good interval partners on the road.

    Quote Originally Posted by Built4Speed
    I
    Those five roadies convinced me that roadies today are ok people. I also know that if you can keep up with a hardcore roadie on a full knobbied mountain bike and you are willing to pull him instead of hanging off his rear wheel without switching,he or a group would know you're a serious rider and not just a poser on a mountain bike.
    Yeah,I wish for the old days sometimes but life goes on.
    To those five roadies,I'd like to say thanks.
    I also find about 85+% of the roadies to be very nice. I spend a lot of time out on road climbs on my mtn bike, especially when there is too much mud on the trails.
    I like to ride along with other riders or with a group of road bikes...
    One problem I do have though is that if they are going along at a fair clip, its all I can do to hang on in the rear getting a draft.. This is especially true if the climb is mild or if we hit level spots. If i was to go out front I would find two things happening.
    First, I think lots of them would think i was showing off, and second, I could not last out front very long without burning out. Between the extra weight, the knobbies, bad aero and being well over 50, I have to really work hard to just stay with them if they are well trained and under forty five.
    Most are OK with my tagging along, but a few get upset. I sometimes ask if its OK.
    Only a few say NO....
    If they end up going too slow, I'll ride along side and chat. I seldom try to show them up by passing them on the hills if they begin to fade, unless they really run out of gas.
    Best exercise of all is when they, as a group, try to drop the mtn biker, and its a race to hang on until the top.
    All in all I find them, rider for rider, to be equally as friendly as mtn bikers........
    Best thing about riding out on the road on a mtn bike is that there is steady supply of roadies to give you a good pace if you're on a mtn bike.. Take that same mtn bike on the trails and you could go all day without encountering someone to share a hard pace with.
    I find it much easier to get excellent workouts because so many roadies oblige by being my rabbit. Some younger fit ones dust me, but in my initial attemps to keep up, they give me good interval training for a few minutes......
    All in all, I've got no complaints about roadies.........helpful, friendly, and provide loads of fun with their pace.

  49. #49
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    Air drag.

    One: Because of air drag.
    Waving is about the stupidist thing you can do when you are trying to keep air drag to a minimum. I can't believe noone mentioned this already. Duuuhhh.

    Two: Because it's dangerous.
    And if you're in the drops it's probably a pain in the arse to look up and nod (because your neck is already fully extended) or to wave, because you're bending over all funny like that.

    Three: The colors mess with your head. They make you all nervous and competitive. It's a comercial thing or something.

    (I can only say all this because I'm a dork too.)

    Four: How do you get a one armed mountain biker out of a tree?

  50. #50

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    Fair go, mate. There is a reason they don't wave.

    I had a ride on my brother's road bike the other day and I didn't wave either. The truth is that these things have tyres that are thinner than condoms pumped up to 3 quadazillion lbssqin, so when you're riding you're much too busy avoiding grains of sand on the road to have time for social activities.

    The other reason is that their lycra is so tight that waving compresses the fabric in their groin area and acts like a testicle clamp.

    So keep waving to them, they need your love.

  51. #51
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    Have you ever spent time on the cycling forums web site. It's like night and day from MTBR and I think it speaks volumes. That being said, there are great people on both sites, just seems like more arrogant people on the cycling site.

    I do ride on both roads and trails and have found everyone to be nice, but then I live in Canada and we have laws about having to be nice to your neighboor!

  52. #52
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    I don't know about this waving thing because I find mountain bikers fail to wave as much as roadies do. One thing I do know, and have noticed, is roadies are a very inviting crowd once you have a road bike. My wife and I bought new road bikes recently and all the roadies are coming out of the wood work, it's like they smell fresh meat. Everyone is talking about getting together for rides and such, they seem pretty friendly to me. Even on the road with my mountain bike I haven't many problems with them. The only time there are issues is when we run into a large group of them that are on training rides. Those groups are into themselves and I'm sure I'd be the same way if I was as focussed on what I was doing....

    Overall we need to cut everyone some slack and relax...If you wanna wave, wave, but don't expect anything in return...That way if they do wave you'll feel even better...

    Rich
    "The meek shall inherit the earth"

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