Mountain biker road biking. My perspectives.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mountain biker road biking. My perspectives.

    I have always considered myself a mtn biker. Been mtn biking for about 10 years and last winter I bough a road bike to supplement my mtn biking. This winter I found myself spending a lot more miles on the road bike than my mtn bike. Not necessary a bad thing, I guess. So, after 2 seasons here are my perspectives on road biking.

    1. Road biking is more dangerous than mtn biking. No doubt in my mind. Sharing Highway-9 with CBR-Rs, WRXs and the occasional Ferrari is more dangerous than any mtn bike trails that I have been on. Then there are the proverbial minivan drivers that do not understand the concept of checking one’s blind spot.

    2. Road biking brings out vanity in me. An example of a conversation that goes on in my head: “Should I wear the navy blue arm warmers to match my blue-yellow-red jersey or should I wear my team Cantina/Tollo long sleeves jersey with matching bib shorts. Hmmm... guess not, I wore that last week ….. “

    3. Metrics. Just today, I did a 45km ride climbing 1,300 meters on my 51cm bike. It was a beautiful 10C morning when I got started. When I was done with my ride, I think I burned about 4,000 kilojoules.

    4. Technology & safety. Stopping the road bike from 40 mph , ahem .. 64 kmh, with rims brakes on 23c tires and rigid fork scares the hell out of me. Goes back to point 1. Anyway, I think in order to make road biking safer it will need disc brakes, fatter tires, maybe front suspension and … oh, never mind.

    5. Weight Weenism take on a whole new level. e.g. my 22lbs 12.56 oz boat anchor.



    6. Humility is a good virtue to have. I consider myself an intermediate mtn biker. One two races a year. Loves long fire road climbs etc. Still, quite often I have my a** handed to me by ‘older’ riders on double chain rings.

    7. Campy rocks !

    Cheers,
    Gak

  2. #2
    Ride what you want!!
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    I've been riding road a few more years that you, but dirt just as long, some stuff that I've also noticed...

    8. You chat more on a road bike. You spend a lot of time riding next to someone and you can talk. You usually only talk while mtbing while regrouping.

    9. I have to agree that road biking feels more dangerous that mtbing. Long descents on the dirt may have rocks, drops, ruts and high speed, but a smooth road on skinny tires with tiny brakes feels way scarier. Plus, I'd rather go down on dirt with some thick baggies and some padding then on asphalt with some thin Lycra.

    10. They are both a hell of a lot of fun.

    george
    Trogs: Too Tough for Carbon Fiber

  3. #3
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    my list

    1: road bikes aren't as strong as bmx's. learned that when i got my first road bike
    i had been riding my dirt bike for sooo long that i out of habit hopped of a curb at the light and my front fork colasped (curb was only 4 inches too) got stabbed by the old school shifters and the brakes ....nothing too bad just a lotta pain...fork was warrenteed ...

    2 : you can lean way in on the turns ...unless your on somthing other than asphault then you just go down ...like going balls out in a sand trap but its only some water on the sidewalk....

    2: i can't say enough about how much faster i have became on my road bike in the last few months ...you get time to focus on the little things about how you ride and pedal ...

    4: i miss riding on single track

    5: i miss being airborn ...

    6 : yes i hate commuting ...i hate it when the a$$whole at the light has to rev his engine and burn rubber when he pulls away ...i hate being cut off by some dip in a ford f- 150
    and with all that i am still better off on the bike at least i can take the bike path half the way ...don't you just love driving in our modern world ...

    7: any one who says road biking is for wimps is fooling themselves. when you realize how much faster guys like lance are it's VERY humbling ...i had a friend who raced road in high school who got run off the road on route 4 in the jemez while he was going around 30mph and that was not a pretty site, one entire side of his body was scab ...
    i don't understand why roadies don't wear some kinda armour ... and a full face for commuting ...

    need to go out on group rides more but i need to get off my ass and look for groups to ride with ...

    love my road bike it makes me faster and better and when i get my xc bike i will still ride my road and still take 20 -30 mile trips on that too ...it is a wonderfully smooth feeling like flying ...but ohhhhh man when i get my xc bike ....
    ______
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  4. #4
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    I cannot quite compare, but yesterday I did my first ride on slicks. It was one of those fund raiser events that are well organized with lots of people. It was 87km total. I put some 1" slicks on my bike which are about the same width as lots of road bikes. I wound down the u-turn on my fork and off I went.
    All I can say is although it was painfull and I tried to stay with all the roadies, it was soo good. I am now looking into getting a road bike cause I thought it was awesome. Although I hate having cars wizz past, and lots of people scream something out at you as they go past in their cars.
    Afterwards I put the mountain bike tires back on the bike and went for a quick ride, I felt so slow and also I felt like I was king of the world cause I was on a huge bike!
    I am just hopeing I don't turn into a roadie!! As long as I do wheelies and front manuals on my thin slicks I quess I can't be classed as a roadie

  5. #5
    Nat
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    My old roomie and I used to discuss the impact of crashing on a mountain bike v. a road bike. I was a die-hard mountain biker and he was a die-hard road cyclist. I maintained that if I had to choose, I'd rather crash off-road since soil is relatively softer than pavement, and there's less likely to be broken glass and other debris to get ground into your skin. You'd also probably be moving more slowly when you went down.

    On the other hand, he maintained that you are more likely to fall on a mountain bike since there's less friction between the tires and the ground, and when you do fall, there would be rocks and stumps and other nasty bits to beat you up. I felt totally confident at speed on singletrack and nervous on pavement, and he was exactly opposite.

    I now enjoy both types of riding, but feel that road riding is more potentially catastrophic due to the actions of others (motorists). Off road, if you crash it's most likely due to your own flubber, and you probably won't die.

  6. #6
    DSR
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    Great thread! Yes, the road is very fun indeed. Couple additional thoughts...

    - On crashing - Road is much scarier. Don't know why, but probably the combo of speed and asphalt. I've gone down countless times on the mtb and jump right back on without any concerns. I've gone down twice on the road bike, both in turns (once gravel, the other a slick white line) and it's taken several weeks to get my confidence back
    - Miles - Fun to crank out lots of fast miles
    - Lack of commute - Very nice to be able to just roll out of the driveway

    All that being said, I just picked up a cross bike after selling my old one a couple years ago. So much fun to be able to hit the road to a fireroad to a trail and back. Awesome. S

  7. #7
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    Couple More thoughts:

    For years I always swore I would never ride a rode bike. After having all my friends wait for me forever on the the climbs on I decided to give it a try. My first few road rides scared the crap out of me! The cars, the speed, the decents Then I got used to it and my MTB speed tok a huge leep forward. Now I spend about half my time on the road bike, I love it, but my passion is the MTB.
    Road riding makes you MUCH faster! Doing centuries is a blast as well.

  8. #8
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    Partially right

    Quote Originally Posted by george_da_trog
    I've been riding road a few more years that you, but dirt just as long, some stuff that I've also noticed...

    8. You chat more on a road bike. You spend a lot of time riding next to someone and you can talk. You usually only talk while mtbing while regrouping.

    9. I have to agree that road biking feels more dangerous that mtbing.

    george
    8.1 We talk on MTB's, at least on the climbs or gnarly areas, there's no wind noise or traffic noise to bother us. As for regroupings, they can be frequent. I've never never never seen a roadie group stop, turn around and say "Can you clean that ?" LOL

    9.1 It is more dangerous. In Westlake Village an unfortunate rider was off the road changing a flat when a driver in a car reached down for a CD .... The rider was run over and decapitated!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    I now enjoy both types of riding, but feel that road riding is more potentially catastrophic due to the actions of others (motorists). Off road, if you crash it's most likely due to your own flubber, and you probably won't die.

    I think this is what gives roadies the bad rep. While riding in a pack, you depend on the safe actions of others, other riders too. If you get a newbie in there who doesn't know how to ride he will hurt a lot of people. If you do something stupid around a group of road riders, you're going to hear about it. But when it's all working smoothly, it's a beautiful thing.

    I drove support for the Master 4/5's at the McClane Pacific yesterday and saw some crashes. One was on a smooth wide section of road where one guy just wasn't paying attention and took out 12 others... 11 got up. He hit his head quite hard. He couldn't remember where he was our how he got there. I waited with the him until help showed up.

    george
    Trogs: Too Tough for Carbon Fiber

  10. #10
    PITY THE FOOL!
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    20 minutes into a 2 hour road ride Saturday morning my friend says to me " So, have you crashed on that thing yet?"

    I almost turned around and went home. Talk about a jinx.

    We are both converted mountain bikers with way more dirt time than road time and he's still pretty tenative on the decents and turns. I agree that the road seems much more dangerous and I'd certainly rather take a hard spill on the dirt. It was fun however and it was really cool seeing about 100 other roadies out on a Sat. morning heading up/down the coast. Finishing off a 2 hour ride with a nasty climb straight up the steepest hill in town is satisfying to say the least.
    "Badges? We don't need no stinkin badges!"

  11. #11
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    Some other thoughts ...

    Road riding makes you pay attention to how you do little things (with generally fewer distractions around) -

    I found that I paid much more attention to my pedal stroke and cadence on a road bike because I generally didn't have to worry about rocks, logs etc. I found that I got focussed on pedalling smoothly and efficiently, and managing smooth transitions between climbs, descents and flats - which makes a pretty big difference. You can also get into a rythm or "zone" on a road bike more easily with fewer hazards around to deal with.

    I also found that I make more effort to anticipate things on a road bike versus a mountian bike, because you can't depend on fat tires, disk brakes and suspension to bail you out. Being smooth is key, and that doesn't hurt you when you go offroad.

    The twitchy steering on a road bike takes a bit of learning, which I thinks helps you out on the dirt.

    You can also ride way more miles with less effort. Being able to ride roads with no or very few cars is a huge bonus. I ride a cyclocross bike so I can ride offroad too where there are zero cars.D.
    You be you. I'll be riding.

  12. #12
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    great thread!! we should probably post it over on roadbikereview.com to see what the 'other side' thinks...

    i primarily ride my road bike in the winter to keep my fat butt in shape when the trails are wet in the bay area. while i like riding on the road, i too am scared s***less by the thought of impacting with a car. most of my road rides are on less travelled areas back in horse country not too far from my home. i'm lucky to have that....

    personally i find road riding less comfortable and technically challenging but do enjoy the spinning for a few hours as well as the speed. i can't see myself becoming a 'roadie' also because i really enjoy being off the beaten path in the parks and enjoying the quiet and natural setting that you get on a mtn bike..

  13. #13
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    I'll chime in..

    Afetr being a die hard roadie for years I took a hiatus to try dirt and never looked back (almost). Last fall, I picked up a sweet road rig thinking I'd use it to train and just see if I still had a thing for the road. Flash forward to late February and after only 6 rides or so, I sold it! For me, I love the dirt, I love the woods, I love laughing at my buddy when he stacks (as opposed to yelling for 911 when it happens on the road - drama, I know, but you get the point). Its no knock on road riding at all. I think I just simply burned out years ago.

    We've covered dirt and road but what about park? Since we are talking crashing (in threads above), I have to mention that crashing while dropping in off a 10' vert ramp is right up there with the worst road crashes I had ever had. Problem is that there isn't any way to learn it right unless you just do it.
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  14. #14

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    Road riding? Are you crazy?

    I've been on the dirt....a very long time. No evil downhill or off-camber hairpin turn has scared me as much as riding with cars. After having been hit twice, I avoid pavement at all costs - it's dangerous out there.

  15. #15
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    Lesson 1.1 - Bad drivers come in all race/gender/vehicle -- from old Chinese lady in Camery to rich (I'm going through mid-life crisis) white dude in Boxer.

    Lesson 1.2 - Camelbak is a no-no. It doesn't matter how much water/stuff it can carry or how much easier it is to drink -- it just isn't cool to wear one on the road (or so I've been told).

    K-Zero (bi-cyclist)
    "It's not how good you are, it's how good you want to be"

  16. #16
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    kzero: not sure i agree with you on the camelbaks...i see lots of roadies around here using them, maybe not so much the big mule and hawg, but the smaller water-only ones are pretty common. they are just too convenient even in spandex!!

  17. #17
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    Roadies ruined my day

    1st I agree with all the danger points, and wish to add:

    9.1) you inhale the equiv. of 50 kilos of black soot per ride on the road, unlike MTBing where you inhale real air in a real forest. (not a dig at roadies, but to reinforce the danger part)

    2nd: I blew a tire, and a roadie stopped to help me as I asked him to ensure I wasn't going to ruin the rim on the borrowed expensive bike I was on. He was most friendly & courteous, helpful and gave me his card and invited me on the next weekend's road ride, and hoped I'd be there. This ruined my vision of rude roadies I've "heard" about over the years, now I can't sleep.

    Jim (sticking to MTBing for now, roadie is dang-ger-ous!)

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cohenfive
    i see lots of roadies around here using them
    Do you ride in Bay Area as well? I ride on Foothill Expy and the only ones I see wearing camelbak are casual/recreational type riders. Then again, this area is saturated with team-racer type.

    K-Zero
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  19. #19
    fc
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    love the thread. I agree with what's been said so far. Good insight guys. Here's a few more and I'll try to put in some different angles too:

    Crashing - Yes, in road biking crashing is a high stakes game. They say: "There's two kinds of road bikers, ones that that have crashed and the ones that haven't". They say you're a changed person after your first real road crash. In mountain biking, if you haven't crashed after a couple of years of riding, you're a freak or a wussy.

    Mind you, I've been road riding for three years and I haven't crashed. When it happens, it will not be a happy day. I can get skinned, maimed, or much worse. It's one of those things that just sucks to know is going to happen eventually.

    Obviously, worse than crashing from your own mistake is getting taken out by a car or another rider. George is right, that's why some roadies are so aggro. The stakes are very high.


    Metrics - I don't ride with a mountain bike computer. On the road bike, I have the speedometer, altimeter, hrm and I need more data! Road riding is great for training so all these metrics are cool. Also, it's not as eventful so there's more time to futz around with the data.


    Time - If you can road ride from your doorstep and hit some back roads and some lane and a half road climbs, then you've hit one of the greatest selling points of road biking. In the time it gets you to load up your car and get to the mountain bike trailhead and back, you could do a lot on a road bike. In 1.5 hours, you can ride 20 miles and climb 2000 feet. Get in a full weekday workout while the family is taking a nap.


    Fitness - Road bikers are more fit... because it's easier to get fit. Here's why:
    - you ride more throughout the year
    - there's no fun to get in the way of fitness (jumps, stunts, tricks)
    - you're always pedaling (even downhill)
    - you get out more (specially if you can ride from your doorstep)
    - riding in packs can be an amazing workout even on flat roads or rolling hills.


    Road bikers are not as friendly - You take 10 mountain bikers and 10 road bikers, chances are more of the mountain bikers are going to be more chatty, smiley, happy go lucky. Not to say that none of the 10 road bikers are going to be super friendly... just not as many. One very interesting thing though is the typical road biker is changing. A lot of them are hardcore mountain bikers getting into this road thing. I think it's really infecting the road group. More smiles have been seen in a local road ride recently.


    Getting dropped - I think you really haven't experienced road riding until you've ridden in a pack of 50 or more. Not just any pack, but a pack that goes 5 mph faster than you could alone. Experiencing the draft, keeping the line, the ebbs and flows inside the pack, is totally addicting. And finally, getting dropped on a slight climb or start of a descent is enlightening. You're 20 feet behind the pack and the wind hits you. You fight to get back but your lungs are going to explode. 20 feet becomes 50, 200 very quickly. There's no catching them. It's time to ride alone. Riding in fast packs means riding at someone else's pace. When someone attacks or accelerates, you have to follow. When a gap opens up, you or someone has to close. This is very different from mountain biking. You can't ride at your own pace and catch them later. Because of the draft, hang on now or say bye to the pack.


    I have a few more thoughts but this is long enough. I make some bold statements but bottom line is I love road riding. It adds to the cycling spectrum and I hope everyone has a chance to experience it at some point.

    francois

  20. #20
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    What's with the negative waves?

    Covering 70-80 miles under your own power in an afternoon, comfortably, is fun.
    Going 50+ is fun.
    Passing cars is REAL fun.
    Drag racing your friends to the county line is fun, especially when you crush them.
    A rolling paceline at 28+ is fun. And beautiful.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  21. #21
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    My perspective...

    Great thread. I too am a MTB junkie who recently purchased a road bike. Initially I bought the bike to do the MS150 ride with a group of other guys. During my training rides I discovered what I actually was having FUN riding the road bike. The speed is definitely addicting.

    But what really surprised me is how much better my pedal stroke has become on my MTB now that I have developed into a strong road rider. I am way faster on my MTB and have much better endurance over distances.

    I ride the road bike and the mountain bike about 50/50. There are a number of really cool road bike rides in the Phoenix area as well as some really cool MTB rides. Just like I wondered how much fun I would have on the MTB in other "less interesting" areas of the country, I wonder if I would ride the road bike if there wasn't the Arizona scenery to keep me interested.

    Thx...Doug

  22. #22
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    nice pot!

    Anagama, no? We have a guy in town who does anagama firings and I have grown to like them a lot.

    I like the road because I can spin for long periods of time. No shifting, no change in cadence, just circles making circles making me go. Some people talk about the "zen" of mtb, but that is a much more active "in the moment" than the road for me. And you can GO places. Like start in one town and end up in another, or loop through several towns.

    Oh, and field sprints. I can't climb worth a darn, and braking on downhills is always an adventure for someone my size, but give me a flat sprint and a few people around me and I WILL throw down!
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  23. #23
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by george_da_trog
    While riding in a pack, you depend on the safe actions of others, other riders too. If you get a newbie in there who doesn't know how to ride he will hurt a lot of people. If you do something stupid around a group of road riders, you're going to hear about it. But when it's all working smoothly, it's a beautiful thing.

    george

    Just last week I was out for a slow, solo road ride to shake out the cobwebs from my legs. I heard some noise from behind and looked back to see four or five riders had latched on. No biggie. About two minutes later our mini-group went into a roundabout, and coming in from a different direction was a larger group of about two dozen. Suddenly, with hardly any warning, kaboom! I was at the front of a group of about 30! I think it was a local shop training ride, that wanted to pick up the pace a bit. I kept thinking to myself, "Don't take anyone out! Don't take anyone out!"

  24. #24
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    One statement will sum it all up! Plus....

    Mountain Biking was born from Road Biking.

    Plus.......anyone want to TRY to hang with a professional Road Cyclist? trust me you would be looking at your lunch.

    one word- TOUGH

  25. #25
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    since i cannot see any other pottery images i will asume that the nice pot is for me

    Quote Originally Posted by dr hoo
    Anagama, no? We have a guy in town who does anagama firings and I have grown to like them a lot.

    I like the road because I can spin for long periods of time. No shifting, no change in cadence, just circles making circles making me go. Some people talk about the "zen" of mtb, but that is a much more active "in the moment" than the road for me. And you can GO places. Like start in one town and end up in another, or loop through several towns.

    Oh, and field sprints. I can't climb worth a darn, and braking on downhills is always an adventure for someone my size, but give me a flat sprint and a few people around me and I WILL throw down!

    thanks ...it is one of mine but it is not an anagama ...still don't have enough money to participate in the local anagma firing ...and don't have time to help fire the kiln (only takes 12 days )

    soon though ...still have $900 to pay on my new xc bike and then i will get in to the anagama in fall

    yeah i love the sprinting ...and for me the climbs are my favorite part ...it feels good to conquer the hill in a higher gear than normal and if i stand while climbing if my cadence is right i shoot right up to the top ...still working on standing on climbs for longer periods ...

    and now there is this voice in the background of my mind that wants a ti frame or a carbon fame ...no like i need one but ohhhhh

    i guess i'm never gona be satisfied with my current ride
    ______
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  26. #26

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    Fixed gear road biking is the only way to go!

    I also have been a mountain biker for many years, but I moved closer to Downtown Kansas City, and found myself pushing bigger gears while commuting on my slick-ed MTB, so I got a Bianchi Pista, fixed gear track bike, (with a front brake), and I LOVE IT! I obsess about riding my bike and can't wait to get back on the bike.

    When I step on the pedals, that mother flies! And I'm sure I can't go as fast downhill as someone with a big ring and a freewheel, but I figured out that I only want to go as fast as ths bike takes me.

    I'm in the process of getting my mountain bike converted to fixed as well, and its almost like a religion, you really don't know what its like until you've tried it...

    Mike Coons
    Kansas City, KS

  27. #27
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    Wow ! Quite a few road bikers among us.

    So far I have always ridden alone on my road bike and have never ridden in a group ride. Maybe it is lack of confidence or fear of putting my life in others' hands or just plan anti-social.

    I do get the impression that group road rides are more formal and group mtn bikes are definitely more casual. However, I would like to try a group road ride sometime. Looks fun and sounds fun too.

    I would like to know if there are any general etiquettes/guidelines - drafting, not stay too close, secret hand shakes etc.

    Cheers,
    Gak

    Confession : I have been checking out steelmancycles.com once a week to drool over their 'Bike of the week'.
    Last edited by Gakster; 03-15-2004 at 11:25 PM. Reason: punctuations

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gakster
    I would like to know if there are any general etiquettes/guidelines - drafting, not stay too close, secret hand shakes etc.
    One of the most useful sites out there for aspiring roadies is roadbikerider.com. Here's their paceline ettiquette blurb

    http://roadbikerider.com/articles2.h...20a%20Paceline

    and I suggest road newbies sign up for their weekly e-newsletter as well. Its free and spam free too.

    Saddlebred's southeasterncycling.com also has a brief ettiquette page with some additional links:

    http://www.sadlebred.com/groupriderules.html
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  29. #29
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    Hey me too. I'm busy eating a bunch of words about how I'd never ride a road bike 'cause it's so dangerous. BUT....

    I live in the sticks north of town in the foothills of the Blue Ridge. I can roll out of my driveway and be climbing small mountains in 30 minutes. There are few cars. It was an offer I couldn't refuse.

    It's an excuse to buy another Litespeed.

    All my damn friends have turned into roadies, I had to get a roadie bike if I ever wanted to see them again. If there's anyone reading who switched from 100% mtb to 5% mtb with the rest road, could you please explain to me why? For the life of me, I can't understand why anyone would think road biking was more fun. It's fun...but so, so, so much LESS fun than mtb.

  30. #30
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    You threw that? Good job!

    That is a very nice form, not that I am an expert or anything.

    It has the look of anagama (at low resolution avatar size at least), my bad.

    I like conquering hills too, I just do it REAL slow. At the top I celebrate my victory with phrases like "GAaaaagh, cough cough, wheeze".
    Join the Turtle Clan!

  31. #31
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    Road gathering!

    After reading all the replies I got a laugh thinking of how funny a road gathering would be. Sounds like there are some excellent roadies in our mist however it also sounds like there are a lot of cross-overs like myself. I'd love to see all of us trying to paceline without taking each other out.

    Baggies, visors and camelbaks and bunnyhopping pot holes.... Man, that would be a hillarious site rolling down the road.
    "Badges? We don't need no stinkin badges!"

  32. #32
    jrm
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    I rode with a group on Sunday

    Quote Originally Posted by george_da_trog
    I think this is what gives roadies the bad rep. While riding in a pack, you depend on the safe actions of others, other riders too. If you get a newbie in there who doesn't know how to ride he will hurt a lot of people. If you do something stupid around a group of road riders, you're going to hear about it. But when it's all working smoothly, it's a beautiful thing.

    I drove support for the Master 4/5's at the McClane Pacific yesterday and saw some crashes. One was on a smooth wide section of road where one guy just wasn't paying attention and took out 12 others... 11 got up. He hit his head quite hard. He couldn't remember where he was our how he got there. I waited with the him until help showed up.

    george
    And they ran almost every stop sign and/or intersection. Great ride though...

    PS yes i stopped at all interesections....

  33. #33
    jrm
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    You should really do a group road ride

    Quote Originally Posted by Gakster
    So far I have always ridden alone on my road bike and have never ridden in a group ride. Maybe it is lack of confidence or fear of putting my life in others' hands or just plan anti-social.

    I do get the impression that group road rides are more formal and group mtn bikes are definitely more casual. However, I would like to try a group road ride sometime. Looks fun and sounds fun too.

    I would like to know if there are any general etiquettes/guidelines - drafting, not stay too close, secret hand shakes etc.

    Cheers,
    Gak

    Confession : I have been checking out steelmancycles.com once a week to drool over their 'Bike of the week'.
    Its a good fitness guage. And you can learn to compartmentize your efforts and pace. And hauling ass on descents is so cool....

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm
    And they ran almost every stop sign and/or intersection. Great ride though...

    PS yes i stopped at all interesections....
    that reminds me of one pet peeve of roadies....they don't obey traffic laws which adds to the danger...i was in our car driving back from watching my daughter ride her horse yesterday around dusk. we were going uphill to our street and had our turn signal on to turn at the stop sign....there was a roadie coming down the hill at a good clip. i couldn't believe that the biker would just bomb on past, right through the intersection, but that's exactly what he did. my daughter was flabbergasted at the guy--good thing she was paying attention (she was driving)....

  35. #35
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    Yeah i know what you mean

    Quote Originally Posted by cohenfive
    that reminds me of one pet peeve of roadies....they don't obey traffic laws which adds to the danger...i was in our car driving back from watching my daughter ride her horse yesterday around dusk. we were going uphill to our street and had our turn signal on to turn at the stop sign....there was a roadie coming down the hill at a good clip. i couldn't believe that the biker would just bomb on past, right through the intersection, but that's exactly what he did. my daughter was flabbergasted at the guy--good thing she was paying attention (she was driving)....
    Hey you only gotta get whacked once. Ive seen to many close calls and near misses. Add to that the presence of 3K vehicles piloted by the easily distracted and absent minded. Face it the odds are against you...

    i rode ONCE with this guy from work who passed through intersections against lights and everything. I was sitting there with other cyclists watching this idiot wobble his way through four way intersections. I see alot of intersection running on my commute too.

  36. #36
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    The road goes on forever

    Say, I bet there's a song in that line...

    I have great roads west, south and east of my house. ( North is a big lake). Just hop on and go. A mile south is a county highway, once I'm over that there is very little car traffic. It's 3 miles to the nearest town east, 20 or 30 miles west, and I can do a 45 or 55 mile loop south and see nothing but farms and cows, hills and trees. It's a century round trip to my parent's place and back, and there's a 10 mile stretch of road with the biggest hills in this part of the state.

    The buzz from a fast road ride is like nothing else, OTOH it can really hurt if you bonk. But trail riding is just plain fun.

    I'm currently scouting the route to my favorite trails, about 35-40 miles west. I want to put slicks and racks on my mountain bike, ride out and camp overnight, then do the trails the next day, and ride home.

    Safety: I haven't been hit by a car yet (only while running), but I almost had to lay my bike down at 25-30 mph last summer when a big old SUV turned across my lane in front of me, and it looked like my brakes weren't going to do it. Fortunately, the idiot driver hit the gas hard just in time.

    I tore the deraileur off 2 (3?) years ago when my spare innertube dropped into the gears and locked the rear wheel. I managed to stay on it until my speed was down under 10 mph. I wasn't hurt much but nearly cried to see my bike. I've had 2 mild concussions (headaches for several days afterward), one in another road crash, and the other biking a ski hill (watch out for those water pipes, they are nasty). It's about a toss up between the road bike and the mountain bike, but I've ridden a lot more on my road bike. OTOH, I got a late start on mountain biking and you could argue that my skills aren't the best.

    My $0.02: the crashes are less frequent on a road bike, but the potential for dying/severe injury is probably greater on the road, partly due to the speed, mostly to the presence of cars. Unless you're doing big drops. I feel strongly that wheels were meant to stay on the ground, except for a bunny hop, the classy way to cross railroad tracks.

    Walt

  37. #37

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    Roadies are a moving fashion show

    My father in law is a big time roadie It is important I mention he lives in CA (sacremento area) The first time I met my father in law he invited me for a ride and offered to let me borrow some riding gear his guest closet is full of jerseys of every color and sleave length, to match the many different colored helmets and gloves he has in the garage. The only jerseys I have I either won or were given to me. My first thought was oh my gosh my father in law is a poser. but then when I went out with him and the group he rides with I was shocked it is something about roadie culture 90% match their clothes!!! And not just his buddies. Since that ride every time we go to california to visit my inlaws I go riding in fact I was just there last week I am always amazed how many roadies are out on saturdays and sundays CA is truely a biking state. we went on a 70 mile ride and I bet I saw no less that 125 other bikers. Some of the groups were even dressed alike (7 bikers drafting eachother in matching jerseys)
    Where I grew up in michigan road bikers are just not as common of a site on the road My dad is a roadie I grew up attending his triathalons but he trained mostly by himself and Had absolutely no regard for color coordination. He dressed for comfort and the tempurature. Perhaps it is because he usually rode alone and didn't have the peer preasure that Every sacremento area rider has of seeing 100 superiorly dressed riders each weekend.
    I do agree with you that roadies do alot more talking.
    I still prefer the singletrack

  38. #38

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    Good job! Great thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by SofaKing
    Mountain Biking was born from Road Biking.

    Plus.......anyone want to TRY to hang with a professional Road Cyclist? trust me you would be looking at your lunch.

    one word- TOUGH
    How about hanging with a group of them (cat 1's, 2's 3's)......on your mountain bike? Thats part of the weekly routine around here

    Quote Originally Posted by bike_freak
    I cannot quite compare, but yesterday I did my first ride on slicks. It was one of those fund raiser events that are well organized with lots of people. It was 87km total. I put some 1" slicks on my bike which are about the same width as lots of road bikes. I wound down the u-turn on my fork and off I went.
    All I can say is although it was painfull and I tried to stay with all the roadies, it was soo good. I am now looking into getting a road bike cause I thought it was awesome. Although I hate having cars wizz past, and lots of people scream something out at you as they go past in their cars.
    Afterwards I put the mountain bike tires back on the bike and went for a quick ride, I felt so slow and also I felt like I was king of the world cause I was on a huge bike!
    I am just hopeing I don't turn into a roadie!! As long as I do wheelies and front manuals on my thin slicks I quess I can't be classed as a roadie
    Right on dude! Keep it up! I do all my road rides on my MTB. It's the only bike I have. I dont change tires either (I run Maxxis wormdrive 1.9 semislicks (inflated to about 80psi for road duty)). They're great tire that works well (and last long on pavement), and works pretty decent on most offroad surfaces.

    When I really started riding about 10 or so years ago I used to harp on/ criticize/ make fun of the roadies and claimed that I would never do what they do. Well after owning three road bikes and logging thousands of miles on them I can only look back and smile. Road cycling is fun, and I've got a lot of respect for anyone who's a member of the two wheeled family. I started out as a moutain biker and that's what I still am. I gave up the road bikes a while back but still hold on to my MTB roots religiously. But that doesn't mean that I've given up road riding! Nowadays I get out there and dice it up as best as I can with the Colnagos, TREK OCLV's, Look's, and other Dura Ace or Campy shod machines on my 100mm FS bike! Sometimes I get dropped when the speeds get high (and beleive me...they do) or the climbs get steep (which is a RARITY where I live), but that doesnt happen too often. I gotta say that its BETTER training than Ive EVER done on any road bike I've ever owned.

    It's so cool to be near the end fast ride that's 50 miles or more only to hear a rider on an unobtanium bike thats about 16.5lbs talking about how difficult the ride was and how he was dying at the end, and then I chime in saying "you wanna trade bikes?" I remember once I was at my local shop (where I know the owners quite well), and one of them was telling me about some road riding customer who came in one day talking about how he got dropped by some dude on an mountain bike. I felt pretty good about that.

    Seems like a lot of people on this thread arent used to riding in traffic and are terrified of it. I live in "sprawling suburbia" where it's mostly flat and we aren't blessed with an abundance of epic offroad riding spots. I must be desinsitized or something, because it doesnt bother me at all. I actually like riding in traffic (most of the time), especially when it's rush hour when a bike is faster than a car. I used to commute daily on busy roads and it never bothered me one bit. I also do a fair amount of "urban mountain biking" so I guess I like whatever "technical" terrain there might be along with the element of danger that the traffic brings. I've never had a bad incident (hope I didnt just jinx myself!)

    Rock on.





    Racing 'Round the Clock
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  39. #39
    wait a minute....
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr hoo
    Anagama, no? We have a guy in town who does anagama firings and I have grown to like them a lot.

    I like the road because I can spin for long periods of time. No shifting, no change in cadence, just circles making circles making me go. Some people talk about the "zen" of mtb, but that is a much more active "in the moment" than the road for me. And you can GO places. Like start in one town and end up in another, or loop through several towns.

    Oh, and field sprints. I can't climb worth a darn, and braking on downhills is always an adventure for someone my size, but give me a flat sprint and a few people around me and I WILL throw down!
    i got me a road bike a couple of years ago.it has about300 miles on it. i like the solitude,fresh air,and saftey of being in the woods.i was riding a 40 mile ride that i had ridden a few times,a truck pulling a bass boat(the kind with a trailer damn near as wide as the lane) came so close it brushed my leg hairs(no i dont shave them)and i havent been on it since. i have three kids who will need me around for a while so i'll stay in the woods and stay alive.

  40. #40
    fc
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    Road biking is dangerous for sure and we're not even talking about the racing. Can you say criterium??

    There was a big race last weekend in Merced and reports are there were many crashes!! Very good riders going down. There's a rumor that one guy alone caused three crashes eating up corners.

    Here's a ride report that just got posted on the alto velo forum. Scary and enlightening. He was just riding along then shabbam!!
    --------------------------------
    Field: 100+
    Distance: 48 miles
    Teammates: many
    Place: Merced Community Hospital

    I'd been looking forward to this race as I'd flatted out of Snelling on the
    first lap and there were some ten - twelve AVers in the group. Because
    there have already been several reports describing the race, I'll skip most
    the general stuff.

    The race was moving briskly on the first lap and as we neared the hard left
    prior to the broken pavement and rollers, Brian (I think) yelled for us to
    move to the front. I felt good so moved up quickly and proceeded to take a
    couple of pulls then block as Brian went off the front (again, I think...for
    reasons I'll explain, my memory is fuzzy). But he was immediately swarmed
    and the race was together as we made the hard left and hit the rollers. Not
    much of a climber, I had to work to stay near the front over the top. As we
    crossed the start/finish, I was pleased to be feeling good and told myself
    that I needed to stay among the top 10 - 15 so that I'd remain out of
    trouble and could help teammates as needed.

    As we moved west then headed south, I noticed that we were holding speeds of
    about 30mph. Granted it was a large group and there wasn't much wind to
    contend with, but that seemed like a pretty healthy pace. Anyway, this is
    where it becomes unclear. Next thing I know, I was lying in the road with
    my head in a pool of something wet (which I came to realize was obviously
    blood). A stranger with a gun was asking me for my name -- never a good
    sign. At the same time, he was managing a radio conversation in which he
    was asking for a helicopter. My imagination began floating back to my
    climbing bum days when I used to do rescue work in Yosemite and would
    routinely evacuate injured climbers in helicopters (which made for some
    exciting flights). But I digress...when the police officer realized that I
    was conscious -- apparently I'd been out for a couple of minutes -- he
    changed his order to an ambulance instead. All the while, I was trying to
    remember where I was, what happened, etc. I figured that I'd been in a
    race, but knew little else. Next thing I knew, a couple of guys were
    placing a neck collar on me and strapping me down to a backboard, while also
    barking out soothing one-liners...ala Mr. Rogers for the hearing
    impaired...in an attempt to keep me mellow but awake.

    The 40-minute ride into town was no party. Let me assure you that those
    rough roads are no more cushy on a backboard than they are on a bike. By
    the time I got to the hospital, my body was waking to what it had been
    through. During the next seven hours, my neck, back and pelvis were x-rayed
    (negative), my head was cat-scanned (negative), the gash on the back side of
    my head was stapled close, and the left side of my body was vigorously
    scrubbed (most of you know what that's like). During that time, my fiancée,
    Valerie, was driving down from Tahoe, quite rattled of course (she got the
    call while getting off a lift at Alpine Meadows).

    By late afternoon, images of the race began coming back to me. I remembered
    the portion that I described above. I also had a vague memory, or image, of
    a guy trying to plough his way through a small opening on my right. He
    caught my elbow and try as I might to lean against him for support, he had
    it hooked and that was the end of the image. Brian, who was at about 4
    o'clock to me when I crashed, said that he thought he saw something like a
    skewer get caught in my front wheel. Perhaps it was some combination of
    things. All I know was that it was very sudden and violent. My bike
    confirms that impression: while I haven't triaged it completely yet, it's a
    mess. The right-side fork was cracked and broke off in my hands when I
    fiddled with it. Some components will also need replacement, but the frame
    seems to be okay. My helmet of course exploded. Damned expensive sport.

    By the time Valerie got to the hospital, I was quite ready to get out of
    there. We left the hospital with instructions for Valerie to wake me every
    couple of hours to ensure that the concussion hadn't led to internal
    swelling. Interesting thing was, although I couldn't remember much from the
    crash, a part of my brain must have. Apparently I kept waking Valerie with
    bursts like "hold your line." At 5:00 am, I even insisted that she tell me
    how to say "raison d'etre" properly. Huh?!

    It's Tuesday morning now and I'm feeling better, though still sporting a
    headache and the left side of my body is tightening up, mostly due to road
    rash. You should know that Brian Buck, who was in the race, was really
    helpful to Valerie and me following the event. He and I think other AVers
    took care of details with my bike, car and generally checked up on me.
    Thanks, you guys, I really appreciate it. It's worth noting that a Merced
    volunteer at the race, Larry Mann, was also great. He drove my car from
    race start to his house, where he kept it for the night, communicated
    regularly with Valerie and came to see me in the hospital a couple of times.

    That's pretty much it. Sorry this dragged on for so long...I guess that I'm
    still remembering things. I only wish that I could be selective about what
    I do and don't remember.

    Jim
    ------------------------------------

  41. #41
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    Professionals

    Quote Originally Posted by SofaKing
    Mountain Biking was born from Road Biking.

    Plus.......anyone want to TRY to hang with a professional Road Cyclist? trust me you would be looking at your lunch.

    one word- TOUGH
    Of courses it's easy to hang with Tinker. :-)

  42. #42
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    Boats

    Reminds me of a trip on the Angeles Highway. I was biking on the pavement shoulder and among the traffic I heard rattling behind me everytime a vehicle hit the bumps. Sure enough it was a pickup pulling a boat trailer. At nearly the same time I heard a separate clang - clang - clang. Just missing me was a boat anchor. It buried itself into the uphill embankment. I was so pi**ed I pulled it out and sent it a 1000 feet down the mountain. Miles later on I saw the truck going back, but that stupid *** will never see it again.

  43. #43
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    Good job! This thread motivated me to get on the road...

    I am fed up with traffic and rode the road bike to work twice this week. It takes me 45 minutes to drive the 12 miles work and it took me only 53 minutes to ride the 15 miles of bike lanes to work! I had great days at work (biking really clears the mind) and looked forward to getting off work and riding home.

    I really enjoyed this thread--thanks!

    TD

  44. #44
    Ride what you want!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    Getting dropped - I think you really haven't experienced road riding until you've ridden in a pack of 50 or more. Not just any pack, but a pack that goes 5 mph faster than you could alone. Experiencing the draft, keeping the line, the ebbs and flows inside the pack, is totally addicting. And finally, getting dropped on a slight climb or start of a descent is enlightening. You're 20 feet behind the pack and the wind hits you. You fight to get back but your lungs are going to explode. 20 feet becomes 50, 200 very quickly. There's no catching them.
    francois
    Getting drop is one of the most motivating factors there is in cycling. In the pack you go fast, alone, you suck. If you were just a little bit stronger, you could have hung on. And the effort you put in to not get dropped is enormous. You leave it all out there on the road.

    Moutain bikers wait. Road riders don't unless it's specifically a no drop ride.

    george
    Trogs: Too Tough for Carbon Fiber

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by troy
    After reading all the replies I got a laugh thinking of how funny a road gathering would be. Sounds like there are some excellent roadies in our mist however it also sounds like there are a lot of cross-overs like myself. I'd love to see all of us trying to paceline without taking each other out.

    Baggies, visors and camelbaks and bunnyhopping pot holes.... Man, that would be a hillarious site rolling down the road.
    Body armor and full-face too, of course, seeing as how road riding is so dangerous...

  46. #46
    Ride what you want!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by saltamonte
    Some of the groups were even dressed alike (7 bikers drafting eachother in matching jerseys)
    Thats because they were all on the same team. Lots of bike teams all up and down california. Some of the benefits of being on a team include team deals on equipment. and reimbursement of race entry fees. Plus, you can always find a riding buddy. I tend to save my team kit wearing to race days. On today's ride, 7 of us went for a little ride, 4 were wearing the new team kit.

    george
    Trogs: Too Tough for Carbon Fiber

  47. #47
    Ride what you want!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by troy
    After reading all the replies I got a laugh thinking of how funny a road gathering would be.
    They happen all the time. They're called centuries, hundreds of riders show up to do epic rides and have a good time. Every weekend there is one happening somewhere.

    Actually www.roadbikereview.com has gatherings too, i've seen them listed on the old forum.

    george
    Last edited by george_da_trog; 03-20-2004 at 05:15 PM.
    Trogs: Too Tough for Carbon Fiber

  48. #48

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    Good job! I agree w/ lightspeedchick

    If there's anyone reading who switched from 100% mtb to 5% mtb with the rest road, could you please explain to me why? For the life of me, I can't understand why anyone would think road biking was more fun. It's fun...but so, so, so much LESS fun than mtb.
    I completely agree. I recently bought some 1" slicks for my Giant HT, and had a good time climbing in some ungodly high gear, but it is still not as fun as ringin off road. MTBing is so much more challengind. Nohthing can beat the feeling a cleaning a tight, fast section of tech singletrack.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Ride_16
    I completely agree. I recently bought some 1" slicks for my Giant HT, and had a good time climbing in some ungodly high gear, but it is still not as fun as ringin off road. MTBing is so much more challengind. Nohthing can beat the feeling a cleaning a tight, fast section of tech singletrack.
    Hell yeah. Any fool can drift skinny tires at the edge of traction. Especially in a pack.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedchick
    All my damn friends have turned into roadies, I had to get a roadie bike if I ever wanted to see them again. If there's anyone reading who switched from 100% mtb to 5% mtb with the rest road, could you please explain to me why? For the life of me, I can't understand why anyone would think road biking was more fun. It's fun...but so, so, so much LESS fun than mtb.
    It seems I've done that, and I'm getting a lot more riding in. It's simply because I can get out of class, hop on the SS with slicks and tear around town for 45 minutes, then be in my next class with time to spare. If I went mt biking, I'd probably be able to unload the bike before having to drive back, and even that might be pushing it.

    I can't wait until this summer....time to buy a road bike. Can't wait can't wait.

    Brian

  51. #51

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    Great Thread!! I am also a sworn fat tire rider, racing during the summer. I think road riding has helped me out. I have a double chainring, so climbing hills has improved my leg strength and and pedaling. Fast, curvey decents kind of make me nervous as well. Out whereI ride there is lots of wildlife and i think one of my biggest fears is flying down a road at 50 mph and having a deer run out into the road. It wouldn't be a pretty sight.

  52. #52
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    I'm a lucky boy.

    I spent my youth on the road. When I walked into Sugden & Lynch and saw the bikes, I was even more hooked on getting a so-called professional bike. The metal Campagnolo made their parts out of had this invisible layer that one could look into. I was totally in love. My bike cost $350 back in 1971. Sew ups. Ten speeds. 21 pounds. I rode the San Francisco penninsula. It was without a doubt the foundation of my life memories. Woodside, Kings Mountain road, Moody road, Page Mill, La Honda, and my favorite- Old La Honda road. Every day I hit the road. And being 110 pounds of muscle and bone, I climbed like noone. My last road ride, in 1994, in the bay area, was up La Honda road. It was the first time I was ever run off the road. It was an emotional experience. Here I had ridden for twenty years, and finally on my last ride I encountered hatred. When I started riding, there were virtually no cars. Here's something I'll bet you didn't know- Tom Ritchey and his friends started mountain biking on their road bikes. They were riding from Palo Alto to Santa Cruz on logging trails. I really miss it all. But I have my equivalent of road riding, on logging trails. It's not like single track, but a combination of mountain and road. Pretty fun. I say I won't get on the road again. But if I ever get the chance to ride where there are no cars, I would take it in an instant. One thing about riding trails- you never have to look back.

  53. #53
    It "is" about the bike..
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    Great Thread Indeed.

    As a mountain biker for many years, I've recently been on the quest for a road bike. I borrowed a friends extra bike and went for my first road ride earlier this year. It was good fun and what appeals to me most is being able to ride out of my driveway and just go for a ride. As opposed to mountain biking where I have to drive 30 minutes to the trailhead. As a new dad I don't get to ride as much as I like. So if I had a road bike I feel that I could get in a quick ride now and then and even participate in some group rides on the weekends.

    I've read this thread post by post from top to bottom. I share many of the same feelings and thoughts as others. I'm still on the fence about getting a road bike though. I've done all the research and have narrowed it down to about 3 bikes. But haven't got the nerve to do any test rides yet. I'm still afraid of the whole bike vs. car scenario. I've been riding bikes my entire life and am pretty confident in my bike handling skills. Crashed my BMX bike many times sans helmet as a kid. Endo'ed my MTB countless times, dropped off 7' rocks at Northstar, tumbled down rock gardens at Grouse Ridge. But still nothing is more scary to me than being taken out by a car. I do live close enough to some great country roads where there is minimal car traffic, but even then, it only takes one person whipping down a country road not paying attention and it could all be over......

    Dazed and Confused.

  54. #54

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    First year road rider here...

    As an obsessed mountainbiker, I've only owned a road bike for the last 2 months.

    Though the two are completely different, I definitely enjoy the road and being on a road bike.
    Maybe not as much as mountain biking, but it's such a different experience that it's hard to compare. They each have their pluses and minuses. For me, I love the way the road bike rides and how fast and smoothly it accelerates. I also love the feel of drop bars and STI shifters and having so many different places to put your hands. Also, standing on a steep uphill on a roadbike is a completely different experience than on a mtb.

    It also helps that I live in a rural area that is almost ideal for road riding, with many hilly, mostly deserted country roads. It's soooo nice to be able to just head out the front door for a 1-2 hour ride almost any time I want to (weather permitting).

    One thing about road riding that really gets to me though, is the fact that on a long, straight stretch of road, certain drivers will not cross the double yellow line to give you some space, even though there is no opposing traffic in sight! So even though they have plenty of room, they insist on flying past right next to you. Today this happened several times, and one of the drivers even turned out to be a friend of mine (I don't think she new it was me on the bike). I'm actually convinced that some people think it is illegal to put a wheel over the double yellow lines or something.

  55. #55
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    Road riding makes my MTBing funner

    by increasing my fitness level.
    I think if I tried to ride my mountain bike 7 days a week my bike and body would get pounded.
    The road bike makes it easier to get a specific work out, on the mountain bike I'm always hitting super high and super low heart rates.
    And the best/safest time to ride the road bike is early in the morning before traffic starts getting bad.

  56. #56
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    I started mountain biking years ago, and will always prefer singletrack, but I got into road riding a while back for the convenience and fitness. It didn't hurt that most of my riding friends were roadies. It's nice to go out for a 3 hour hammerfest and have it take only 3 hours. No drive time. I love to get in a groove on long road climbs. And they almost always end up with long fast twisty descents around here.

    Since it's cyclocross season, almost all of my road riding has been on my 'cross bike. Each fall when I switch from the road race bike to the cyclocross bike, I realize how much fun it is. The 'cross bike is almost as fast as the road bike so I can hang with my road buddies. But the big thing is when I see a little dirt shortcut, trail, or jump, I just take it. It's a new sense of freedom. My MTB feels so slow on the pavement, and my road bike needs to stay on the pavement, but the 'cross bike does both road and dirt pretty darn well. I got burned out on riding this summer for the first time ever. But when I put down the road bike and got out the 'cross bike, my passion was reinvigorated.

  57. #57
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    I've been riding road bikes a lot longer than

    mountain bikes, as for quite a bit of time there weren't any to ride anyway. Altho I guess I took my first bike out in the dirt as much as on the road now that I think about it. It's all good, think it's great if we can all participate in at least a couple different cycling disciplines.

    I don't like competing with the cars so much, but I try and create routes to minimize traffic and maximize views. I have a regular ride from my house that I like to do when I don't want to drive somewhere to mountain bike (most of the better rides require a drive unfortunately), it's long enough to get a good work out (42 miles) and has hills (2000' of climbing) and out of the way of cars much of the way, and some world class views. Gotta watch out for the tourists and commuters here and there, but mostly I only almost get killed once or twice a ride. I'd have to say my chances of buying it are a bit better on my road bike than my mountain bike; I've crashed real good on the mountain bike only in terms of broken body parts so far, though. Still waiting for that first great road crash.

    I rode the road bike today, and actually was thinking while riding today that I should take some photos and share it on rbr but after seeing this thread maybe I'll post 'em here. I just might get motivated to do so tomorrow, hopefully the weather is holding for capturing the killer views.

    Of course if my 5th coil weren't in for service/upgrade, I might have gone to Annadel today instead!
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  58. #58
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    Good job! Mountain biker road biking

    Great thread! I too picked up road riding about 2 years ago to get more time in the saddle so the mtn bike rides were more fun on the weekends. I use the road bike to commute generally on Tueday's and Thursdays, doing intervals on the trips home. Like others, my conditioning on the road bike during the week paid big heap dividends when I jumped on the mtn bike on the weekends. Mtn biking is my main love, but road riding is fun and is a good break from the dirt. Being able to jump on the bike right out the door, putting in long, fast miles, going from town to town, is fun.

    However, I was recently involved in an accident with a motorist while commuting to work on a dark morning. After the settlement I bought a sweet new Specialized Allez Comp Cro-Mo, but the main thing is I changed the way I ride the road, and I have noticed motorists do seem to notice me more now. Hope these tips might help you too:

    1. Add additional reflective items to your body like reflective ankle straps, jackets with 360 degree reflective material built in (Performance Iluminite, etc), flashing lights on your valve stems, etc. Become a Christmas tree on wheels! It's dorky, but it beats a car in your grill.

    2. Wear your head light on your helmet, not your bike. Always make a conscious effort to "look at" motorists so they see your light. Flash that light right in their face to get their attention. Move it side to side, anything, to make sure they see you.

    3. Add a flasher to the front of your bike. Most commuters have a flashing rear tail light, but I rarely see them on the front of bikes. This addition seems to have helped a lot, too.

    Have fun and be safe.

  59. #59
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    Salsa Road Bike

    I bought my Salsa roadie, partly because I thought they were kind of an old school retro mountain bike company (or at least started as one).

    Anyone else ride a road bike made by a mountain bike company? Yeti Road Project?

  60. #60
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    I'm definatley a moutain biker at heart and always will be, it's so much fun. I love riding on the road too. I had a road bike and it got stolen about 2 years ago. I just replaced it about a month ago. I think I've put around 150 miles on the new bike so far. I'm looking forward to putting a lot more miles on it.
    Several years ago me, my specialized s-works with Judy XC fork, and a BOB trailer rode from NJ to Whitefish Montana, 3200 miles, in 41 days. I spent hours pedaling through a heat wave that was following me with temps over 95 and topping out at 108. I remember spending a full day in the rock and roll hall of fame in Cleveland because I had a slightly pulled quadricep muscle and the head winds were killing me. I could go on forever about he people I met. I'll always remember that trip as one of the greatest times of my life. I did 17 centuries with my longest day at 163 miles, not bad being that I was on a 100 pound bike.
    I'm looking forward to doing it again. Next time I'm going to use my road bike with a max wieght of 50 pounds. I want to begin in Anchorage, Alaska and make my way back home to Hartford, CT. I've estimated that it should be around 6,000 or 7,000 miles and should take about 90 or so days. The whole trip will be on roads, but I still love off road more. There's just something about waking up every morning with nothing to do but ride down the road to the next town. And the feeling of realizing that you're a couple thousand or more miles from home and you got there on you bike is amazing. Yep, definatly looking forward to that one.
    I like to ride bikes.

  61. #61
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    ... and if we just ... My Too Cents

    But I regarlarly do about 25-50 miles on my road bike and I do century rides. When I'm ride, I avoid heavy traffic areas because of too many idiot drivers and ride mostly mountainous roads. It's amazing how fast you can go on your road bike.

    Got to agree with the fashion aspect, for some reason I'm more metrosexual on a road bike?

    I haven't crashed on my road bike yet. But when I do I'm sure it will be one of those "life altering" moments. As with mtn bike, if you crash its just part of the deal so you don't think twice about it.

    I ride both bikes about equaly and its the best!

  62. #62
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    an Mtbr Roadie Gathering!

    Quote Originally Posted by troy
    I got a laugh thinking of how funny a road gathering would be.
    I'd love to see all of us trying to paceline without taking each other out.
    Baggies, visors and camelbaks and bunnyhopping pot holes....
    Man, that would be a hillarious site rolling down the road.
    Boy that paints a purdy picture...Talk about a Motley Crue!
    The site of a cool breeze blowing thru our hairy legs!
    Hawgs, Full fingered gloves, & Full Armor!


    My roadie days were fun...I went nuts and bought a ti frame with Record parts.
    I did a Metric century that was some very sweet pain.

    But I always felt that the roadbike slowed me down.
    I got used to the smoothness and the speed on the road.
    When I switched back to the Mtb it seemed too rough and the handling felt too slow.
    It was like learning to Mtb all over again.

    Then there was the time a truck pulled off the road and onto the shoulder
    just to see if I'd flinch...heII yeah I flinched...almost flinched into a ditch.
    Then...Oh Then...there was the time a very nice driver offered me a drink.
    Too bad the full bottle of Coke® he whizzed at me was going 55 mph!
    Oh...and the ride I did close to Halloween...
    the one where I got egged right between the eyes...PURE JOY!

    Roads is Crazy
    A dirty book is rarely dusty

  63. #63

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    I never got "in" to road biking, although I do go on rides with those that do with my 1.95" semi-slick tires on my bullit
    yes, they eventually leave me behind but depending on where we are going I generally catch up at any lights (e.g. Arestradero in Palo Alto)

    I also have been commuting for a LOONG time on a mountain bike, currently 15 miles a day, but up to 35 miles a day where I used to live. To me it is a non-issue that my mountain bike is a couple-three mph slower on the flats than a comparable road bike.

    why? I urban jungle commute basically. there are no bike paths. I bomb sidewalks where convenient, hop obstacles, and everything in between. most road bikers I encounter on the commute do not pull away from me if at all or hardly ever pass me--- I'm not saying I'm all that quick it's just a 20mph pace on the flats easily puts you into the thick of things for bikes. Sure a roadbike would enhance that. But on my 30-35 minute commute, by my calculations 7 or 8 minutes of that is spent at stoplights. Big fricken deal, IMHO.

    So long story short, I see no reason to don the spandex butt-pads and neon jersey to shave 60-120 seconds off my commute. If anything I'd focus on increasing my cardio capacity.

    Swapping tires is annoying on the MTB for doing trails. Maybe I'll buy another set of wheels but then I'd have to buy brakes too. grrr.. guess I'll just keep swapping tires.

    Some of my 'roadie' friends that I continue to ride with on weekends are a little annoyed that I slow them up a bit on our weekend ~30 mile rides, but really it's not a big deal. They assumed that bike commuting on a MTB would cause me to want a road bike in short time.

    Not for me. I'd rather dust off my BMX freestyle bike and ride that in to the office, honestly.

  64. #64
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    Great thread indeed!

    I've been a roadie for the last few years but I'd really like to get back on the dirt more often. Searching for a new mtb as we speak.

    It's good to see that most everyone enjoys both. They are very different yet still involve two wheels, your own effort to move and the wind in your face.

    Cheers!
    -Ian

  65. #65
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    Great thread

    Like the OP, I find myself being more fashion concious on the roadie. It has even spilled over to the mountainbike. I now have clown socks to match my Graffix jersey.

    Crashing on the road bike will MESS YOU UP! I had a crash on the road bike a few years ago. I was trying to maintain momemtum on a short uphill section by standing and leaning over the bars. I wasn't looking up the road as it was a straight section and hit a 2X6. I was sliding along pavement before I knew what happened. It took me months to get back on the roadie because the crash just hurt so much more than anything that I had ever had on the mountainbike.

    Group riding can be VERY fun. Just be sure to let them know that you are new to riding in pacelines. Most roadies will give you a bit more room and are very willing to give some good advice on riding in groups.

    True rodies don't have bike skills. I was on a group ride with a bunch of rodies awhile back, and we came up to a spot where we had to drop off of a 4" curb. All of the roadies dismounted and walked it.

    I like to do both. It can only make you a stronger rider.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gakster
    Gak
    Good observations, but regarding point #1- it's a different kind of danger and depends on where you ride (quiet country road or busy multi-lane) and whether riding in a group or alone. On the road you gotta watch out for others (riders, cars, dogs, etc.) and the chances for a catastrophic incident are prob higher. But roadies going from road to mtn would see it the other way... roadies tend to have trouble on rougher terrain, rather than bombing over many tend to try to pick their way through, which leads slow-speed to falls. Accomplished roadies rarely fall on the road, but when crossing over falls are common to the newbie.

    #4- You have a typical reaction as someone going from fat tires to skinnies; it's not uncommon to be somewhat uncomfortable on 1" tires. Front suspension has been around awhile, just not well-accepted. Roadies are slow to change. Discs are coming though (already on cx and tandems), you'll see more.

    On #6, nail meet head. Too often group rides turn into dick-measuring contests, as the ride goes faster and faster and the group is blown apart. A nice group ride that stays and works together is usually more enjoyable than intervals for the leaders and dying to hang on for those in the back (Italian paceline).

    Damn right on #7.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by laotsu42
    ...i had a friend who raced road in high school who got run off the road on route 4 in the jemez while he was going around 30mph and that was not a pretty site, one entire side of his body was scab ...
    I lived in the Jemez for 15 years, and drove that road to and from Los Alamos every day. I will never understand how anyone in their right mind would choose to ride it. It might be a blast decending, but holy crap!- is it worth the full body scab?

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