Found a pot o' gold today.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Fart smeller
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    Found a pot o' gold today.

    I've been riding at New Hogan Lake for years, but today was the first on my SS. What a blast- lots of technical up/downhill grunty sections in the first half, then long stretches of bumpy/smooth singletrack for as far as the eyes can see. Well worth the drive if you live within 1-1/2 hours of Valley Springs. Trail review here: http://content.mtbr.com/pscTrails/Un...3_4518crx.aspx

    The IMBA trail crew is gonna be there next weekend. Check it out- help us dig, and get a couple of good rides in.

    Here's some pics:

    1) Corey and one of his puppers, not Mocha, but the other one.

    2) Jim (imjps) is out there somewhere.

    3) It shore ain't Northstar, is it?

    4) Imjps in a corner. Lookit them teef!

    5) Oh, and the pot of gold? I stumbled on these (no pun intended) in Lodi after the ride- I'll bet they're the last 11 Bigfoots in all of Cali. Mmmmmmm. *hic* Don't be operating heavy machinery (read: farm equipment) after a couple of these.

    fp
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    Last edited by Finch Platte; 11-07-2004 at 06:25 PM. Reason: Make that the last TEN.
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  2. #2

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    That brew looks interesting!!

    Could you describe it please?


  3. #3
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    Well...

    Quote Originally Posted by Panacea
    Could you describe it please?

    I've had acouple but the flovar canbebes discribe as wil;31607806706 m m,.,jjjjjjjj
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    "If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention."

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  4. #4

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    sounds good!


  5. #5
    TR
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    Sounds great.
    Gotta get me some of those.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Panacea
    Could you describe it please?

    In a nutshell? Scrapings from a combat boot (not necessarily a bad thing), will knock you on your ass.

    Edit: On the East Coast, an equivalent is Dogfish Head's Immort Ale. It's a taste I haven't acquired.
    Last edited by Drewdane; 11-08-2004 at 07:40 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panacea
    Could you describe it please?

    An acquired taste (hehheh), and, as Drewdane said, they will definitely put one on one's ass if you try to drink it like regular beer (made more for sippin' in front of a fireplace on a cold winter's evening).....Man, I haven't had/seen Bigfoots in years !!!

  8. #8
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    How's this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Panacea
    Could you describe it please?

    Basic Characteristics of This Beer:

    Starting with the pour, you already know that this is no ordinary beer. The instant the heavy liquid transfers from the bottle to a glass, the earthy, spicy aroma of hops fills the air with smells of fruit, grain, alcohol, and other scents. The body of the beer is burnt orange/red in color and very full, making it pour a little more slowly than normal brew.

    When you taste this beer, your palate is greeted with an explosion of hop flavor as the Cascade hops coat your taste buds with a citrus and plum flavor that lasts and lasts long after the last sip. There is some caramel malt taste mixed in, but the taste of hops is overwhelming, leading to a finish that is bitter, hoppy, and alcoholic.

    Sierra Nevada brews this product using two- row pale malt, caramel malt, and dextrin malt; Cascade, Centennial, and Chinook hops; and ale yeast. The final product has an alcohol content of 9.6 percent by volume and there are 295 calories and 24.6 grams of carbohydrates in a 12 oz. serving.


    Barley wine is ale to be savored

    Doug Blackburn
    Albany Times Union
    Apr. 9, 2004 12:00 AM

    Many people who enjoy beer are nonetheless puzzled by barley wine.

    That's understandable. The name alone is enough to throw you off track.

    But make no mistake about it. Barley wine is an ale, a proud member of the beer family that is neither plain nor simple.

    So what is a barley wine? It is a strong and complex ale with a rich history, an elegant beverage that opens up more like a wine than a beer.

    It is meant to be sipped and savored, not guzzled. If you are not too familiar with barley wine, trust me: It is a style of beer worth getting to know.

    In short, barley wines are the opposite of light and low-carb beers.

    Most beer is best when consumed as soon as possible after it's made.

    Not barley wine. This is a beer that ages. A good barley wine will actually improve over time. The hard part is not opening the bottle once you have it in your house.

    Perhaps the best way to describe barley wines is to say they are a cross between a port and an ale. They are less sweet than typical ports, but decidedly malty with hints of fruit.

    When served at a restaurant or pub, barley wines are traditionally poured into a brandy snifter. This helps them breathe and release their complex flavors. It also limits the quantity you're getting, which is a smart thing considering some barley wines are as potent as the strongest wines.

    I get a kick out of the names breweries bestow upon their barley wines: Big Foot, Chaotic Chemistry, Druid Fluid, Grim Reaper, Monster, Old Foghorn. And, breweries being breweries, most have taken grammatical license and condensed barley wine into one word on their labels.

    Barley wines are arguably the most gourmet of microbrews. As a result, they have a cult-like following among beer geeks like me (yes, I am a beer geek).

    Brewers love to make barley wines because it lets them strut their stuff. Most of the local brew pubs feature a barley wine from time to time, usually during the winter months. They do this even though it's a tough sell.

    Albany, N.Y.-area brewmasters Drew Schmidt and Peter Martin say they have been reluctant to offer barley wines because they don't move as well as more common beers. But both brewers have some barley wine stored away for special occasions. It's the type of beer they are likely to take to a festival to showcase their talents.

    Barley wines trace their roots to England during the Middle Ages. Then it was simply called ale. Or strong ale. The name developed in Great Britain in the early 1900s when Bass Brewing Co. named its strongest ale barley wine because its alcohol content was closer to wine than beer.

    Anchor Brewing Co. in San Francisco was the first brewery in this country to offer a barley wine. This was in 1975. Anchor, one of the pioneers in America's craft brewing revolution, continues to turn out Old Foghorn barley wine every year.

    It comes in charming, petite 7-ounce bottles, which in truth is all the barley wine you need in one sitting.

    Today, at least 50 microbreweries and brew pubs regularly produce a barley wine. One of my favorites is from California, Sierra Nevada's Bigfoot Barleywine. It's also among the least expensive barley wines out there. One Albany area beverage store sells 12-ounce bottles of Bigfoot for $2.15 (compared to $2.99 for 7 ounces of Old Foghorn).

    Bigfoot weighs in at 9.6 percent alcohol and, like most barley wines, is on the cloudy side when poured into a snifter. Its color is reddish-brown and it has the perfect balance of intense maltiness and fruity notes along with discernible hops. It's a wonderful after-dinner sipping beer.

    Barley wines pair best with desserts, particularly rich chocolate cakes. They also hold up well with strong cheeses, even blue cheeses. I've been known to enjoy them with less gourmet foods. In fact, I've found that a yummy barley wine goes great with Nacho Cheese Doritos.

    Don't be intimidated by barley wines. They may be an acquired taste, but once you are familiar with them you'll want to have a few bottles on hand.

    fp note: It's the best, Jerry. The best.

    Pic of me (yesterday) by Corey.
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    "If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention."

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  9. #9
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    Yep, still a few cases of Bigfoot littered around the state. I stumbled on a store in San Jose that buys in tons of it at the beginning of the season. They still have some, or did last week when I checked. It is definitely worth picking up when you spot it. Next batch won't be around till February or so.

  10. #10
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    We coulda had BigFoot afterwards?

    [QUOTE=Finch Platte]
    fp note: It's the best, Jerry. The best.
    QUOTE]

    I can't believe I missed it !

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