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  1. #1
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    Bike Photography

    Due to a recent injury I may have to give up biking, but I am still passionate about the sport and want to stay in the riding scene.

    I think bike photography would be the best way for me to enjoy the bike culture without being able to ride.

    I'm wondering if anyone could suggest some good bike photograpy specific websites, blogs, magazines, etc. that would help with my research on what to buy and how to get started.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I always enjoyed photography-on-the.net . Great group of people.

    Sorry about your bad luck, but I like your outlook. Welcome to another (even more) expensive hobby! HAHA

  3. #3
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    ^^ +1.. great site and awesome, helpful community. Just so you know you will need a DSLR with a "speed" setting and fast focusing lenses (i.e. expensive). Some of the items can be compromised with lower quality lenses but If you have the budget go for the top line stuff. IS (Image Stabilization) will be a key factor also in what you purchase. I am a Canon guy and love my 20D, if possible look for a used (but not abused) body in the 40D/50D range and then a good 70-200mm L series lens.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash
    ^^ +1.. great site and awesome, helpful community. Just so you know you will need a DSLR with a "speed" setting and fast focusing lenses (i.e. expensive). Some of the items can be compromised with lower quality lenses but If you have the budget go for the top line stuff. IS (Image Stabilization) will be a key factor also in what you purchase. I am a Canon guy and love my 20D, if possible look for a used (but not abused) body in the 40D/50D range and then a good 70-200mm L series lens.
    I'm going to have to disagree with you on having to have the high end camera . it helps , but it is not necessary. I have gotten some of my Best photo's with a Cheap Point and Shoot!

    Taken with a P&S













    Granted, I can't do 1/2 what My DSLR can do. but it is not a requirement.

    things like this take the bigger camera





    most importantly have fun its a blast!
    I'm Better known as Splat

  5. #5
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    IS or image stabilization is not really needed for action photography, I haven't used it for while. When I first started I thought otherwise but now I don't even own an IS lens. Relatively speaking, in the world of photography IS is a fairly new technology, people have been taking great pics for longer than it has been around. Just remember IS is not going to freeze the action, only stop camera shake. IS is handy at times, don't get me wrong but for fast moving targets I never really find it a necessity.

    For me its all about shutter speeds and aperture I find that the 70-200 F2.8 is the perfect lens for sports photography. You can get really fast shutter speeds at F2.8.

    If you do find yourself wanting to get into photography, you will quickly learn the shutter bugs are like any other hobbyist, the majority of them love to talk about their hobby, will joyfully speak in terms that you don't understand, always willing to spread the knowledge, critique your work, answer your questions with long, informative and friendly answers, and are all around great people.

    POTN forums is a great place to start

  6. #6
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    CircusJunk nailed it, it's not about the equipment, but the operator of said product Yes, you can't get that depth of field or lack there of on most P&S and being able to select shutter speeds isn't always there, but if you know what you're doing you'll have a good chance of producing some decent images AND the biggest plus of a P&S is that you'll most likely carry it with you wherever whereas lugging around a heavy DSLR isn't as much fun.

    Just to illustrate the big difference between a P&S and a "pro" DSLR here are 2 shots of my new Banshee Paradox. You can easily see how I was able to select my aperture and thereby throw the background clean out of focus compared to the P&S which has everything in focus, BUT still it's not a bad shot.

    DSLR used is a Nikon D70s with an 80-200 f/2.8 D lens, P&S is a Panasonic LS-70. I always say, compromise on the body and get the best and fastest lens you can afford - thats 80-200 is over 15 years old and still going, all be it a bit slow in the focus dept.


    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  7. #7
    the test dummy
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    i dont have a fancy camera but i have gotten some cool shots with my point and shoot
    this is my favorite of them all
    From my pics

    wow i have 2,700 posts im logging off for a while now
    Quote Originally Posted by craftworks750
    Riding a mtb is like a reset button, 10 mins in and there is nothing else in the world that matters.
    my bikes
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  8. #8
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    Read as much as you can and teach yourself as much as you can. Try and hook up with some people who can critique your work. Workshops are awesome for this.

    Composition is critical. Technical knowledge and control will help you make the most of your vision and for this you do need a DSLR. gregnash gives some good advice any mid range body will do. Canon or Nikon you can't really go wrong. It is worth it to spend the money on good glass too. The Nikon D3100 looks to be a sweet new release should set you right for awhile. Try shopping legit second hand dealers like KEH or B and H for glass.

    A cheap point and shoot for the most part isn't going to cut it. I've taken some great shots with some PS and even and iphone but for the most part they are going to limit you more than anything.

  9. #9
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    The hardest part about biking photography is going to be having a unique style and vision. Like I said composition is critical you want to capture an image that is compelling and tells a story. check Anne Keller out for some really great work.

    http://www.annekellerphotography.com/

    She's got it on lock down.

  10. #10
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    Your budget?

    You need to decide how much you have to spend and then buy what you can afford. If you have to start with a non-DSLR then do so. But start with one that has some manual controls, e.g. the Canon G series. Next you could start with a basic Canon or Nikon DSLR and one lens which covers wide angle to very short telephoto. Most "kit" lenses cover this range. You do not need much over 100 mm because you need to get close to the action. Long telephotos can make you lazy and unimaginative. I shoot mostly way under 100 mm (on FF camera). Next I would suggest a flash that can do high speed sync, which will allow you to use fast shutter speeds. And use the flash for "fill" for practically every shot, especially in bright sunlight.

    If you get into it more then begin upgrading the body and lenses as you can afford to. Stick with Canon or Nikon because you can grow into them. Technique is more important than the camera. Since you no longer have to pay for film just start shooting. And remember location, location, location (your location, the sun's location, and the rider's location).

    And don't totally give up riding just yet. Things change
    Last edited by Wherewolf; 09-03-2010 at 08:26 PM.

  11. #11
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    Crop!

    Crop a lot off the top of the top photo. Then I think both would be equally good. A good in-focus background can also add to a photo. Particularly if it puts the subject in context.

    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx


  12. #12
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    There is a guy who shoots alot of local races here in Texas @ bobcat13photography. Never actually spoken with him but at times it almost seems as if he uses the spray and pray method of shot taking (am sure there is a TON of skill in those shots though!). But that may be an avenue you can explore to help pay for your new hobby by hooking up with a local promoter...

  13. #13
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    If you want to get into action photography, don't mess around with a point and shoot camera. I love my P&S, but I am very aware of its limitations.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  14. #14
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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    if I have the right person he's a good guy; met and rode with him at Lake Bryan a few weekends ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by ridelikeafatkid
    There is a guy who shoots alot of local races here in Texas @ bobcat13photography. Never actually spoken with him but at times it almost seems as if he uses the spray and pray method of shot taking (am sure there is a TON of skill in those shots though!). But that may be an avenue you can explore to help pay for your new hobby by hooking up with a local promoter...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan0930
    ........... check Anne Keller out for some really great work........

    http://www.annekellerphotography.com/

    .........She's got it on lock down.
    Does she ever. So good
    Here's my crummy, slow-going blog The Slow Spoke if you're interested.

  16. #16
    Rolling
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    Until this thread, I thought bikes automatically came with cameras....kinda like phones.

  17. #17
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    Yes, very expensive hobby. DSLR is the only way to go. Look for used equipment. I bought my first canon 40D with 2 lenses and tons of accessories for half the price. Course now I have more money in a 70-200 f2.8 lens than I do in everything else. Nice outlook on how to enjoy the sport!

  18. #18
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    40D w/ 17-85


  19. #19
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    It is all about vision

    (By the way, a few moment spent on the Beginners Forum will be illuminating. The language is all the same. Just change bike for camera.)

    The most modest cameras can do wonders if you have vision. I've known photographers who have great gear and no vision. I've known photographers who have remarkably poor skills but great vision. Guess who makes the best images?

    I have my misgivings about "teaching" photography. Most guys I know either have it from the beginning or they don't. Some are into the equipment or have avery limited vision and after that is done, then what?

    If you have something to say, go out and make it in an image with any camera you can get your hands on. When you are done see if it says what you wanted. If it didn't then you have to figure out how to get there. Frankly most images captured warrant very little attention. Any pro will tell you that. What you also will hear is that it usually has little to do with expensive gear. It has mostly to do with understanding what you see and that takes no equipment at all. What you will do for the next 10 years is learn that there is a "visual language" which everyone seems to understand but very few know how to speak. Everyone likes wine but few know how to make it or even know a good one when they drink it. To a main point, it doesn't stop people from having another glass. Actually, just because we have access to enormous amounts of info on wine, wine making and such, we are not wine afficienados, we are just consumers.

    Think of camera marketing in those terms. They love to sell people that stuff.

    Within the ubiquitous automated cameras available you will find that your problem with imaging is probably not the camera. Just like with cool mtb rigs, there are a lot of cool camera rigs gathering dust in the garage. Just like with a first bike I recommend a very modest, low-cost start to get you going. It ends up being a throwaway after a year or so but then you know something about what you want to do and it has resale value. This advice, so very, very often, falls on deaf ears. You will listen to what you want to hear.

    Look around on this site to see an enormous volume of empty imaging. Me coming down a ga-narly bit of rock, me in front of scenic view, bike against sofa, me schredding, big air, cheesecake, me on podium. These are all done to death and rarely done well. That said there is no reason at all that they need to be done well; the act is fun enough. I get that. I mean how many of us aren't really good riders but enjoy it anyway.

    Which brings me to expensive toys. Who of us really rides up to the quality of a $1500 bike. I mean, really. I've got some nice bikes but they are far beyond my capability and I'm a pretty decent rider. We have them because we love them, they make us comfortable, they make up for our lack of skills, we can talk about them. All fair. Yet in the end we find our own limits soon enough. Time for burgers and beers with the buds.

    But, you say, what t if I want to do big blow-ups or special effects. We, first go back to "Frankly most images captured warrant very little attention. Any pro will tell you that. What you also will hear is that it usually has little to do with expensive gear." One really has to consider how an image will be used. It is a rare image I want to see big. You have to know what you are doing FIRST. You have to know how the image will be seen.

    Get a camera, any camera. Go take pictures and make decisions. Learn from what you do. Go take some more. Repeat. When you actually need more gear it will be because you have come to understand what you are seeing and how to capture it. But before that, before anything, you have to know what it is you want to see and how you want to show it. Absent that you are just twiddling knobs and switches like the infinite number of monkeys with an infinite humber of typewriters; ultimately one will create the great American novel. Expensive knobs don't help.

    Good luck.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweaty yeti
    POTN forums is a great place to start

    True!

  21. #21
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    I pay for all my bike and photo hobby stuff doing bike racing photography.

    Here are my friends from the last few races. I annoyingly have to watermark/protect the rest of them.















  22. #22
    Bike Jewelry Maker
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    Now THIS is some fantastic advice...nicely put.

    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    (By the way, a few moment spent on the Beginners Forum will be illuminating. The language is all the same. Just change bike for camera.)

    The most modest cameras can do wonders if you have vision. I've known photographers who have great gear and no vision. I've known photographers who have remarkably poor skills but great vision. Guess who makes the best images?

    I have my misgivings about "teaching" photography. Most guys I know either have it from the beginning or they don't. Some are into the equipment or have avery limited vision and after that is done, then what?

    If you have something to say, go out and make it in an image with any camera you can get your hands on. When you are done see if it says what you wanted. If it didn't then you have to figure out how to get there. Frankly most images captured warrant very little attention. Any pro will tell you that. What you also will hear is that it usually has little to do with expensive gear. It has mostly to do with understanding what you see and that takes no equipment at all. What you will do for the next 10 years is learn that there is a "visual language" which everyone seems to understand but very few know how to speak. Everyone likes wine but few know how to make it or even know a good one when they drink it. To a main point, it doesn't stop people from having another glass. Actually, just because we have access to enormous amounts of info on wine, wine making and such, we are not wine afficienados, we are just consumers.

    Think of camera marketing in those terms. They love to sell people that stuff.

    Within the ubiquitous automated cameras available you will find that your problem with imaging is probably not the camera. Just like with cool mtb rigs, there are a lot of cool camera rigs gathering dust in the garage. Just like with a first bike I recommend a very modest, low-cost start to get you going. It ends up being a throwaway after a year or so but then you know something about what you want to do and it has resale value. This advice, so very, very often, falls on deaf ears. You will listen to what you want to hear.

    Look around on this site to see an enormous volume of empty imaging. Me coming down a ga-narly bit of rock, me in front of scenic view, bike against sofa, me schredding, big air, cheesecake, me on podium. These are all done to death and rarely done well. That said there is no reason at all that they need to be done well; the act is fun enough. I get that. I mean how many of us aren't really good riders but enjoy it anyway.

    Which brings me to expensive toys. Who of us really rides up to the quality of a $1500 bike. I mean, really. I've got some nice bikes but they are far beyond my capability and I'm a pretty decent rider. We have them because we love them, they make us comfortable, they make up for our lack of skills, we can talk about them. All fair. Yet in the end we find our own limits soon enough. Time for burgers and beers with the buds.

    But, you say, what t if I want to do big blow-ups or special effects. We, first go back to "Frankly most images captured warrant very little attention. Any pro will tell you that. What you also will hear is that it usually has little to do with expensive gear." One really has to consider how an image will be used. It is a rare image I want to see big. You have to know what you are doing FIRST. You have to know how the image will be seen.

    Get a camera, any camera. Go take pictures and make decisions. Learn from what you do. Go take some more. Repeat. When you actually need more gear it will be because you have come to understand what you are seeing and how to capture it. But before that, before anything, you have to know what it is you want to see and how you want to show it. Absent that you are just twiddling knobs and switches like the infinite number of monkeys with an infinite humber of typewriters; ultimately one will create the great American novel. Expensive knobs don't help.

    Good luck.

  23. #23
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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    hmm the last set of images posted to this thread....there's just something wrong--at least to me--when the pic made to be so "eye-popping" that is almost 3D like in quality--almost looks as someone has glued separate images onto the out of focus backgrounds. Usually I enjoy "pro" looking phots, but IMO there is such a thing as over doing it to the point it looks unnatural.

  24. #24
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    Its a balancing act between getting great looking shots and getting every racer in focus looking good. Once a class has started coming past me I basically can't take 3 seconds to look at the shot and adjust my settings, so there are compromises. Also as the sun moves through the woods and clouds come and go I would need to change too.
    Sometimes I get breaks between riders but I can't count on them.
    It's also a struggle getting these same racers to buy their pictures over and over again, I have to make each race look special.
    Bikers look down and create shadows on their faces. People like to be able to clearly see that it is them so there is a lot of unnatural lighting, which gives it that weird 3D look. Because really you shouldn't be able to make out the person's face like that.
    People also really identify with their bikes so the bikes have to come out well too.
    It's also not easy making cross country racing look exciting, it's really just a bunch of dudes peddling around looking frustrated.

  25. #25
    It's about showing up.
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    Yet these serve a very specific purpose

    Quote Originally Posted by ArmySlowRdr
    hmm the last set of images posted to this thread....there's just something wrong--at least to me--when the pic made to be so "eye-popping" that is almost 3D like in quality--almost looks as someone has glued separate images onto the out of focus backgrounds. Usually I enjoy "pro" looking phots, but IMO there is such a thing as over doing it to the point it looks unnatural.
    These images serve, I might say even pander to (though I mean no disrespect), a client who must be driven to purchase "this is me racing" in a faux-heroic pose. This is commercial imaging serving a market which has a different visual value system. They are sharp, exposed with style, nicely timed by a hand practiced at this particular slice.

    Vision and a sense of how the image will be seen.

    What Army says though is a function of practiced eye who can see the technique more than the moment. The image lacks life but is more like a butterfly on a pin; beautiful but static.

  26. #26
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    I've been really trying to find an opportunity to be more experimental with bike racing pictures. I can't risk blowing a shot though, I have since attracted 2-4 other photographers out at the races now that they have figured out that you can make money at this.

    I often try to experiment on the pro class when they have 4 laps, they almost never buy their pictures and they certainly don't buy 4 so I can at least try some stuff. But usually that's at about hour 10 of me sitting alone, in the woods, too often in the rain so I have basically no drive to do anything at that point.

    Anyway another pic, my friend Nick who is always photogenic

  27. #27
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    Here you see more life

    as subject is more confident of the result he is less focused on you or impressing you. The subject, your friend, is left to be more involved in the moment and the continuity of events give it life. You are not so concerned with selling him anything. You have greater freedom and familiar anticipation. The light from the side is unnatural but for your market it makes them feel special. I think it is a great approach. It is, I am sure you agree, a very narrow, very purposed, view of mtb.

    I think it only fair to share a few images of mine. These are with a point and shoot. My purposes going in are much broader: I want one memorable shot of each of my racers. I know that there are limitations due to the particular palette and focus limits of the camera but portability while I am trying to run a racing team takes precedence and I am happy with the moment, most of all.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike Photography-dsc_2542.jpg  

    Bike Photography-east-garr-ahs-1662.jpg  

    Bike Photography-east-garrahs1373.jpg  

    Bike Photography-tracy0630.jpg  

    Bike Photography-ebtceb1.jpg  

    Bike Photography-east-garrahs1432.jpg  


  28. #28
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    Passing a small lake on a tour i stumbled on this (probably) stolen and thrown away bicycle.


    And the bike i was riding that day

  29. #29
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    Could you have done these shots

    with a point and shoot?

  30. #30
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    Cheapass Nikon D40 with a 50mm lens.
    But i am looking for something smaller that fits in my backpocket. Canon G11 perhaps.

  31. #31
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    Pay attention and move around

    I did not get the impression you planned on being a pro, which would be difficult. Therefore, you have the freedom to move about, and based on your knowledge of mountain biking you can anticipate where the best shots will be. Shooting people just riding along all day would be incredibly boring. If you post photos be sure to use a professional looking site without a lot of ads and crap.






  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Circusjunk

    things like this take the bigger camera

    Ummm...no.


  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by charvey9
    Due to a recent injury I may have to give up biking, but I am still passionate about the sport and want to stay in the riding scene.

    I think bike photography would be the best way for me to enjoy the bike culture without being able to ride.

    I'm wondering if anyone could suggest some good bike photograpy specific websites, blogs, magazines, etc. that would help with my research on what to buy and how to get started.

    Thanks.
    If you don't have this already, this book is a great "practical" starting point for someone just getting into photography. Brian Petereson: Understanding Exposure.

    http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-.../dp/0817463003

    Photography is an interesting hobby because as someone else said, you either "have it" or you don't in terms of creating an image. Nice gear and "great glass" definately help you make great images, but they are only tools to enhance what your creative mind can make. A lot of people spend a lot of time figuring out all the functions on newer DSLRs when they would be better served learning about composition, light, and exposure.

    Just like a lot of people here like to train on rigid singlespeeds to hone their pure skills, a lot of photographers suggest starting out shooting full manual until you understand what the camera is doing and why. Another good learning tool is to find an image in a book, magazine, or on the web and then try and reproduce it. Take notes. At first everything is very "deliberate" but just like mountain biking, as you progress things become second nature.

    IMHO, FWIW, I would suggest: 1) getting the book I linked to above, 2) a decent entry level DLSR (BTW, there are more options other than Canon and Nikon --and don't buy into the megapixel/HD marketting hype); and 3) a quality tripod. From there go to races and takes lots of pictures. But always start with an idea of want you want to do and say--you need to know what you intend to paint before you start throwing paint on the canvas. Using the auto exposure on the camera to take a million pictures with the continuous shooting function will get you nothing but a lot of crappy or, at best, average images.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtluke
    I pay for all my bike and photo hobby stuff doing bike racing photography.

    Here are my friends from the last few races. I annoyingly have to watermark/protect the rest of them.














    I really like these, some amazing shots

  35. #35
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    Brilliant!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf
    Pay attention and move around [/IMG]

    Huge!

  36. #36
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    Anyone can take a picture....the ones that are memorable are few and far between. In my opinion, what sets great images apart
    is composition. (read; great eye) It's not science.. its aperture, shutter speed, and timing.

    Basic light manipulation. No amount of money (or equipment) can make up for poor composition. Post processing is not a safety net,
    but many people use it as a band-aid for mistakes of all kinds. A camera is nothing more than a brush in an artists hand. So yes, it does matter
    who picks up the brush. I just realized someone already said the same thing above...
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf

    What a great shot!

  38. #38
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    I've always been interested in photography and recently decided to bring my slr to the trail to fool around:

    Matt:


    Matt;


    Me:


    My Ride:


    And of course some branding :

  39. #39
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    Thanks for the tips and advice. Some great pictures in this post too!

    I'm not a complete beginner to photography, about 12 years ago I dropped my bike addiction for photography and stuck with it through college. However, once I graduated and joined the real world I had not had much time for any hobbies until recently. I just picked up biking again this year and have fell pretty hardcore into the DH/FR scene, but it has been about 6 years since I've attempted to take a quality photo. I've been completely out of the loop on photography tech during that time period. I've always been a Canon guy and still have my Elan 7E 35mm body and some decent glass, so it makes sense to look for a decent Canon body to utilize the lenses. I appreciate those who posted suggestions on equipment and provided some research resources.

    As my first post indicated, I recently took a hard crash and fractured two vertabrae. Upon hearing the news, I natuarally expected the worse. Fortuneately, things are not as bad as I had feared and the Doc says I should make a full recovery in about 8-10 weeks.

    However, as someone stated above, it seems that bikes and cameras should go together. I'm definately going to look forward to combining my two hobbies to create some great bike photography once I'm healthy!

    Thanks again for sharing.

  40. #40
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    Take a class, I use a old five megapixel camera, I make up for th lack of equipment by understanding lighting and what not, photography class really helped and i would love to take another one for the digital era. Edit: what prevents you from riding? I figure since my father had to recover from a stroke and learn how to read, write, and walk again at 65 anyone can do anything they put their mind to.


    Bike Photography-endofaprilride-0039.jpg

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik
    Ummm...no.


    How do you take this type of picture? I would love to be able to do that.

    Two roads diverged in a yellow wood and I,
    I took the road less traveled by and
    It has made all the difference. R Frost

  42. #42
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    a lot can be done with post processing. lighting also helps create a nice effect.






  43. #43
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    Instead of doing FR/DH, get a 'cross bike!! You don't have to give up anything and stay in the cycling world. It may open you to new things.

  44. #44
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    I think I'm going to go with the Canon T1i. I like to buy new, since I've had bad experiences with used electronics and cameras and Best Buy has 3 years no interest right now. It should last me a long time.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by charvey9
    I think I'm going to go with the Canon T1i. I like to buy new, since I've had bad experiences with used electronics and cameras and Best Buy has 3 years no interest right now. It should last me a long time.
    just curious, why not go with the T2i?


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    I considered the T2i, but didn't think it was neccessary to start with and wanted to stay on budget of around $1,000. Instead of spending everything on the camera kit I also bought an external flash, 16gb card, and an extra battery.

  47. #47
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    Isn't the T2i down to about $725 new? As far as what little I've read, the T2i seemed highest rated for the $, performance & class. Def. not knocking your acquisition.


  48. #48
    Y no grease?ლ(ಠ益ಠლ
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    I'd check out the new 60D pretty nice flipout screen n stuff
    Climbing ain't easy
    when you're fat and greasy
    - 2 Bigsteve

  49. #49
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    FWIW, I've been shooting with the T1i for a little over a year, and I love the camera. Nothing wrong with the T2i either, though. If the T1i gives you a budget for another lens, I'd say gopherit.

  50. #50
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    I got the T1i kit for $699, the T2i was $909.

  51. #51
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    I like photography in general, a couple of my bike I've taken.




    Really was into it much more earlier this year. Kind of been bored with it lately. Bored with everything really.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by _alain_
    Passing a small lake on a tour i stumbled on this (probably) stolen and thrown away bicycle.
    This is a very nice pix sir. May I ask what settings is used? B&W? Or that's the real color? Any post processing done?

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim-H
    I like photography in general, a couple of my bike I've taken.




    Really was into it much more earlier this year. Kind of been bored with it lately. Bored with everything really.
    best picture's posted, good lighting, angles, colors.

  54. #54
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    Here is a project for you!!!!

    I have an idea for you, Bruce Brown is a one of a kind Photographer/Movie maker, how about a movie with your insight into mountian biking about week end rides, like Bruce's On Any Sunday movies about motorcycles, here is a clip from the first On Any Sunday, if this don't inspire you nothing will, Good Luck,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyjtpB6AFuI

  55. #55
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    Some shots from the weekend

    Devils Den State Park, Arkansas.

    Bike Photography-devils-den-002.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-016.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-022.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-125.jpg
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

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    A few more from the same ride..

    I suspect Autumn will be a lot of fun this year...
    Bike Photography-devils-den-218.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-131.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-132.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-133.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-136.jpg
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

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    Arkansas fun..

    A fun but slick creek crossing..
    Bike Photography-devils-den-264.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-265.jpg

    Bike Photography-devils-den-266.jpg

    All those pics are taken with an entry level DSLR Rebel XT... freehand, manual mode, cheap kit lens, and have no post processing.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  58. #58
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    T2i's are great camera's for the money, I work for ABC and we use this camera all the time for commercials, promos, etc... since it can shoot 1080p video. Excellent camera for the money, I even bought one for my own personal use. You can get a T2i with the basic kit lens for $800...

    Oh and POTN is a great forum to start learning.
    Too many bikes, just enough time.

  59. #59
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    Moose!

    Alright already. You are practicing panning. Now practice editing.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    Alright already. You are practicing panning. Now practice editing.
    I currently have no editing software...beyond simple things
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  61. #61
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    http://www.gimp.org/

    Great, free editing software. I do all my editing with it. It's not as good as Photoshop but it's really close.

    It's awesome that you guys ride together. I could only wish for that in my future wife.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim-H
    http://www.gimp.org/

    Great, free editing software. I do all my editing with it. It's not as good as Photoshop but it's really close.

    It's awesome that you guys ride together. I could only wish for that in my future wife.
    Thanks! We enjoy every ride! So I am curious as to what my images are lacking as far as editing is concerned? I am missing something? Maybe someone can tell me? I'm open minded enough to take constructive criticism. Mr. Berkley you are welcome to chime in as well...that response was really vague. It's my understanding that the more you do on the front end, and less in post processing, the better off you are? In the time I've owned a regular 35mm slr, editing was not an option...paper choice being the only variance. Perhaps monitor temp. & resolution differences allow others to see things I do not? Is editing a form of correcting, or manipulating until one is satisfied? Educate me if I am ignorant!
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtluke
    I've been really trying to find an opportunity to be more experimental with bike racing pictures. I can't risk blowing a shot though, I have since attracted 2-4 other photographers out at the races now that they have figured out that you can make money at this.

    I often try to experiment on the pro class when they have 4 laps, they almost never buy their pictures and they certainly don't buy 4 so I can at least try some stuff. But usually that's at about hour 10 of me sitting alone, in the woods, too often in the rain so I have basically no drive to do anything at that point.

    Anyway another pic, my friend Nick who is always photogenic
    looking at the shadows, do you have a wireless triggered flash camera right?

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    Thanks! We enjoy every ride! So I am curious as to what my images are lacking as far as editing is concerned? I am missing something? Maybe someone can tell me? I'm open minded enough to take constructive criticism. Mr. Berkley you are welcome to chime in as well...that response was really vague. It's my understanding that the more you do on the front end, and less in post processing, the better off you are? In the time I've owned a regular 35mm slr, editing was not an option...paper choice being the only variance. Perhaps monitor temp. & resolution differences allow others to see things I do not? Is editing a form of correcting, or manipulating until one is satisfied? Educate me if I am ignorant!
    I'm not sure, I liked your pictures. I was just suggesting the software because you didn't have anything to edit with.
    I like to do as much work up front as I can too. Most of my pictures are just cropped, I normally don't mess with much.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclotic
    Isn't the T2i down to about $725 new? As far as what little I've read, the T2i seemed highest rated for the $, performance & class. Def. not knocking your acquisition.
    The T2i kit was $909, the T1i was $699. I'm happy with the buy. After throwing down for the external flash, memory card, and extra battery I was just under $1000.

    So far I like it. The body functions a lot like my old Elan 7E and takes great pictures. I wasn't able to get out on the trail this weekend, but took a few pics around the garage and I'm really happy with the picture quality.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike Photography-stab.jpg  

    Bike Photography-dawg3.jpg  


  66. #66
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    Personally I like vivid colors. I took your 4th picture down and did a little HDR tone mapping with it.

    That would be my only suggestions, less washout on the colors. Unless that's the goal you're going for.
    Last edited by Tim-H; 09-22-2010 at 03:45 PM. Reason: deleted pictures

  67. #67
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    Not what what I meant

    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    I currently have no editing software...beyond simple things
    There are 3 shots of your wife going down hill. Pick one. There are three shots of your wife crossing a creek. Pick one. 4 shots riding with branches in front. Pick one.
    It can be hard to decide and takes practice.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 09-21-2010 at 09:11 PM.

  68. #68
    Y no grease?ლ(ಠ益ಠლ
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    What Mike said.

    I just went thru 100 pics in Lroom hitting X on nearly all of them..
    Climbing ain't easy
    when you're fat and greasy
    - 2 Bigsteve

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    There are 3 shots of your wife going down hill. Pick one. There are three shots of your wife crossing a creek. Pick one. 4 shots riding with branches in front. Pick one.
    It can be hard to decide and takes practice.
    Duly noted.. and I understand.. thanks! .. I will cull the herd in the future.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim-H
    I'm not sure, I liked your pictures. I was just suggesting the software because you didn't have anything to edit with.
    I like to do as much work up front as I can too. Most of my pictures are just cropped, I normally don't mess with much.
    Thanks for the tips! and the link.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  71. #71
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    Great thread!!

    I love photography and mountain biking is a cool subject. Too bad I don't have any mountain bike pics


    oh well, here are a few that are kind of related ..... two wheels anyway..










    Mountain bike riding is the new dirt bike riding. It's cheaper and you don't get shot at as often.

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