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  1. #1
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    Best way to go OTB

    I'm not someone to repeat my mistakes, but I can't figure out how to learn from this one.

    My front quick release somehow buckled and I was OTB in a millisecond. I didn't have time to instinctively put out my hands, I just landed on my head and was seeing the colors of my helmet visor, the dirt, and then laying backwards on the trail on my back the next I knew. I probably fractured a vertebrae or two so I'll be getting that checked out.

    What is the best way to prepare for going OTB like this? I have crashed dozens of times and usually manage to land on my hands or knees, but this was the worst because I couldn't even prepare.

    What would you do, how would you avoid landing on your head? What could I do differently, other than riding thru-axles?

  2. #2
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    I am going to have to go with the Fox Flip for the win!

    Best way to go OTB-foxflip.jpg



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  3. #3
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    Well, I hope you're mistaken about the fractured vertebrae-good luck with that. The best way to survive an endo is usually to tuck and roll. I practice on carpet and grass doing somersaults and shoulder rolls (alternate shoulders) until it's instinctive. It's kinda fun to practice, and entertaining for sig-oths, pets and children!

  4. #4
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    I like to watch the pros and take note of how they go OTB. Professional grade crashes and human spear imitations are something I work on every chance I get.

    Sorry, couldn't resist the opportunity to be a wise guy. Other than making sure your bike is sound and your helmet fits correctly, I don't know how one prepares to crash, especially for an instantaneous OTB. Some things happen faster than the human nervous system can respond.

    Now how to avoid an OTB in the first place is a different story. Making sure you skewer is tight is a good start, and through axles are certainly stronger than a skewer and offer added stiffness and stability to the front end. Riding position, keeping weight off the saddle, arms and legs loose, weight back on descents - all these techniques have been written about at length.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  5. #5
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    Learn how your bike works first? Ride within your limits and get some skills? Also learn how to do some shoulder rolls. Get a 29er? For me, bigger wheels meant better rolllover and getting the front wheel caught much less.
    Last edited by leeboh; 02-28-2018 at 10:46 AM.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Best way to go OTB-alg-otb-betting-jpg.jpg
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by scar View Post
    I am going to have to go with the Fox Flip for the win!

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    Oh you guys are great

    Definitely have to say practice makes perfect, but even just watching the pros shows that it can go wrong when things happen too quickly.

    Definitely know your bike (I do) and I've had enough crashes to get plenty experience, but this one makes me scared enough I might consider a neck brace. Maybe those things actually have some merit. But wearing a neck brace might put more strain on lower vertebrae in a crash?

  9. #9
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    Growing up at an early age of 8 and riding dirt bikes, motocross. I learned early on to tuck and roll. Tuck your head into your chest and roll with it. The instinct of putting out your hands to break your fall can often times end with more of an injury. Breaking your wrists or arms. And you tend to look in the direction of your fall which means your head is upright, which could cause even more of a traumatic injury, like a broken neck or facial impact.

    Advice: Tuck your head into you chest and roll with it.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    I might consider a neck brace. Maybe those things actually have some merit. But wearing a neck brace might put more strain on lower vertebrae in a crash?
    Neck braces only work with full face helmets.
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  11. #11
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    I always try to shoulder roll if I can. All of my OTB's have been "foreseeable" or happen slow enough for me to react...meaning, they have always been a result of operator error rather than equipment error. There are some cases though where I am able to "launch" myself from the bike and it becomes a less ugly OTB...I got this from lots of trick-failure on my BMX. There are some places where I would rather launch than roll (like on roots or rocks) if I have a choice.

    But the best thing that saves me is getting far back behind the bike going down and having the "rubbery legs"...there have been many times where what could have been a bad OTB just becomes another type of wreck where my butt or legs are the initial landing surface, or I "loop out" like when failing a manual and land on my feet, or something that is not my neck or head
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  12. #12
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    Holy crap, that sucked. I hope you get better. I've only gone OTB a few times, once badly, and I actually fainted in mid-air, I guess as a nervous defense mechanism. I woke up when I hit the ground hard. Prescription sunglasses smashed on my face, luckily they didn't take out an eye or two. So for me there was no practicing OTB, one moment I saw the handlebars twist sideways, the next I was picking myself up off the ground. I had zero memory of going through the air.
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  13. #13
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    If you have the time to think about how you're going to posture and land, YOU'RE DOING IT WRONG.

    I would concede that maybe practicing some shoulder rolls or the like might serve to create some muscle memory and instinctual positioning but as I have said over and over, unfortunately learned by doing on occasion, my get-offs that include OTB moves have come as immediate and most unexpected occurrences. There has NEVER been any time to think about landing and barely enough to even comprehend what is happening in the first place. I prefer it that way. I ride better because of it.

  14. #14
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    Front release should not somehow buckle so you first need to figure out what was wrong there and correct it. Were you going fast downhill? If so, dropper post gives you room to get your weight much better positioned for not going OTB. But if you are going OTB, try to do a shoulder roll.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    But if you are going OTB, try to do a shoulder roll.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  16. #16
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    So far I have managed to avoid OTB in my life... though I have had plenty of opportunity... When I was 9 and riding wheelies a lot I apparently did not have my front wheel in properly and it just came off... the loss of weight up front allowed the bike to simply tilt back so no OTB. It was funny as, well, you know...

    The second time was even better- I was maybe 15 at the time and had a Matthews Moxie BMX with the girder front fork- dual crown style mounting- and we were riding our bikes through the elementary school just up the street and I was getting chased out by the custodian- laughing my a$$ off- and rode out the door and launched off the top of the stairs... I was having a blast! After landing I pulled a wheelie to ride away and the forks sheared at the bottom of the headtube! I had to go back and get my front wheel, head hanging in shame... My stepbrother and friends were laughing pretty hard.

  17. #17
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    I think this weekend, by using poor technique I made myself go OTB! When replaying it back in my head, I think I could have saved the situation. (damn front brake)

    It happens too fast to react, for me. I just go over and try to tuck.
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  18. #18
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    2:06 shows the best way to OTB by far.
    I manage to pull it off most times.

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Front release should not somehow buckle so you first need to figure out what was wrong there and correct it. Were you going fast downhill? If so, dropper post gives you room to get your weight much better positioned for not going OTB. But if you are going OTB, try to do a shoulder roll.
    You're absolutely right. Mechanical failures shouldn't happen if your bike is all tuned up and properly built. I'm blaming this crash on me because I knew my cap was looking worn, and it was just a beater bike until the good one was built up. Bad bad logic. The axle was bent after the crash, but I think the first thing that happened was the cap coming off, I never found the cap again. I was shredding 15 some mph down a twisty rutted section of trail and then launched a bunny hop down a two-foot rut ledge which apparently let the wheel slide out of the quick release holder so that when I landed the fork sat on the tire (bent the rim) and then the whole rig of course went faceplanting.

    I agree with the suggestions to tuck your head subconsciously if uncertain of what's happening Makes sense.

    I have a new appreciation for buying new components before the old ones actually break.

  20. #20
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    A deep hip hinge keeps your weight balanced and helps prevent OTB scenarios.

    Check it out here, from Zen Master Lee McCormack: http://www.llbmtb.com/lessons/row-an...ing-positions/
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    2:06 shows the best way to OTB by far.
    I manage to pull it off most times.

    I did that by accident once. It's pretty impressive to pull off. I've had better success pulling off a good roll where I escape unscathed. I've had a few, though, where there was no time for any of that and I just ended up sprawled on the ground. I don't have any trouble keeping my face and limbs out of harm's way, though. Don't think I've ever had anything more than a bruise from an OTB.

  22. #22
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    After years of riding and many 'incidents' I can only say the best plan for me is...DON'T CRASH.

    Another thing I've learned...whatever it is you are doing, if there are skills and consequences involved, sh*t will eventually happen no matter how 'good' you think you are. Sports like skiing and mountain biking, motocross, are very similar due to constant variables.

    I'm 58 and have done this for a long time. I have some skills, know the terrain, know my limits, maintain my gear, etc. Terrain changes, seasonal conditions, climate (ice, snow, rain) makes things different every ride. That's what keeps it fresh!

    My most recent incident was 5 weeks ago on a night ride (New England single track...lots of rocks). I had a very minor pedal strike which 1,000 times would not even register as a concern. It caused front wheel to wander slightly to left side of trail EXACTLY where a small log sat. Was not going very fast but it was dark so I didn't even see the log and BOOM...went OTB, tucked, bounced and rolled down the rocky pitch that followed. Impact was on my left shoulder...uh-oh...separated my shoulder.

    It's always the same...everything is great until it isn't. It never happens in slow motion...natural instincts kick in to protect yourself and all you can do is hope whatever impact is coming will be inconsequential. I'm always amazed at how quickly my ass can get cratered into the ground!
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  23. #23
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    Like in the video, I've managed sometimes to "step out" of the bike when the rear wheel comes up to whack me from behind. It's just something that happens without my thinking about it. But if I'm planted in the saddle with weight forward, there's no hope.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  24. #24
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    That's why safety checking your bike is important, because of the front wheel comes off it's going to be fast and bad.
    That's where I'd focus. Learn and practice good safety checks on the bike to prevent instantaneous otb's.
    I had one years ago where I hit a wire across a trail that I never saw, going like fifteen mph and it instantaneously piledrived me into the ground on my head before I knew what was happening. I am lucky I didn't break my neck.

  25. #25
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    Just double checking here but you know the quick release lever is a cam lock, not just a wingnut right? A QR should really never just come loose on its own

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
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    hence the "try" in "try to do a shoulder roll".
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I did that by accident once. It's pretty impressive to pull off.
    Easy to practice on some grass.
    Just endo until it's too late to turn back, then walk off and leave the bike behind you.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Easy to practice on some grass.
    Just endo until it's too late to turn back, then walk off and leave the bike behind you.
    Just donít forget to turn around and go back and get the bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  29. #29
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    Thru axles.
    Tuck n roll.

    Hope you are OK!

  30. #30
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    sometimes there's no planing... you just go with the flow.

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  31. #31
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    Passion! for going over the bars. Next up, passion for picking your nose and eating it while riding.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott O View Post
    Passion! for going over the bars. Next up, passion for picking your nose and eating it while riding.
    You need half finger gloves for that, and that's so uncool. They should make gloves with just one half finger for that - lefty and righty versions. Glove makers - are you listening?
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    sometimes there's no planing... you just go with the flow.

    Holy crap, I think that guy broke his ass bone. I hope he'll walk again.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  34. #34
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    I've always thought that this was a really skillful way to crash!


  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    2:06 shows the best way to OTB by far.
    I manage to pull it off most times.
    I've done that a couple times, also without the benefit of any prior practice. It helped that I was on a (loaner) bike that was about a size too small.
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  36. #36
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    I like that Seth Bikehack's bailout video, it stresses the importance of not tripping over your bars while flying through the air.

    IME there are two types of crashes: Ones where time slows down and it's possible to make decisions mid-crash; and ones where you go instantly from riding along happily to being a painful pile of crumpled boneheap, wondering what the hell just happened. I prefer the former, though it's not as if we're generally given a choice in the matter.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    I've done that a couple times, also without the benefit of any prior practice. It helped that I was on a (loaner) bike that was about a size too small.
    Iíve managed to do that a few times using clipless pedals. Itís amazing how fast the brain reacts in an emergency situation.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  38. #38
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    Last time I went OTB was from from a pedal strike, and I did not clear the bike before I hit the ground. Never attained a good tuck, and landed on my right arm and shoulder. Arm was fine, but cracked a rib. So, tuck and roll is probably best advice, unless you can leap over your bars and outrun your unpiloted bike.

    I think another option is to grab a low-hanging vine and Tarzan swing to safety, but you're probably looking at 1-in-5 at best for success on that one.

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  39. #39
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    I don't think I could do the bar jump, if Richie Rude didn't try in his case it probably doesn't happen often in real life. I did like how he tucked and rolled though.

    Got X-rayed and no fractures, but lots of inflammation and mis-alignment in the lumbar vertebrae. So glad because I really am looking forward to racing this spring.

    Glad I was wearing a helmet, but I'm kinda baffled how my helmet didn't give a crap about this, no foam gouges or even cracks in the plastic.

    Yes, I bought some nice thru-axles

  40. #40
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    Let's face it, going OTB isn't really something you can prepare for unless if you're going at a slower speed and can react to it. If you're going pretty fast and you stack it, there's no real time to brace for impact. Instinct will usually try to get you to lean back so you don't go OTB but if the momentum is in full force, fighting that isn't very likely. That said, if you're going slow enough and know that OTB is inevitable, leaping over the front of your bars is a good option or the good old tuck and roll.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Got X-rayed and no fractures, but lots of inflammation and mis-alignment in the lumbar vertebrae. So glad because I really am looking forward to racing this spring.

    Yes, I bought some nice thru-axles
    Don't belittle the fact there is no strongly visible damage, especially when only have an x-ray! I'm living proof. 5 years ago on Super Bowl Sunday, I woke up in the morning and my legs no longer functioned other than holding me up. I had little to no control of my gate as my brain was no longer properly communicating to the legs. 5 days later I was in surgery due to a constricted spinal chord by severe stenosis at L4-L5-L6. I had a discectomy, fusion, and a Ti plate installed. All stemmed from what seemed to be a minor hyper-extension of the neck from a minor event 2 years prior. X-rays were non-indicative but I did have a bit of neuropathy in my left arm after the first injury. Both arms at first, then after traction therapy, all was forgotten. From that point, without realizing it, I was slowly losing my legs. Therapy for a low back issue was not improving my mobility or leg strength even walking 3 miles a day. Everyone in the medical fray missed it till that fateful morning when I woke up almost paralyzed. The benefit to it all was the recovery process is what put me on a mountain bike and has kept me there today. Be watching for those signs in the future.

    Quote Originally Posted by scaryfast View Post
    Let's face it, going OTB isn't really something you can prepare for unless if you're going at a slower speed and can react to it.
    I can argue that point, respectfully of course! The absolute WORST and most damaging get-off I have had on a mountain bike was at maybe 2-3 mph at best. Rolling into a downhill switchback in front of a brand new rider girl we had introduced to mtb from road. I was showing her turn entry techniques on a slightly sketchy left hand decreasing radius turn and before turn entry, I went wide and was showing her the low outside weighted pedal while turning my body into the bike. Unbenounced to me, a deep rock was jutting out of the bench cut covered by grass and my low pedal hit it. It was one of the most violent forces I have ever experienced on the bike. In the blink of an eye, the first thing I saw was the ground about 6" from my face in a full OTB move. My hands were out in front, FWIW. I was clipped in and my buddy behind us said my bike went so high in the air that it did 2 end-over-ends and landed almost flat on both wheels, but a bit harder on the rear blowing out the sidewall. I jumped up in a total WTF WAS THAT! manner and was freaking about my brand new carbon Evo build with new carbon hoops. It rolled itself off trail and neatly leaned up against a wire fence unharmed aside from the tire. I, on the other hand had a gash from bottom knee to upper shin down to the bone, splayed open and bleeding. Other than than the impact effect, pain hadn't set in. Our new rider was pretty freaked when she saw my leg. She actually noticed it before I did. Her eyes were the size of saucers and I was wondering what she was looking at till I looked down! We shot a load of CO2 into the tire and I hauled ass making it to my truck, not far away, before I went flat again. Rather than an ER trip, I went home and took one of my buddies left-over Oxy's, used a gnarly brush to scrub the wound and butterflied it together and took real good care of it. Healed great! But that whole thing sucked!

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Got X-rayed and no fractures, but lots of inflammation and mis-alignment in the lumbar vertebrae. So glad because I really am looking forward to racing this spring.

    Glad I was wearing a helmet, but I'm kinda baffled how my helmet didn't give a crap about this, no foam gouges or even cracks in the plastic.
    Good to hear it's not worse and hopefully on the mend.

    Also, that helmet is done. Even if you don't see anything, it took the hit. There's often hidden damage that can make it ineffective if it happens again. Tell it thank you and get a new one.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Got X-rayed and no fractures, but lots of inflammation and mis-alignment in the lumbar vertebrae. So glad because I really am looking forward to racing this spring.

    Glad I was wearing a helmet, but I'm kinda baffled how my helmet didn't give a crap about this, no foam gouges or even cracks in the plastic.
    I donít want to bring your username into this but, suck it up soldier.



    Joking ^ Iím glad to hear it didnít come out worse. Good vibes to you in healing quick.
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 03-04-2018 at 01:36 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  44. #44
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    Best way to go OTB - short Answer

    Feet first
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Best way to go OTB - short Answer

    Feet first
    Ever done it that way?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by sissypants View Post
    Ever done it that way?
    I know I've ended up on my feet running down the trail as the bike tumbles after me. Whether I stepped out to the side or straight over the bars, I'm not sure - maybe both ways, depending on the situation. It happens so fast, pure reflex at work. I also do the head first variety.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  47. #47
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    Back in like 2009-ish, when I'd been mountain biking for about two years, my wife and I took our first road trip to Colorado. I was on a old Trek hardtail that was two sizes too small for me, with V brakes and cheesy fork boots and super long bar ends. I loved that bike.

    Anyway, one day we ended up riding Trail 401 sort of by accident. After a climb that nearly killed me, we whooped and hollered as we swooped through curvy turns on the downhill. Coming down the trail, I got surprised by a little pile of rocks, panicked, grabbed a handful of front break, and went flying over the bars.

    The area around Trail 401 has spectacular wildflowers during the summer, and that's what I landed on: a nice, soft patch of sweet-smelling yellow and blue flowers. Unhurt, I started laughing immediately and even took a moment to savor the blue-bird sky from my newly prone position.

    That, I humbly submit, is the best way to go OTB.
    "Never trust a man in a blue trench coat. Never drive a car when you're dead." -- Tom Waits

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by heartland View Post
    Back in like 2009-ish, when I'd been mountain biking for about two years, my wife and I took our first road trip to Colorado. I was on a old Trek hardtail that was two sizes too small for me, with V brakes and cheesy fork boots and super long bar ends. I loved that bike.

    Anyway, one day we ended up riding Trail 401 sort of by accident. After a climb that nearly killed me, we whooped and hollered as we swooped through curvy turns on the downhill. Coming down the trail, I got surprised by a little pile of rocks, panicked, grabbed a handful of front break, and went flying over the bars.

    The area around Trail 401 has spectacular wildflowers during the summer, and that's what I landed on: a nice, soft patch of sweet-smelling yellow and blue flowers. Unhurt, I started laughing immediately and even took a moment to savor the blue-bird sky from my newly prone position.

    That, I humbly submit, is the best way to go OTB.
    I don't think many can top that landing....you neglected to say about how all the forest animals gathered around you singing
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

    15 Surly Krampus
    LET IT SNOW!

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    sometimes there's no planing... you just go with the flow.

    Wow, that guy behind has some serious handling skill to miss him!

  50. #50
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    I've been OTB four dozen times at least. I believe gymnastics I learned at an early age, including hours of trampoline, as well as martial art training (specifically hundreds of Judo rolls and falls) help me survive these crashes. There is no time to think during a crash. Your body just does what it knows.

    One otb crash where I did get hurt was because at the end of a spectacular Superman and tuck and roll during a race, I ended up in a boulder patch. My left lower back and hip impacted a boulder at the end of the roll. It took 6 weeks for the bruise to fade away on that one. It happened when I launched a blind drop at about 25 mph and found a fellow racer walking his bike in the only possible line just a few yards downhill from the landing. I had a choice of flying off the mountain to my right, piling into the guy, or trying to survive the boulders to the left. That one hurt.
    Consciousness, that annoying time between bike rides.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Don't belittle the fact there is no strongly visible damage, especially when only have an x-ray! I'm living proof. 5 years ago on Super Bowl Sunday, I woke up in the morning and my legs no longer functioned other than holding me up. I had little to no control of my gate as my brain was no longer properly communicating to the legs. 5 days later I was in surgery due to a constricted spinal chord by severe stenosis at L4-L5-L6. I had a discectomy, fusion, and a Ti plate installed. All stemmed from what seemed to be a minor hyper-extension of the neck from a minor event 2 years prior. X-rays were non-indicative but I did have a bit of neuropathy in my left arm after the first injury. Both arms at first, then after traction therapy, all was forgotten. From that point, without realizing it, I was slowly losing my legs. Therapy for a low back issue was not improving my mobility or leg strength even walking 3 miles a day. Everyone in the medical fray missed it till that fateful morning when I woke up almost paralyzed. The benefit to it all was the recovery process is what put me on a mountain bike and has kept me there today. Be watching for those signs in the future.



    I can argue that point, respectfully of course! The absolute WORST and most damaging get-off I have had on a mountain bike was at maybe 2-3 mph at best. Rolling into a downhill switchback in front of a brand new rider girl we had introduced to mtb from road. I was showing her turn entry techniques on a slightly sketchy left hand decreasing radius turn and before turn entry, I went wide and was showing her the low outside weighted pedal while turning my body into the bike. Unbenounced to me, a deep rock was jutting out of the bench cut covered by grass and my low pedal hit it. It was one of the most violent forces I have ever experienced on the bike. In the blink of an eye, the first thing I saw was the ground about 6" from my face in a full OTB move. My hands were out in front, FWIW. I was clipped in and my buddy behind us said my bike went so high in the air that it did 2 end-over-ends and landed almost flat on both wheels, but a bit harder on the rear blowing out the sidewall. I jumped up in a total WTF WAS THAT! manner and was freaking about my brand new carbon Evo build with new carbon hoops. It rolled itself off trail and neatly leaned up against a wire fence unharmed aside from the tire. I, on the other hand had a gash from bottom knee to upper shin down to the bone, splayed open and bleeding. Other than than the impact effect, pain hadn't set in. Our new rider was pretty freaked when she saw my leg. She actually noticed it before I did. Her eyes were the size of saucers and I was wondering what she was looking at till I looked down! We shot a load of CO2 into the tire and I hauled ass making it to my truck, not far away, before I went flat again. Rather than an ER trip, I went home and took one of my buddies left-over Oxy's, used a gnarly brush to scrub the wound and butterflied it together and took real good care of it. Healed great! But that whole thing sucked!
    Oh for sure. I've gone otb at slow speed too. Let's just say you have a greater chance of recovery at a slow speed but the likelyhood of still eating it is pretty high lol

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by LargeMan View Post
    Wow, that guy behind has some serious handling skill to miss him!
    People who think road riders have no bike handling skills are wrong. It's just a different type of handling skill.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    People who think road riders have no bike handling skills are wrong. It's just a different type of handling skill.
    Years ago on my skinny tire road bike, I was forced off the road onto a soft shoulder by an angry driver in a long line of traffic. I was able to get my ass off the back of the seat in time to avoid an OTB, and let him know he was #1 at the same time.
    Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.
    ó Carl Sagan

  54. #54
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    ^ I was just gonna say the tuck & roll may not be the best case into a boulder field.


    I Richie Rude'd it like that right into a 4' diameter doug fir log. Was going about 27 mph pedalling hard when my chain snapped and I hit the log when I was up over the bike like that in a vulnerable position. Broke 2 ribs and seperated several more and blew the bursa in my knee. It was the second time that season I broke ribs mtbing. Hopefully I'm good for a while.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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