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Thread: 127 Hours

  1. #1
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    127 Hours

    Upcoming film about Aron Ralston, the dude who cut his arm off to save his life...with a little bit of mountain biking on the big screen.

    See trailer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba1IhHAqLgw

  2. #2
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    The trailer makes both the canyoneer and the mountain biker in me cringe with delight. This is going to be Utah's Vertical Limit.



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  3. #3
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    That movie looks like it'll be pretty interesting
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  4. #4
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    The Real 127 Hours

    Just saw most* of Dateline with Aron Ralston interviewed by Tom Brokaw as they revisit the place of Aron's entrapment in Blue John Canyon.

    This gave me an entirely different sense of the guy -- graduate of Carnegie Mellon, with a double major in engineering and French, an accomplished pianist (with a minor in Piano Performance). Not a mindless thrill seeker, but an, um, mindful thrill seeker or perhaps someone pulled with great intensity and passion to seek and experience mountains, deserts, and everything in between. Not a loner, but someone who loved to experience that environment in solitude.

    It is obvious that his intellect, willpower, and engineering skills helped him survive, but I'm not sure anyone can understand what really carried him through 6 days of thirst & severe dehydration, nights of hypothermia, profound sleep deprivation, shock/trauma and how he could even be in any condition to marshal the willpower to amputate his own arm after 6 days and get himself out of the canyon is truly amazing.

    You can find it in segments on YouTube. The episode of Dateline is (no surprise here) Feb. 6: The true story of Aron Ralston. It shows a lot of his video footage from the first two or three days, although that switches to audio as the days go on; at Aron's request, they did not show the video portion, since he thought it would be too difficult for family and friends to watch. Early on they play a college recording of Aron playing Chopin and you truly get a sense of what was lost.

    Anyway, beautiful interview. I think Tom Brokaw was more than a little blown away by the reality of Blue John Canyon and what Aron experienced there.

    *Uverse didn't record the very last part, so it's YouTube for me.

    Oh, I almost forgot: always remember to tell somebody where you are going.

  5. #5
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    That Dateline episode was on during the Super Bowl. Needless to say, I didn't watch the Super Bowl.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus
    That Dateline episode was on during the Super Bowl. Needless to say, I didn't watch the Super Bowl.

    Yeah, I caught it as well when I got home from work.

    I loved the, always be the one with a knife.

  7. #7
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    That is frickin' hilarious!!!! I wish I had that kind of upper body strength.

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    i read his book years ago. its called between a rock and a hard place. its a great read and he recaps a bunch of his other adventures. the movie was well done but didnt follow the book like i assumed it would.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wizzer16
    i read his book years ago. its called between a rock and a hard place. its a great read and he recaps a bunch of his other adventures.
    Thanks for the tip; I now have it on reserve at the library. Almost all copies in Austin Public Libraries are checked out and both copies at the UT Austin library are checked out, so lots of folks must not have watched the SuperBowl.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuky
    The trailer makes both the canyoneer and the mountain biker in me cringe with delight. This is going to be Utah's Vertical Limit.
    I'm so looking forward to your instructional mtb movie

    Kasper

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wizzer16
    i read his book years ago. its called between a rock and a hard place. its a great read and he recaps a bunch of his other adventures. the movie was well done but didnt follow the book like i assumed it would.
    I read the book as well and I thought the movie followed the book rather closely; at least... compared to other book-inspired movies. Sure the movie left a lot of stuff out (such as his prior adventures in the Tetons, Grand Canyon etc) but the vast majority of stuff that was in the movie was true to the book and the additional liberties that the director took where, in my opinion, nice character-building segments.

    Either way, great flick and great book. Highly recommended!
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  12. #12
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    The producers contacted us, and we built that replica of his old Rocky Mountain for the movie... Pretty cool!



    Quote Originally Posted by Atom B
    Upcoming film about Aron Ralston, the dude who cut his arm off to save his life...with a little bit of mountain biking on the big screen.

    See trailer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba1IhHAqLgw
    Director of Product - MTB
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd97
    I read the book as well and I thought the movie followed the book rather closely; at least... compared to other book-inspired movies. Sure the movie left a lot of stuff out (such as his prior adventures in the Tetons, Grand Canyon etc) but the vast majority of stuff that was in the movie was true to the book and the additional liberties that the director took where, in my opinion, nice character-building segments.

    Either way, great flick and great book. Highly recommended!

    your absolutly right. i should have specified. The account of him being trapped was spot on but the priors were left out.
    count your blessings

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    I also read the book. He's a surprisingly good writer. I've read many "man vs. nature" books and his was well written and very engaging. Hope to see the movie soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildharejac
    That is frickin' hilarious!!!! I wish I had that kind of upper body strength.
    I don't think that getting some laughs was his intention when he cut off his arm. Trying to impress some chicks? Maybe.

  16. #16
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    I too was struck with the impression that the movie did a piss poor job of portraying the real Aaron Ralston. It was all sexed up and I thought it kinda sucked. Produced by some English guy that has no real love for the west. Clearly, as they missed an opportunity to show some spectacular scenery outside of the canyon. BOO!

    I was out there while they were filming. Driving into the Maze area, I passed the larger Horseshoe canyon and much to my amazement there was a ****ing helecopter with a porta-potty swinging 200 feet beneath it. Not to mention what looked like a few hundred semi trucks and all that jazz. I kept going.

    I hope they had to pay a FAT fee for doing what they did......if I had a vacation planned in that particular area at the same time, I'd have been really really pissed.

    I regret having paid to watch the movie too. Should have pirated it.

  17. #17
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    Isn't Tom Brokaw a pretty accomplished climber

    Too? I remember reading about him in Rock and Ice or something. He's done some big expeditions. Did they talk about that?
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattsteve
    I too was struck with the impression that the movie did a piss poor job of portraying the real Aaron Ralston. It was all sexed up and I thought it kinda sucked. Produced by some English guy that has no real love for the west. Clearly, as they missed an opportunity to show some spectacular scenery outside of the canyon. BOO!

    I was out there while they were filming. Driving into the Maze area, I passed the larger Horseshoe canyon and much to my amazement there was a ****ing helecopter with a porta-potty swinging 200 feet beneath it. Not to mention what looked like a few hundred semi trucks and all that jazz. I kept going.

    I hope they had to pay a FAT fee for doing what they did......if I had a vacation planned in that particular area at the same time, I'd have been really really pissed.

    I regret having paid to watch the movie too. Should have pirated it.
    Pretty funny given Aron was on the set a lot and loved the way it was being filmed.

    That film really inspired me.....I'm still looking for that yeti-turquoise blue Cenote ....

    All I know is that Utah has always had my soul trapped in the rocks there and I have no intention of severing it. I leave there only temporarily.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattsteve
    I too was struck with the impression that the movie did a piss poor job of portraying the real Aaron Ralston. It was all sexed up and I thought it kinda sucked. Produced by some English guy that has no real love for the west. Clearly, as they missed an opportunity to show some spectacular scenery outside of the canyon. BOO!

    I was out there while they were filming. Driving into the Maze area, I passed the larger Horseshoe canyon and much to my amazement there was a ****ing helecopter with a porta-potty swinging 200 feet beneath it. Not to mention what looked like a few hundred semi trucks and all that jazz. I kept going.

    I hope they had to pay a FAT fee for doing what they did......if I had a vacation planned in that particular area at the same time, I'd have been really really pissed.

    I regret having paid to watch the movie too. Should have pirated it.
    I do not know 'the real Aron Ralston' having never met the guy. Have you? Also, are the facts of being English and having a 'real' love of the West mutually exclusive? You imply as much in your remarks. Sounds like you rather selfishly want to keep the 'West' all to yourself! I saw the movie and thought it showed the scenery rather well, but then I am English so probably am unable to truly appreciate the 'real' love that some have of the West. If I want to see scenery, I would rather go to the place and see it for myself, not watch a movie that is a drama anyway, and not a travelogue.
    It is a movie for heavens sake, you need trucks and stuff to make it, and like the previous poster said, and as I have read, Ralston seemed to be approving of the result and the process. If you want to pirate the movie and potentially contribute to putting a lot of your fellow Americans out of work, not to mention an insignificant Englishman, go right ahead.
    Last edited by rockerc; 02-09-2011 at 05:12 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattsteve
    I too was struck with the impression that the movie did a piss poor job of portraying the real Aaron Ralston. It was all sexed up and I thought it kinda sucked. Produced by some English guy that has no real love for the west. Clearly, as they missed an opportunity to show some spectacular scenery outside of the canyon.
    Haven't seen the movie, or read the book, did catch a portion of the TV interview though.

    Speaking as an avid outdoors person, he did a bunch of kind of stupid things, based on where he was, and what he was doing, beside the point though....

    Could it be that they didn't show a bunch of sweeping scenery, as a way of expressing the containment of his situation? No point in showing a gorgeuous shot of vast panoramas, when the story is about being pinned in a slot canyon, days from death, you know?

    Into the Wild, we didn't see tons of sunny shots of Denali, happy moose, etc, did we? I'm thinking same kinda thing. Great movie too, BTW.

    Having not seen the movie yet, I may be way off base. As for sexing it up? What would you expect from a big budget movie about someone who lived?

    Into the Wild, couldn't be sexed up, that would have been an insult to a young mans memory.
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  21. #21
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    Most of the movie was shot in a warehouse in Salt Lake City. Only a few sections in the movie were actually shot on location.

    I agree with the post above. It's hard to recreate a sense of claustrophobia with wide, sweeping views.

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    His film / story inspired me....

    To tell friends where I am going when I go out solo.

    And to leave a note on the dash board of my car indicating what I am doing.

    I liked the movie though.

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    The bad part about a note on the windshield is that it can tip off thieves or vandals of how long you will be gone. This might not be a concern in some areas, but it is a problem in some places. Then again, some thieves or vandals don't care whether you leave a note or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd97
    I read the book as well and I thought the movie followed the book rather closely; at least... compared to other book-inspired movies. Sure the movie left a lot of stuff out (such as his prior adventures in the Tetons, Grand Canyon etc) but the vast majority of stuff that was in the movie was true to the book and the additional liberties that the director took where, in my opinion, nice character-building segments.

    Either way, great flick and great book. Highly recommended!
    I read the book and would advise to do so if you want to see the movie. What the movie is unable to do, is explain what his thought process was during the time in the canyon. The movie pretty much followed the book without the hollywood exaggeration like most movies have. But if you read the book, you will have a better understanding of what he's doing and why. Excellent book and a good movie.

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    My wife read the book and she told me that, for the most part, Aron he described himself as taking too much for granted and making a lot of mistakes. Book talks of a time he almost got two of his friends killed in an avalanche. The friends don't talk to him any longer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teebird
    My wife read the book and she told me that, for the most part, Aron he described himself as taking too much for granted and making a lot of mistakes. Book talks of a time he almost got two of his friends killed in an avalanche. The friends don't talk to him any longer.
    Nothing like a sweetheart book deal to make it easier to reflect on how much of a D-bag you are.....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teebird
    My wife read the book and she told me that, for the most part, Aron he described himself as taking too much for granted and making a lot of mistakes. Book talks of a time he almost got two of his friends killed in an avalanche. The friends don't talk to him any longer.
    Guess it takes having to cut your own arm off to make some people wise up.

    Just after the incident, before the book came out, a friend of a friend over heard us talking about it trailside somewhere in CO. He interjects and says to my friend you know he's the guy that almost got blah and blah killed. IIRC, they said it wasn't the first time he had pulled something similar endangering OTHER people's lives.

    If almost getting 2 friends killed by your bad actions doesn't make you change your behavior and you almost get yourself killed continuing stupid habits then I don't feel compelled to give up my time and hard earned money reading your book or watching your movie. IMO, it rewards the bad behavior. I'd say it's been highly rewarding.

    I don't need to read his book to learn the lesson tell somebody where you are and respect your surroundings, I already practiced it. My father taught it to me at about 8 y.o.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by texacajun
    My father taught it to me at about 8 y.o.
    Funny you mention that. My son was about 8 or 9 when we hiked a big peak mid winter. He'd been a typical young whiner on the way up. If you have kids, you get it, and you deal.

    Got up top, rounded the summit, and just got blasted, 70+ MPH winds, whiteout, not good with a young one. It stands out clearly in my mind as the day he grew up, attitude wise. From the moment that the wind hit us, and we couldn't easily see the way back down, he just snapped to. "Okay, what's next, what do we do, I think this is the way, lets go, keep low, we don't want to get blown off, etc"

    He's 17 this week, and winter mountaineering has been a passion of his since that day, never a whine since either. The world we inhabit, shapes us for sure, if we're wise enough to listen....
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  29. #29
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    Interesting points. He (Ralston) is currently being touted around our country as the movie gets released nationally. On the radio, he sounds like a pretty decent, humble guy who went through a pretty horrible ordeal and came out the other side seemingly grateful for the life he still has. The radio hosts are all equally inspired and enthralled.

    At the same time, nobody that I've heard interview him down here seems to bring up the whole point about it being unwise of him to have gone out alone with no trace or indication of his whereabouts. I don't know if perhaps he's tired of it being mentioned, or perhaps it's supposed to be self evident? Or maybe his message is about looking for more in life, or treasuring what you have, rather than his mistake? (or maybe I' just missed the interviews where they brought it up)

    In any case it reminded me of the aforementioned "Into the Wild" and the posts I read about that film and it's subject. Many Alaskan folk I read thought the film was a bad thing, highlighting the senseless loss of someone completely unprepared for the terrain he was entering, and also pointing out his lack of informing anyone of his whereabouts. They also mentioned that if you go to the bus site, there is a book where people (tourists) travel to write about how McCandless inspired them to throw away their material possessions and start fresh. Inspiring, ... I guess for some - maybe we are all a little too obsessed with materialism. That's not for me to decide though.

    But the part I liked the most is that amongst the entries in this book are those written by Alaskan travellers/hikers/etc, indicating conditions at the time, river height, predator threats, and other useful information to hopefully help any other prepared or unprepared folk alike. To me, those are the kinda people we should take clues from: adventurous, but at the same time knowledgeable, informative, helpful and just wise in general.

    Obviously, Ralston was more experienced an adventurer than McCandless - but both seemed to have suffered by omitting to tell anyone of their whereabouts.

    In the end I guess it wouldn't make a very 'sexy' story would it? Bunch of experienced, wise people hike around safely and nothing goes wrong. The end. Or, bunch of experienced, wise people hike around safely and something goes wrong, but people aware of their location find them shortly after, or zero in on their emergency beacon. The end.

    I doubt I'll see 127 hours. Mainly because, well, it just doesn't grab me personally. "True Grit" on the other hand, which I saw last night, was quite entertaining.

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    Ralston is a d bag. the only thing he's done right is self promotion. why is it that our society makes idiots rich. he has done nothing but wrong in the backcountry and gets rewarded, most people like him end up dead because of their stupidity but it's like this guy cut his arm of so he could write a book, do the talk show circuit and make a movie. LOSER
    there are alot of passionate people out there doing amazing things right and safe that nobody is paying to make movies of.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pfarrell
    Ralston is a d bag. the only thing he's done right is self promotion. why is it that our society makes idiots rich. he has done nothing but wrong in the backcountry and gets rewarded, most people like him end up dead because of their stupidity but it's like this guy cut his arm of so he could write a book, do the talk show circuit and make a movie. LOSER
    there are alot of passionate people out there doing amazing things right and safe that nobody is paying to make movies of.
    But how do you REALLY feel about it?
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    He is holding back. I for one thing that it is a great movie to inform the uniformed of what can really go wrong out there highlighted by the biggest need of them all preparation!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfarrell
    Ralston is a d bag. the only thing he's done right is self promotion. why is it that our society makes idiots rich. he has done nothing but wrong in the backcountry and gets rewarded, most people like him end up dead because of their stupidity but it's like this guy cut his arm of so he could write a book, do the talk show circuit and make a movie. LOSER
    there are alot of passionate people out there doing amazing things right and safe that nobody is paying to make movies of.
    I'd say the only thing he did right was only put his life at risk. The one bright side of being a colossal bone head is no search & rescue workers, or volunteers were put in harms way to go find him. Eventually the car would get discovered, there'd be a grid search, volunteers would be called for...lives ALWAYS get put at risk besides your own. That lesson should be what the story reveals, not call your mommie before you go hikin'

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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus
    The bad part about a note on the windshield is that it can tip off thieves or vandals of how long you will be gone. This might not be a concern in some areas, but it is a problem in some places. Then again, some thieves or vandals don't care whether you leave a note or not.
    That's true...I think about it when I leave a note. But then I balance that with it could save my ass Which is more important than my Focus

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfarrell
    Ralston is a d bag. the only thing he's done right is self promotion. why is it that our society makes idiots rich. he has done nothing but wrong in the backcountry and gets rewarded, most people like him end up dead because of their stupidity but it's like this guy cut his arm of so he could write a book, do the talk show circuit and make a movie. LOSER
    there are alot of passionate people out there doing amazing things right and safe that nobody is paying to make movies of.
    Maybe if you man up and get out there, take some chances, you could be the next idiot to make it rich. Funny thing is, you're whining more than him.. What's with that? Aron is a cool dude, the poster child for adventure, someone who took his lumps like a man. Rare these days. Usually most people run to a lawyer and that's not bookworthy. Whats your movie going to be about? And what was so wrong about what he did in the backcountry? He knew the terrain, had plenty of gear, experience. A free man...

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by starladear
    Maybe if you man up and get out there, take some chances, you could be the next idiot to make it rich. Funny thing is, you're whining more than him.. What's with that? Aron is a cool dude, the poster child for adventure, someone who took his lumps like a man. Rare these days. Usually most people run to a lawyer and that's not bookworthy. Whats your movie going to be about? And what was so wrong about what he did in the backcountry? He knew the terrain, had plenty of gear, experience. A free man...
    So, we should all head out to the backcountry, not do what everyone knows is a good idea, like letting folks know where you are, get ourselves in a predicament, survive, so we can have a movie made of us?

    Being a "cool dude" is irrelevant, there's plenty of them to go around, who don't make poor choices and almost get friends killed in the process. As for a 'poster child for adventure", I'd much rather have some body who exemplifies the right way to do things when stuff goes wrong be the poster child, not some idiot who was so dehydrated and starving that he manned up enough to hack through his arm. Guess it would have been even cooler if he didn't have a knife and chewed through his arm, thus getting fed in the process. Now THERE'S a Hollywood movie worthy story for ya.....

    So that's what I'm missing in this life, having a movie made of some dumbass shyte I did, so everyone knows what the average moron can do, given enough time money and knowhow....
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by starladear
    And what was so wrong about what he did in the backcountry? He knew the terrain, had plenty of gear, experience. A free man...
    Wrong place at the wrong time. I went through a range of emotions reading his book and my perception of him changed through the course of it. After all was said and done, I thought he was fairly honest in recounting his hubris. At least reading his book might make some people stop and think about things a little more.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by cackalacky
    Wrong place at the wrong time. I went through a range of emotions reading his book and my perception of him changed through the course of it. After all was said and done, I thought he was fairly honest in recounting his hubris. At least reading his book might make some people stop and think about things a little more.
    Agreed.

    And for those of you who also read the book, what scenario are most of you talking about when you said he put other lives in danger? This is just an assumption, but do you mean the situation where him and two skiing friends were caught in the avalanche? I have the book open now and I just went over that section again and I think that that assessment is unfair. For those who have not read the book, the scene in question is a large bowl that his two friends weren't going to initially ski due to potential avalanche risk. However, Aron decided to go anyways and his friends ended up following and the avalanche was triggered from above after they had already reached the bottom. Although they did follow Aron, it's not like they didn't have the option of skipping the bowl and just skiing back to the hut; from the book it seems that they were near the hut already and running the bowl just added an extra skin climb. I'm sure they all had backcountry experience; they were all adults and capable of making their own decisions, and like others have said, while Aron is seemingly the type to own up to the results of his decisions, perhaps his friends were not. Don't forget it was Aron's experience, quick thinking and calm decision making that got his friends OUT of the avalanche that they all (in equal parts) created.

    Just my 0.02, obviously I wasn't there so who knows how it actually went down, but this is my comprehension from the book. As far as the situation at Blue John, Aron admitted to his mistakes and owned up to the hubris and states that many times in the book and it shows in the film. Personally, I respect Aron for the passion he has for the outdoors and his sports, as well as his ability to learn and grow from his experiences and/or mistakes.
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain

  39. #39
    starladear
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    Bottom line is the "d bag" survived. Most people wouldn't. I guess you should tell us what ya think about the Rob Hall/ Krakeur ordeal on Everest. Let me guess. They are scumbags? Apparently harrowing stories from the edge don't excite you and are worthless... Stay classy

  40. #40
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    Rock and a Hard Place

    Finished Between a Rock and a Hard Place last week, and thanks to those of you who recommended it. Very powerful book. I don't feel the need for the movie now; I'm satisfied by the first person account.

    A few notes: Aron Ralston ALWAYS (except once!) left specific information on where he was going, what he was doing and when he might be expected to return.

    The night prior to his accident, he was in the process of calling a friend to report on his plans to hike Blue John Canyon the next day when he realized it was very late and he didn't want to disturb the guy, making his predicament partially a result of being a considerate person.

    When he was trapped in Blue John Canyon, he was in the process of completing his project to
    Climb all 53 of Colorado's Fourteeners (peaks 14,000' or higher).
    Solo.
    In the winter.

    He completed this project in 2005.

    In terms of skill, fitness, equipment, water and food, he was appropriately prepared for his hike, so no issue there.

    It is apparent from reading the book that Aron Ralston is an ultra high energy guy with pretty close to superhuman stamina. He isn't neurotic or pathologically driven -- this ultra high energy state is his NORMAL and he sought to live in a place that could accommodate and challenge his intense energy and desire for Deep Play in the wilderness. Pretty cool really, and most mountain/ski towns in the West are full of people like this. He is still an active high altitude mountaineer (Denali, Kilimanjaro, peaks in Chile and Argentina).

    The reason people read his book and he is in demand as a speaker is that he is damned smart (Phi Beta Kappa), an excellent writer and speaker and he has something to say.

    And yes, I had always assumed that his arm was broken in the accident.........no spoiler for those who have not seen the movie or read the book!

  41. #41
    High Desert MTBer
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    At last some reasoned comments.

  42. #42
    Granny Gear Abuser
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    So, we should all head out to the backcountry, not do what everyone knows is a good idea, like letting folks know where you are, get ourselves in a predicament, survive, so we can have a movie made of us?

    Being a "cool dude" is irrelevant, there's plenty of them to go around, who don't make poor choices and almost get friends killed in the process. As for a 'poster child for adventure", I'd much rather have some body who exemplifies the right way to do things when stuff goes wrong be the poster child, not some idiot who was so dehydrated and starving that he manned up enough to hack through his arm. Guess it would have been even cooler if he didn't have a knife and chewed through his arm, thus getting fed in the process. Now THERE'S a Hollywood movie worthy story for ya.....

    So that's what I'm missing in this life, having a movie made of some dumbass shyte I did, so everyone knows what the average moron can do, given enough time money and knowhow....

    Have you even read the book or watched the Aron approved Hollywood version. Hell, have you even read any of the numerous interviews from when it first happened? The point is, most of this ENTIRE scenario could happen to any person on this board or any other board out there. A "QUICK" trip is usually what turns into the "Hollywood" story you refer to.
    I am not worn out, I am just taking my bike for a walk!

  43. #43
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    I read the book first and then saw the movie. I would recommend the book for anyone who has seen the movie or is just interested.

    I did lose a little bit of respect for him after reading the book. The book tells of several adventures where Aaron is pretty reckless. It almost seems like it was more a matter of when, not if, an incident like the one portrayed in the movie was giong to happen.

    It did seem to put things in perspective for him and give him a slightly different outlook, it's just too bad he had to lose his arm in the process.

    He is a very impressive individual and his passion for the outdoors is inspiring. I don't know if I would have come out of his situation alive. He is obviously a very capable and skilled outdoorsman.

    Just my opinion, and go read the book if you haven't.

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