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  1. #1
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    Sea level Sucks!

    While spending Thanksgiving in Alabama on the Gulf coast last week, I had time to reflect on how utterly miserable I would be if I were confined to a life at sea level. We were staying at my sister and brother in-law's place on the beach where Katrina blew through. As you can see some of the places were trashed. And this area was 150 miles east of New Orleans!


    We tried to rent some bikes at an LBS but it was a no go. This place would be absolute hell (IMHO), if you're a cyclist. I think the highest elevation here is about 5 - 6 feet.

    The homes are on these huge stilts...when the storm surge comes in, the whole place is under 10 feet of water. Crazy.

    I guess for those of you that live at sea level you work with what you have. I read a good article on florida MTB'n (Oxymoron?) in Dirt Rag a few months back.

    Thankfully I live in a place where I can thrash my Turner at 6,000 feet.
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  2. #2
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    That' s why I live in Colorado. Sea level sux, and it's hard to get drunk there. I live at 8500' and love it. If I can't be above tree line, or stand on solid ground and look at the top of an airtplane in level flight, at least once a week, I get kinda antsy. Plus, without even trying, I'm in better cardio-vascular shape than 80% of the population!
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  3. #3
    high plains drifter
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    they don't have jet skiing there ?

  4. #4
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    Personally, I always wanted to live on

    STILTS!!!

    Ya baby!

    Rick
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  5. #5
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    Being on a sandbar has its moments, but yeah, I'd sure hate to live there.

    This is roughly the same area, back in March.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  6. #6
    bob
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    You got it all wrong.

    It's altitude that sucks...if you're from sea level. You can't climb when you visit CO. You watch totaly out of shape friends from Denver leave you in the dust as you hack up a lung and walk your bike. Then there's the alcohol issue. Why oh why did no one warn me about drinking at altitude? Why did none of my friends say "your going to have a giant vice grip on your head in the morning, if you keep drinking like that."?

  7. #7
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    Hence the line...

    [
    its a nice place to visit but i wouldnt want to live there....

  8. #8
    high plains drifter
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    pedaling 5 miles

    through that sand would be great strength training.........

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob
    It's altitude that sucks...if you're from sea level. You can't climb when you visit CO. You watch totaly out of shape friends from Denver leave you in the dust as you hack up a lung and walk your bike. Then there's the alcohol issue. Why oh why did no one warn me about drinking at altitude? Why did none of my friends say "your going to have a giant vice grip on your head in the morning, if you keep drinking like that."?
    Agreed... Bring those same "altitude guys" down to ride at sea level and watch them fry and sweat like pigs on the first mile and then beg for mercy at the first sand bank.... theymight have a great aerobic shape but they just can't stand the heat down at sea level.

    BTW... I'm from the Gulf Coast of Mexico (9ft above sea level) and now I live at Mexico City (7200ft). Every place on earth is a nice place to ride!!
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob
    You can't climb when you visit CO. :
    Assuming you CAN climb.....

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    Agreed... Bring those same "altitude guys" down to ride at sea level and watch them fry and sweat like pigs on the first mile and then beg for mercy at the first sand bank.... theymight have a great aerobic shape but they just can't stand the heat down at sea level.
    Gotta call ******** on that one. You get me to sea level and all that oxygen rich air and I'll be crankin' the big ring all damn day. Sorry to burst your bubble.

  12. #12
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by jugdish
    Gotta call ******** on that one. You get me to sea level and all that oxygen rich air and I'll be crankin' the big ring all damn day. Sorry to burst your bubble.
    You're daydreaming pal... I've seen it MANY times. You just couldn't stand the heat and humidity of my hometown at least.

    Really... I've seen high level athletes simply not holding up. I remember those guys from the Real Madrid (a spanish soccer team) trying to play at my hometown with a water bag on their hands. It's not the heat per se, it's the dehydration from the so humid weather.

    Even if your lungs are feeling fine, the rest of the body just can't stand it. You can count the blood vessels and pores on your skin as it tries to cool down.

    You can't go that fast on sand to get enough cooling... if you see yourself to ride between some trees, you can consider yourself fried.
    Last edited by Warp; 12-02-2005 at 10:58 AM.
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  13. #13
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    Its not so much the lack of altitude as it is lack of hills whatsoever to me......I only live at a few hundred feet but we have trees and hills and little to no sand out on the singletrack.......i will visit the coast but never move down there

    However ive found that riding the road bike , pushing the cardio, will put you on an even playing field with all but the most serious enthusiast types out in CO.....

    I hit Steamboat Springs to visit my old stomping ground once a summer and can climb the mtns with the best of them usually after about a day or 2 of being in town....all i can say is i attribute it to hard road miles the weeks prior

    But the equation is still like this:

    flatland MTB'er (racer) = CO MTB'er (recreational rider / racer)

    In my opinion

    However..... we OWN in the heat and humidity

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  14. #14
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    Come on Aqua, that's why Diego's got it all. I live at sea level and I too get to thrash my turner at 6K. It just take an hour by car to get there. Don't bash the sea level living. When the surf is overhead it beats riding the bike.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    You're daydreaming pal... I've seen it MANY times. You just couldn't stand the heat and humidity of my hometown at least.

    .
    Well gee wiz I must have daydreamed through my last two vacations.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jugdish
    Well gee wiz I must have daydreamed through my last two vacations.
    Where were you? Temp? Humidity?
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    Where were you? Temp? Humidity?
    Your logic only works in high temp and humidity. There are plenty of places at sea level that have mild temps and little humidity. San Diego is one of them. Come here from the rockies and you'll rule the local road rides along the coast (depending on the riders present of course).
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by troy
    Your logic only works in high temp and humidity. There are plenty of places at sea level that have mild temps and little humidity. San Diego is one of them. Come here from the rockies and you'll rule the local road rides along the coast (depending on the riders present of course).
    That's what I meant, I never menat it to be applicable to all cases.... try Veracruz, Mexico in May or June coming from wherever you please at altitude.

    I've seen higly trained pro athletes simply not holding up. Of course, how hot can be the shore of Labrador or Alaska?? Nothing to be compared.

    I can bet New Orleans (where the original pic is), Alabama and Mississippi have a much tougher weather than San Diego. Pacific coasts have colder waters and that helps weather to be a bit fresher. Atlantic Shores have hot water and that helps Greenland to be green part of the year.
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  19. #19
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    I can't

    "Assuming you CAN climb....."

    I can't. Not for any extended time at least. That was the point.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    While spending Thanksgiving in Alabama on the Gulf coast last week, I had time to reflect on how utterly miserable I would be if I were confined to a life at sea level. We were staying at my sister and brother in-law's place on the beach where Katrina blew through. As you can see some of the places were trashed. And this area was 150 miles east of New Orleans!


    We tried to rent some bikes at an LBS but it was a no go. This place would be absolute hell (IMHO), if you're a cyclist. I think the highest elevation here is about 5 - 6 feet.

    The homes are on these huge stilts...when the storm surge comes in, the whole place is under 10 feet of water. Crazy.

    I guess for those of you that live at sea level you work with what you have. I read a good article on florida MTB'n (Oxymoron?) in Dirt Rag a few months back.

    Thankfully I live in a place where I can thrash my Turner at 6,000 feet.

    You aren't trying to say our trails are boring are you? LOL!!!
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    Last edited by Cucucachu; 12-02-2005 at 01:12 PM.

  21. #21
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    Well......

    One of the main reasons (coming from a "Flat Lander") people love Florida is because we can go riding on Thanksgiving or Christmas day when it is 75 degrees. We have plenty of awesome trails here that tend to be way more technical then your mountainous courses....
    Try riding the TOE in Lakeland......I don't think you will have any complaints..

  22. #22
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    Actually, minus the elevation change we have some pretty good trails at Sea Level.

    And then we travel to places that have good elevation change...and toast the locals in the technical sections.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cucucachu
    You aren't trying to say our trails are boring are you?
    Is that uphill??? Looks like! LOL!!

    I was working sometime at Reynosa, Mexico... is pretty much like that in your pic but freaking hot and moderately humid. Also, substitue the crops in your pic for sorghum and you get the idea.... not fun but very good for fitness.
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  24. #24
    It's like butta baby~ !
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    Hey Cucucachu

    I was thinking that the trail looked like Oleta.....but Markham is not too far off.
    Have you seen this: Posted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:48 am Post subject: This looks like a fun time~!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    This is gonna be a good time....

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    Is that uphill??? Looks like! LOL!!

    I was working sometime at Reynosa, Mexico... is pretty much like that in your pic but freaking hot and moderately humid. Also, substitue the crops in your pic for sorghum and you get the idea.... not fun but very good for fitness.
    That pic of the double track is of a levy that crosses the Florida Everglades. It was posted as humor.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtygrl
    I was thinking that the trail looked like Oleta.....but Markham is not too far off.
    Have you seen this: Posted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:48 am Post subject: This looks like a fun time~!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    This is gonna be a good time....
    It was a pic of Markham. So is this one: A drop called Fred's Folly. Like they all say "Steeper than it looks"
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    You're daydreaming pal... I've seen it MANY times. You just couldn't stand the heat and humidity of my hometown at least.

    Really... I've seen high level athletes simply not holding up. I remember those guys from the Real Madrid (a spanish soccer team) trying to play at my hometown with a water bag on their hands. It's not the heat per se, it's the dehydration from the so humid weather..
    dehydration from humidity ?????????
    Am I the only one, or does that make any sense at all?
    I guess I was daydreaming when I was down in the Virgin Islands (plenty hot & humid in may) and felt like superman all week with plenty of hard physical activities. I just drank the normal amount of water I'm used to and was quite the opposite of dehydrated. Humidity takes a few hours to get used to. Don't get me wrong, I love sea level for certain things, love the ocean, sea kayaking, snorkeling, etc. I used to live in Florida, BTW. Just seems like that comment was way off base and predicated by a little "hometown ego" or something. Nothing a couple of pair of airline tickets couldn't settle, eh ???

    ... just thought of something: Tom Danielson (now of Team Discovery) won the Tour of Langkawi, Malaysia a few years back. Tom is from Durango, CO (about 6,500 ft) and I'm guessing Malaysia is pretty hot/humid?? thoughts?
    Last edited by hardtail05; 12-02-2005 at 01:19 PM.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jugdish
    Gotta call ******** on that one. You get me to sea level and all that oxygen rich air and I'll be crankin' the big ring all damn day. Sorry to burst your bubble.
    Dude, the heat gets to me in July & August and I live here in the heat and humidity. I gotta agree with Warp2003 and call your bluff.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtygrl
    I was thinking that the trail looked like Oleta.....but Markham is not too far off.
    Have you seen this: Posted: Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:48 am Post subject: This looks like a fun time~!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    This is gonna be a good time....

    Was it posted in Passion? Looking for it...

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtail05
    dehydration from humidity ?????????
    Am I the only one, or does that make any sense at all?
    I guess I was daydreaming when I was down in the Virgin Islands (plenty hot & humid in may) and felt like superman all week with plenty of hard physical activities. I just drank the normal amount of water I'm used to and was quite the opposite of dehydrated. Humidity takes a few hours to get used to. Don't get me wrong, I love sea level for certain things, love the ocean, sea kayaking, snorkeling, etc. I used to live in Florida, BTW. Just seems like that comment was way off base and predicated by a little "hometown ego" or something. Nothing a couple of pair of airline tickets couldn't settle, eh ???

    ... just thought of something: Tom Danielson (now of Team Discovery) won the Tour of Langkawi, Malaysia a few years back. Tom is from Durango, CO (about 6,500 ft) and I'm guessing Malaysia is pretty hot/humid?? thoughts?
    Lance is from Austin, TX and beats the crap out of anyone living in altitude while climbing...... he and Danielson are much above the fitness level of the average rider, aren't they??

    I could be wrong. But as soon as you leave the shore line and get between the trees and away from the sea breeze, the scenario really changes and becomes miserable. Riding around 4 in the afternoon is not something you want to do as the air gets quiet, the soil is hot and the sun is still shining hard.

    This is not something you'd notice in water or beach activities as you're constantly being refreshed by the breeze and/or water itself.

    Again, I live in altitude. I was grown up at the Gulf Coast (until I was 23). It takes me a couple days to get used to altitude back from sea level vacations, it takes me a couple days to get used to heat and humidity. It might be different for everyone but for the average person/rider changing from one place to the other takes some time to get used and the experience can be from not-enjoyable to totally miserable.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtygrl
    ..... We have plenty of awesome trails here that tend to be way more technical then your mountainous courses....
    Try riding the TOE in Lakeland......I don't think you will have any complaints..
    Any pics of this trail? sounds interesting

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cucucachu
    So is this one: A drop called Fred's Folly. Like they all say "Steeper than it looks"
    Where's the drop? I only see a short (shorter than it looks?) steep hill.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    Lance is from Austin, TX and beats the crap out of anyone living in altitude while climbing...... he and Danielson are much above the fitness level of the average rider, aren't they??

    .
    If they (Lance & Tom & etc) are average, than I have some serious work to do
    BTW, in the Tour of Langkawi, Danielson was not racing against "the average rider". I am guessing (have not verified this) that there were some Australians racing there from Humid Climates, but am not sure. Australia seems to have an awesome racing program and I've heard Queensland is pretty tropical/humid. Isn't Queensland where Robbie McEwan is from? There is a good write-up of this UCI race on http://www.cyclingnews.com/road/2003...results/stage9 where the humidity is mentioned.

    I know that Lance did tons of training in the Alps and many other places around Europe. Plus the elite racers from all over use "atlitude tents" (http://altitudetraining.com/main/products) to simulate altitude while they are sleeping, so you can't rely on what the pros do, either way. They seem to have ways available to themselvs to circumvent geography.

    Two points that don't make sense, though:
    first, I never said heat/humidity wasn't a drag, buy dehydration due to humidity ?
    When I was in humid climates, I was overhydrated, not dehydrated. It does suck to have your sweat not evaporate off, but I found I was able to breathe harder through my mouth without drying out as I would do here and that was a huge gain.

    second: Your second post stated "You're daydreaming pal... I've seen it MANY times. You just couldn't stand the heat and humidity of my hometown at least"
    That sounds more than a little bit cocky and arrogant to say the least. You make assumptions about this guy, knowing nothing about him. Maybe you are right, but maybe you are wrong. It would be no better for you (now that you live at altitude) to say something similar to Lance Armstrong (since he's from lowland Austin, Texas) "Lance, you are daydreaming, Pal.. you could not take the altitude here". What would happen after that could be ugly

    I guess all I'm trying to say is it's a bad idea to make assupmtions about people based on their geography. I hope this doesn't sound negative, cuz I would actualy love to check out riding in Mexico if I had the time/money. I wouldn't come down there thinking I was any better or worse based on where I happen to live. Mountain biking offers so much variety that we should never become regionaly-centric.
    Last edited by hardtail05; 12-02-2005 at 04:34 PM. Reason: fixing cyclingnews link

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    heavy air

    I live at 750 feet and travel to ride in CO a couple times of year. Durango or Crested Butte and have never had a problem riding at altitude. In fact I feel like I can breathe easier. The air feels light and thin as apposed to thick and heavy. The humidity is much harder to ride in IMHO. Dry air lets your sweat evaporate and cool you. In 90% humidity and 90+ degrees, you are just wet, hot and can't breathe. That guy that said that a flat land racer is like a CO recreational rider is full of SH**.... I went to Durango last May, did 6 days of epic riding and then did the Iron Horse Classic MTB race and placed 5th on totally trashed legs in the Sport Master 30-34 race. Its not where you live it is how much you ride and train effectively.

  35. #35
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    Wrong

    It's flat that sucks - not sea level. If you live near sea level but you have good hills and mountains, it's all good. We've got 2000 feet right next to the ocean here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtail05
    I guess all I'm trying to say is it's a bad idea to make assupmtions about people based on their geography. I hope this doesn't sound negative, cuz I would actualy love to check out riding in Mexico if I had the time/money. I wouldn't come down there thinking I was any better or worse based on where I happen to live. Mountain biking offers so much variety that we should never become regionaly-centric.
    Ok. You were right. I was wrong. It doesn't matter to me if I'm wrong.

    Sorry for making assumptions. Sorry if I was insulting, not my intention. Just talking from what I've seen, but if that's not the case for this person, that's fine to me. As someone said, it depends on the fitness of the person.

    Really, I have experienced and seen quite the opposite to what you describe, but that's ok. The fact that you're sweating it doesn't mean that you don't dehydrate.

    Anyway... you're welcome to come down to mexico and ride!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    Anyway... you're welcome to come down to mexico and ride!!!
    I saw a vid on Copper Canyon, looks awesome.

  38. #38
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    Wakeup

    Quote Originally Posted by wiruth
    Its not where you live it is how much you ride and train effectively.
    Living at altitude absolutely makes a difference. Ask pros who live at lower altitudes about racing against the Colorado boys.There's a reason the US Olympic headquarters is in Colorado Springs. The body acclimates. But everyone is different. Sounds to me like you are an aerobic mutant.
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    Yep my point exactly...its the flat that sucks and i agree with the altitude statement - of course altitude makes the difference........

    ......but im also banking that resistance to heat and humidity...(for example - not overheating in the summer races).....is also one heck of an attribute to have....unfortunately the 2 do not go hand in hand for training purposes

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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo-John
    It's flat that sucks - not sea level. If you live near sea level but you have good hills and mountains, it's all good. We've got 2000 feet right next to the ocean here.
    True, flat sucks no matter what elevation.


    What's the point of being way up there if you can't ride the whole winter?

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtygrl
    One of the main reasons (coming from a "Flat Lander") people love Florida is because we can go riding on Thanksgiving or Christmas day when it is 75 degrees. We have plenty of awesome trails here that tend to be way more technical then your mountainous courses....
    Try riding the TOE in Lakeland......I don't think you will have any complaints..

    yawn!!! give me a break, florida high point is like 400 feet. if i lived there for riding i would shoot myself. oh yea, when most people talk about technical, they are talking about dowhill technical, not FLAT. that place must blow! we ride year round also, but can still do 4000 foot descents here and be technical!

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp2003
    Every place on earth is a nice place to ride!!
    You've never been to Naturita, Colorado have you?
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    You've never been to Naturita, Colorado have you?
    Well... some places have a demoniac beauty, others are simply like bike heaven.

    I'd like to ride up at Colorado for sure... Fruita, Moab and the Alps are in my MTB Daydreaming list.

    I'll get my US Visa early January and I have enough miles for a round trip to the US... I just need to cinvince my SU to allow me to go alone and with the bike... tell me about jealousy!!
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  44. #44
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    Flat sucks even more when you add constant winds. But elevation gain doesn't necasarrily (sp) make for a good trail either.

    I have been fortunate in that I have had the opportunity to ride in many places all over the US. I have ridden very fun trails with almost no elevation change, and "trails" that were really nothing more than fire roads with massive amounts of elevation gain. What makes a trail fun has more to do with the way it is designed and how it takes advantage of the features that are available in the area more so than elevation change.

    But to get back on topic with the OP, I have spent some time on the Gulf Coast, and while it is not the greatest for MTB, there is a pretty healthy road community down there. And the NO guys can really kick ass!
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  45. #45
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtail05
    I saw a vid on Copper Canyon, looks awesome.
    And it's just the tip of the iceberg, man!!

    Seriously, we have endless trails and having so many different micro-environments (as you guys do up there too), everyplace has its own beauty.

    From the sierras like Copper Canyon, the forests in the Mexico City surroundings, to the rain forests of the south, the plains of Tamapulipas or Yucatan or desert like places like Baja... we have it all.

    Make a search on this board for Real de Catorce or search the "Other Areas" forum and search for Oaxaca (where Tigerdog made a bike trip from the Sierra to the Beach).

    I'm not that local-ego'ed You can bet that Moab, Fruita, the Alps and some places of Spain and Austria are in my "MTB Daydreaming list"
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  46. #46
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    There are pros and cons in everything!
    It's not the falling that hurts, it is the sudden stop at the bottom!

  47. #47
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    My take

    Aqua, all

    1997 my Wife and I and our young family moved to Seattle. The outdoor sports there were fantstic and the scenery was magnificent. Well the company sold off my division and the job dried up and we didn't have many contacts. So we moved back to MI. From Mtn and sea to flatland. It took me a long while to adjust to that change, let me tell you. But I leaned something also. No matter where you are living, you must be observent and figure out what makes that area special. I learned that Michigan tho not "In your Face" spectacular, has beautiful places you just have to look a little closer. The seasons, meadows, lakes, all have their beauty. No big elevation in SE MI, but the forest trails are nice and rooty, and you can for sure give yourself a nice ride if you like. And MI has a fantastic running community so there are other sports too to meet people and get the active lifestyle fix. Someday perhaps we'll be back West, but for now I'm interested in fully enjoying MI. And if I were in Alabama I might get mself a sand bike and learn how to surf fish. Beach-bike camp out and grilled ocean fish sound pretty nice.

    Oh BTW Aqua, only 6k ft? I heard the guys in CO routinely are peddling at 12k ft! ;-)

    Bob

  48. #48
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    Sure looks like my ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    While spending Thanksgiving in Alabama on the Gulf coast last week, I had time to reflect on how utterly miserable I would be if I were confined to a life at sea level. We were staying at my sister and brother in-law's place on the beach where Katrina blew through. As you can see some of the places were trashed. And this area was 150 miles east of New Orleans!


    We tried to rent some bikes at an LBS but it was a no go. This place would be absolute hell (IMHO), if you're a cyclist. I think the highest elevation here is about 5 - 6 feet.

    The homes are on these huge stilts...when the storm surge comes in, the whole place is under 10 feet of water. Crazy.

    I guess for those of you that live at sea level you work with what you have. I read a good article on florida MTB'n (Oxymoron?) in Dirt Rag a few months back.

    Thankfully I live in a place where I can thrash my Turner at 6,000 feet.

    ...Kitty Hawk neghborhood; I wouldn't know what to do with myself in the summer if I didn't have a house on stilts along the Atlantic; when I get the urge for mountains, I just fly down to Peru, otherwise, there is no place like altitude zero.

  49. #49
    PITY THE FOOL!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobde
    A


    Oh BTW Aqua, only 6k ft? I heard the guys in CO routinely are peddling at 12k ft! ;-)

    Bob
    We'll said bobde. If you can't find the good stuff where you live you probably aren't looking hard enough. I grew up on the NC coast which looks much like the pictures posted. It's no MTB heaven but it's unbelievably beautiful. Ton's of outdoor activities (awesome fishing).


    Don't heckle our altitude. So Cal's got it all. 6K is a lot considering it was 70 and beautiful today. Hung my xmas lights with no shirt. How's that for Christmas spirit.
    "Badges? We don't need no stinkin badges!"

  50. #50
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    Cairns Australia - Bike had no front brake and the BB was loose. $10 bucks for the day - ya can't beat that hey!
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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtail05
    dehydration from humidity ?????????
    Am I the only one, or does that make any sense at all?
    yeah, you dehydrate in humidity, assuming there is high heat associated with that humidity. ride hard. you sweat buckets. just because it doesn't immediately evaporate off your skin like it does in arid climates doesn't mean you aren't losing as much fluid or that you won't dehydrate.

    dehydration and overheating is a huge problem at sea level mtb races in the south. fluid replacement is essential. even for those of us who live rather than vacation here.

    rt
    "where are you not going so fast?" (question asked to cyclist on a trainer)

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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by *rt*
    yeah, you dehydrate in humidity, assuming there is high heat associated with that humidity. ride hard. you sweat buckets. just because it doesn't immediately evaporate off your skin like it does in arid climates doesn't mean you aren't losing as much fluid or that you won't dehydrate.

    dehydration and overheating is a huge problem at sea level mtb races in the south. fluid replacement is essential. even for those of us who live rather than vacation here.

    rt
    Ditto... Actually, as I'm from a humid/hot weather, when I went to work up to semi-desertic areas I found extremely dangerous the fact that you actually don't sweat drops. You realize that you've been losing fluids a little bit too late. That's when you're already thirsty or when you see the salt stains on your clothes or when you wipe your eyebrows and you feel no wet but like scrubbing your face with sandpaper (for the accumulated salt).

    I'd rather sweat lots while riding... it's a bit more measurable, in case you forget the rules of hydration.
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  53. #53
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    Actually Tom calls Durango home now, but grew up through high school in Lyme, Connecticut.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by dft
    yawn!!! give me a break, florida high point is like 400 feet. if i lived there for riding i would shoot myself. oh yea, when most people talk about technical, they are talking about dowhill technical, not FLAT. that place must blow! we ride year round also, but can still do 4000 foot descents here and be technical!
    I finally found some stuff on the TOE trail on the Internet. http://outdoortravels.com/biking_fl_overview_toe.html
    It looks pretty interesting and there are plenty of man-made things (ladder drops, etc) I wouldn't do since breaking a few bones over the years. The other (non man-made) stuff, including this small gully they rode through on the video would be considered "cute" by Colorado/Utah standards. I'm not knocking this trail in any way, but to say it is "Way more technical than your mountainous courses" is the most misleading statement I’ve ever seen on MTBR.COM. Ever see the stuff they have at Whistler/Blackcomb, Moab, Durango, Grand Junction? Heck, try Dakota Ridge near Denver. It’s not the vertical drop that makes this stuff technical. The vertical drop is another issue. Again, not knocking the TOE trail at all, it’s actually very pretty and I’m sure it’s lots of fun.

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