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  1. #1
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    Don't steal my ride!!!

    Maybe not the perfect passion post but...

    I just got the new bike a few weeks back. The first 3 weeks it spent the night in my bedroom. I then conceded at my wifes pleas that this was a little overboard. The next week it slept in the front family room area. Now (again due to my wifes pleas), it has been moved to the garage with the other bikes for nitetime storage. This was hard on me but eventually common sense must prevail.

    The garage is known for being a very easy entry point for theives. I currently lock my bikes up with a sturdy cable type combination lock. But, I have no permanant structures to lock it to. I just wrap the cable around a 2x2 wood shelf support and a metal traingle affixed to the wall that supports the said wood shelving frame. This is a good deterent for the average "thief of opportunity" as you can't just run into my garage while the door is open and run off with the bike, but, I have thought about fixing a big "I" bolt into the concrete for a more secure lockup while I'm away..

    Question: Any ideas on how to securely lock up my bike in the garage? If my chop saw, tool box and Ridged drill set get stolen thats one thing, but my bikes!!! Not good, haha.

    Thks-JB

  2. #2
    Never worng!
    Reputation: Verewolf's Avatar
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    If you have a steel beam or something solid you can chain it to that.
    I bought my chain at a contractor supply store.
    The chain is a Grade 70 5/16" boron manganese steel chain which is exceptionally hard.
    It cannot be cut with any type of bolt cutters.
    When I bought it they had to cut it on a machine due to the hardness.
    The most important part of a chain is the "Grade #".
    I'm not exactly sure but stores like Home Depot etc. only carry chains up to a Grade 35.

    The lock I use is a contractor heavy duty padlock.

  3. #3
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    Well the eye bolt in the floor is a good idea....

    that works pretty well, as long as it is a good hardened steel bolt. The problem is you are leaving tools in the garage that they can use to cut a chain, cable, or bolt! Your best defense in this case is to think about the security of your garage the same way you do your house. Is the garage attached to the house? Does it have an external entry door, or windows? Do all external entry points have locks? Do you use the locks? Can you open the overhead doors from the outside manually, or do you have openers that require a remote? What about the overhead door construction? Is the overhead made of good heay wood, or metal? Or is it made of cheaper lightweight fiberglass or plastic composite material?

    The idea is to make it as dificult for a theif to enter as possbile. Consider the above and think about what you can to do beef up the entry points to your garage. Your eye bolt and cable ideas are good, but minimal. The problem being is that once a theif is IN the garage he is under cover and can work "out of sight", and with a greatly reduced chance of being heard as well. A good bolt cutter will make short work of cables or chains.

    Here is what I would suggest. Go with you eyebolt and cable lock set up. But secure the building as well. Exterior doors should be STEEL not wood, no window in the door, and a minimum of a 1/2" thick keyed dead bolt lock. Overhead door, or doors, should have a QUALITY opener, one with a locking device that automatically jams the mechanism against forced opening unless the remote is used. In addition the doors should have a slide lock. This is an internal only lock that is simply a bolt that runs through the track that the door (s) ride in and basically jams the overhead door shut. To open, the bolt is slid out of the way and the door will then move freely in the tracks (I would do this even without an opener). And finally, any exterior window, no matter how secure you think they are, should have bars placed over them FROM THE INSIDE!!! While those ornate iron bars that are externally mounted, can be pretty, they are vulnerable.

    This will make your garage more secure. But not if you don't use the security devices! You'll have to get security minded and remember to use the devices you have ALL THE TIME! Never leave the garage open, never forget to secure even one of the locks etc. Make sure you have spare keys in the house for any external doors. Remember if a thief can't get in, neither can you!!! A lost key could make you VERY late for work some morning.

    Anyway those are minimal ways that you can secure your garage better. Hopefully adding the above will make everybody elses garage in the neighborhood an easier target than yours. It may sound a bit spendy, but everything else that you store in there will be more secure as well. Your car, lawnmower, tools, etc. For a little more peace of mind I would also recommend that you check your home owners policy and make sure that bikes are covered. And not just for "value" but for replacement cost! If they are not, then add a rider to your policy that covers them, again NOT for value, but for replacement cost! Bikes depreciate WAY to fast to have them insured at current value.

    So, take a look at your garage with an eye for security, and don't think garage think HOUSE! Secure it like you were going to live in it and your bikes will be as safe as if they were in the house with you. It doesn't mean that a determined thief won't be able to get in, but it will make it considerably harder. And the harder it is, the less likely the thief is to try. Hope that helps a little.

    Good Dirt
    Last edited by Squash; 11-20-2005 at 08:06 AM.
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
    bpuodt
    Reputation: Robot Chicken's Avatar
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    Put 9000 volts of pulse current through the bikes.

    Then leave a bottle of BarBQ sauce in the garage. Cook those suckers on the spot!







    Actually, want to know THE BEST METHOD?

    Paint all of your bikes bright pink.
    Unless the thief is a girl, you're safe.

  5. #5
    This is how it started...
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    I can relate to the "new bike" jitters. Check with your home owners insurance policy to attach a rider (usually very inexpensive to do) that will cover your bike and/or the rest of your misc. possesions in the garage. Make sure you have it covered for replacement cost, or get "retail" price receipts as additional padding for the inconvenience.
    Yeah, it's a bummer to have your bike stolen but, buying a new one with the latest stuff is not all bad either.

  6. #6
    Never worng!
    Reputation: Verewolf's Avatar
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    Cable type chains are OK for low crime areas but they can be easily cut with bolt cutters.

    Just want to repeat one point -
    A Grade 70 or Grade 80 chain is stronger than any Kryptonite chain or any bike chain sold.
    These chains are used to lift heavy equipment. They can be bought in any length.
    I doubt if any homeowner has a machine cutter capable of cutting a Grade 70 chain.

  7. #7
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    I have two large eyebolts attached to a 2x4 which is bolted to a stud in my garage. I run a thick cable through the wheels and frame then use a padlock. Sure if you really wanted it you could steal it, but nobody's going to just roll off with it.
    I also keep the garage door closed so it's not visible from the street. It's tougher to steal if they don't know it's there.
    Big hoopy.
    Turner Sultan / On One Inbred

  8. #8
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    Actually...

    Quote Originally Posted by Verewolf
    I doubt if any homeowner has a machine cutter capable of cutting a Grade 70 chain.
    If they want to steal it, they will. Dremel, abrasive chop saw, angle grinder, torch, plasma cutter, stick welder, cold cut saw - all are pretty common and will cut just about anything. The best you can do is slow them down enought that they will go elsewhere.

    /rl

  9. #9
    "Mr. Britannica"
    Reputation: roadiegonebad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robot Chicken
    Actually, want to know THE BEST METHOD?

    Paint all of your bikes bright pink.
    Unless the thief is a girl, you're safe.


    actually pink is in (or at least was)

  10. #10
    Never worng!
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    Quote Originally Posted by climber
    If they want to steal it, they will. Dremel, abrasive chop saw, angle grinder, torch, plasma cutter, stick welder, cold cut saw - all are pretty common and will cut just about anything. The best you can do is slow them down enought that they will go elsewhere.

    /rl
    A Dremel won't cut an alloy Grade 70 chain.
    But if you see a guy in your neighborhood with a stocking over his head
    pushing an industrial cutter definitely call the police because he's coming to get your bike.

    Rethinking theft prevention - probably the cheapest way to go is to put a sign on your garage door
    that says, "My Neighbor Has A Seven Cycles Titanium Sola"

  11. #11
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    "A Dremel won't cut an alloy Grade 70 chain."

    Depending on the bit and the amount of time you want to spend it is unlikely it won't eventually wear it out but you are buying time and effort on the part of the theif.

    "Rethinking theft prevention - probably the cheapest way to go is to put a sign on your garage door
    that says, "My Neighbor Has A Seven Cycles Titanium Sola""

    You forgot to add that he is also a non-violent unarmed pacifist.
    Last edited by archer; 11-21-2005 at 11:48 AM.

  12. #12
    Never worng!
    Reputation: Verewolf's Avatar
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    The most vulnerable part of my setup with the chain is the bike itself
    if a thief is willing to destroy part of the bike.
    The next weakest part is the lock used to secure the chain.

    Sheldon Brown is one of the greatest authorities on bikes.
    Whenever I need to know something bike related I go to his site.
    The link below is from Sheldon Brown's site re: the proper way to lock a bike.

    Sheldon Brown's Lock Strategy

  13. #13
    \|/Home of the Braves\|/
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    I forgot to add my "at work" strategy.
    I have a hitch mounted rack which I put a combo cable lock through. I then back my car in to minimize visibility. Since I park in a deck I back in far enough so that the arms of the rack go over the retaining wall. They barely clear (I checked it out the first time I parked) and there is not room to get the frame off even if the cable lock were cut. They'd have to steal the whole car!
    Big hoopy.
    Turner Sultan / On One Inbred

  14. #14
    Eclectic Cyclist
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    Security

    Don't forget to make sure the bikes are not visible through any windows.
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain

  15. #15
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    -cool ideas folks, thanks. The comment about the dude with a stocking on his head pushing an industrial cutter down the street cracked me up.

    The primary goal is to make a potential thief go elswhere, and if my bikes look like just too much of a PITA for to mess with then they will leave them alone.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    The garage is known for being a very easy entry point for theives. I currently lock my bikes up with a sturdy cable type combination lock. But, I have no permanant structures to lock it to.
    Uh..... where do you live again???

    Just kidding!

    I lock both of my good bikes to an old fashioned rockinghorse and a lawnmower with a long cable lock in the garage. Then, I place my kid's tricycles and plastic big wheels all around them.

    For the kicker, I place my sisters Walmart Mongoose right in the open... by the front door of the garage. At night, in the dark, a generic theif is not going to know the difference between a $69 Mongoose and a $2,000 Specialized.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    The garage is known for being a very easy entry point for theives. I currently lock my bikes up with a sturdy cable type combination lock. But, I have no permanant structures to lock it to. I just wrap the cable around a 2x2 wood shelf support and a metal traingle affixed to the wall that supports the said wood shelving frame.


    Hmmm.... easy to break into the garage, no good fixture to lock the bike to.... What's your address?
    But seriously, I could picture someone saying, "I've got the perfect lock--tell me your address and I'll send it to you." You never know who reads these posts...
    功夫大师喜欢骑着他的自行车在山上。

  18. #18
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    I came across a "stronghold" made by Kryptonite. Its one of those little mounds directly anchored into the concrete that you might see at a motorcycle parking lot. Looks cool but what is it really...a $70 I bolt right? haha. It does flip down into a nice little hump so you can drive over it though.

  19. #19
    Obsessed Rider
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    I use the stronghold with a onguard 12mm titanium hex chain.....my bike is safe

  20. #20
    DIY all the way
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    I have made a system for a friend, that is made up of hardened stainless steel. I tried a faily big bolt cutter on a piece of extra chain, and it did not cut the link.

    The reason for the "stainless" part, is that the latest fad around here among criminals, is to carry a battery powered angle grinder. Such will take out hardened steel relatively easy, but it runs too fast for stainless steel, and while it sure will be doable, it will take a long time to cut through, and make a lot of noise.
    This coupled with an anchor in concrete, and it will take quite some time, with a lot of noise, to cut a bike free.

    Another thing to keep in mind, is to avoid popular bike locks, as the thieves knows how to deal with those. The best solution for a lock, is a padlock with a class 10 system lock cylinder. Those are usually made well, and real hard to pick.

    Magura

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verewolf View Post
    Cable type chains are OK for low crime areas but they can be easily cut with bolt cutters.

    Just want to repeat one point -
    A Grade 70 or Grade 80 chain is stronger than any Kryptonite chain or any bike chain sold.
    These chains are used to lift heavy equipment. They can be bought in any length.
    I doubt if any homeowner has a machine cutter capable of cutting a Grade 70 chain.
    chain is only as good as its weakest link though, ie lock at that point. if your lock is not of equal quality then what is the point?

    talk about digging up old threads, just looked at the date.......
    Trek Fuel EX 6
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    My photos

  22. #22
    Huckin' trails
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    What about buying a big ass safe to fit them in ?

    Or maybe anti-personnal mines in front of the bikes lane
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  23. #23
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    burglar mines

    I don't know if it's a good idea or not, but they make them.http://burglarbomb.com/

  24. #24
    Unpredictable
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    Let's face it, your bike is an avatar for you. From the bedroom, to the family room couch, to the garage, to an unknown future. Your wife has you by the short and curleys. Get that steed back in the bedroom right now.

  25. #25
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    lol
    thieves brake in
    eatdrinkride : take my wife just please leave my bike alone

  26. #26
    Master of the Face Plant
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    Chains, alarms etc are all good choices but all of them are always defeatable by a thief. Keep in mind they will even cut your frame just to get all the parts.

    My security system weighs 90 pounds and covers the whole house including the garage.
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
    ^^^Best Bike Shop of MTBR 2008^^^

  27. #27
    My spelling is atroshus
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandmangts View Post
    Chains, alarms etc are all good choices but all of them are always defeatable by a thief. Keep in mind they will even cut your frame just to get all the parts.

    My security system weighs 90 pounds and covers the whole house including the garage.
    I don't think pee wee herman bikes are high on the theft list nowadays.

  28. #28
    Master of the Face Plant
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    Quote Originally Posted by RBowles View Post
    I don't think pee wee herman bikes are high on the theft list nowadays.
    True, that bike looks like a real POS to a person with little or no knowledge of the history of mountain biking. It is actually one of the most valuable bikes I own.
    http://clunkers.net/
    http://www.nbbikes.com/
    ^^^Best Bike Shop of MTBR 2008^^^

  29. #29
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    Just put a bunch of these around your bike!


  30. #30
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    Dude, keep the bike in the house. I have five in the living room.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    Dude, keep the bike in the house. I have five in the living room.
    Exactly

  32. #32
    Huckin' trails
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    I all keep my bikes in the basement... If they can make it there, THEN make it out with the bikes, then they deserve it... Because it's ain't easy when you don't know the place
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandmangts View Post
    Chains, alarms etc are all good choices but all of them are always defeatable by a thief. Keep in mind they will even cut your frame just to get all the parts.

    My security system weighs 90 pounds and covers the whole house including the garage.
    Yours is easily defeated as well:




    I have 3 big dogs that would be your new best friend if you gave them one of those.

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